Japan

maximus otter

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Prepare to be slightly depressed by what the modern world can do to people:

l have learned the Japanese phrase for these people’s lifestyle: saibā hōmuresu. lt’s Japlish for “cyber homeless”.

Whoopee.

maximus otter
 

Yithian

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l have learned the Japanese phrase for these people’s lifestyle: saibā hōmuresu. lt’s Japlish for “cyber homeless”.

Whoopee.

maximus otter
It's very common to adopt English loanwords into Japanese, but the pronunciation changes to meet the Japanese phonemic set. The funny endings (waifu!) exist because certain endings are not possible in the language so that final schwa-like vowel is added to make them fit.

The fun part is when the loan words are... well... borrowed for a new coinage: the Koreans have 'eye-shopping' for window shopping, for instance.

Some are impossible. I read the word Parfait in Korean fifty times before I realised what it was. I knew it wasn't Korean owing to the ending, but I couldn't figure it out ('F' changes to 'P' which further cloaked the original).
 

PeteByrdie

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Prepare to be slightly depressed by what the modern world can do to people:

I haven't been able to watch all of this, but the guy at the beginning gave me a thought. My life is cluttered with books and DVDs and ornaments I barely give a second look at these days. They take up more room than they should really. I look at my nine year old stepson, and he's got toys he doesn't play with. When I was nine my toys were my life, but he has so many detailed virtual worlds to access his expensive Schleich castle and knights sit on a shelf. We have online access to our accounts wherever we go these days. Increasingly we can work from home. Our mail is often electronic. Is there much need for actual homes? I spend a lot of time on the road and am often parked in a layby in a lorry... watching films or reading books on my phone, communicating with people online. Laws have struggled with new age travellers, how will society cope with increasing cybernomads? How much cheaper a way to live might it be for a new generation who are fine with very few comforts as long as they're connected?
 
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More about the hikikomori, they can also be victims of attacks by elderly parents at the end of their tethers.

After the stabbing of 17 schoolgirls and two adults at a bus stop near Tokyo last week, a shocked public has been grasping for answers as to what could possibly have driven someone to commit such a horrific act.

Investigators and the news media have zeroed in on the fact that the attacker, who killed himself after the assault, which left two dead, lived as an extreme recluse – or “hikikomori,” as the condition is known in Japan.

Then came another grisly crime over the weekend: a retired senior government official fatally stabbed his 44-year-old son, who lived with his parents and had no other social contact. The father (76) reportedly feared that his son, who had physically abused his mother, might attack others, specifically citing the mass stabbing in Kawasaki, near Tokyo.

Even before these spasms of violence, Japan’s hundreds of thousands of hikikomori faced a stigma in a country that has retained a strong taboo against even acknowledging mental illness. Now, psychiatrists and advocates worry that a new wave of fearmongering will leave hikikomori even more vilified and painted falsely as prone to heinous crimes.

While there are extreme recluses in other countries, experts say the condition may be most pronounced in Japan, where a culture that emphasises conformity prompts those who do not fit in to hide away.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/wor...-stigma-after-attack-on-schoolgirls-1.3918044
 

Yithian

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Young, broke, Japanese? Try buying Jiko Bukken.

Just don't ask how the former owner checked out...

The Japanese estate agent selling 'haunted' houses

Akira has been selling 'haunted' houses for five years and has dealt with around 500 homes.
In Japan, many people believe that houses can be haunted, and that the ghosts of people who died a lonely death, killed themselves or were murdered can haunt the living.


These properties are on the increase with a declining Japanese population, which is expected to drop from 127 million to about 88 million by 2065.

Video produced by Daniel South and Terushi Sho:
https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-asia-48585587/the-japanese-estate-agent-selling-haunted-houses

Screenshot 2019-06-11 at 22.21.25.png
 

Yithian

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I think we've all now heard of places where single men and women can hire 'fake' partners, but the business is expanding its scope in Japan:

How to Hire Fake Friends and Family
In Japan, you can pay an actor to impersonate your relative, spouse, coworker, or any kind of acquaintance.
Money may not be able to buy love, but here in Japan, it can certainly buy the appearance of love—and appearance, as the dapper Ishii Yuichi insists, is everything. As a man whose business involves becoming other people, Yuichi would know. The handsome and charming 36-year-old is on call to be your best friend, your husband, your father, or even a mourner at your funeral.​
His 8-year-old company, Family Romance, provides professional actors to fill any role in the personal lives of clients. With a burgeoning staff of 800 or so actors, ranging from infants to the elderly, the organization prides itself on being able to provide a surrogate for almost any conceivable situation.​
Yuichi believes that Family Romance helps people cope with unbearable absences or perceived deficiencies in their lives. In an increasingly isolated and entitled society, the CEO predicts the exponential growth of his business and others like it, as à la carte human interaction becomes the new norm.​
I sat down recently with Yuichi in a café on the outskirts of Tokyo, to discuss his business and what it means to be, in the words of his company motto, “more than real.”​
Interview that goes some way to explaining the cultural currents which have given birth to the industry:​
A mini-documentary on the topic:

https://www.bbc.com/reel/video/p07d23t6/a-rental-service-for-lonely-people

I find this so damned depressing. I consider myself neither excessively nor deficiently charitable, but if I knew there was somebody lonely living within a short walk of my place and I had some kind of interaction with them, I'd happily call round once or twice a week with a bottle and have dinner with them.

It's that you don't know and people, generally, aren't saying.

There has to be a way around that barrier.
 

Mythopoeika

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A mini-documentary on the topic:

https://www.bbc.com/reel/video/p07d23t6/a-rental-service-for-lonely-people

I find this so damned depressing. I consider myself neither excessively nor deficiently charitable, but if I knew there was somebody lonely living within a short walk of my place and I had some kind of interaction with them, I'd happily call round once or twice a week with a bottle and have dinner with them.

It's that you don't know and people, generally, aren't saying.

There has to be a way around that barrier.
People need to carry flags saying 'I am lonely'.
Or maybe not, because that may make them targets.
 
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