Minor Strangeness

RaM

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My granddad used to boil clocks this cleared the muck out then the smallest drop of oil on the moving bits and good to go for a few years
Seen others suspend them over a container of petrol but would not recommend that with modern petrol
 

brownmane

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I thought you were referencing The Red Balloon, the classic French short film from the 1950s!
That was what I thought, but didn't want to mention it as I hated the movie. For some unknown reason, in elementary school I saw this movie ad nauseum. Probably because that was when we had reels and probably had little selection. I thought the whole concept was stupid and boooooring. I would never willingly reference the movie.
 

Mythopoeika

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My granddad used to boil clocks this cleared the muck out then the smallest drop of oil on the moving bits and good to go for a few years
Seen others suspend them over a container of petrol but would not recommend that with modern petrol
Meths may be better. That'll clean anything.
 
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Mikefule

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Did it stop, short, never to go again when the old man died by any chance? :thought:

Not sure you know, but Min is referencing song lyrics. You may not be as old as she :evillaugh: lol (I'm sure you can tell that I may be same age as Min as I know the song she's referencing)
True story:

I used to know a chap who ran a clock repair/restoration and sales business. We have lost touch now, but we were very good friends for a while and I often visited him, and even bought a couple of clocks from him. One day, I set up a fake AOL email address with a convincing name of a fake customer and sent him a message. 20 or more years after the event, I can't recall the original wording but it was more or less as follows:


Dear Sir, I wonder if you might be able to give me advice about repairs to a clock, and perhaps some idea of the resale value. Unfortunately, I do not know an awful lot about clocks, but I have just inherited this one from my late grandfather, who died recently at the ge of 90.

All I can tell you is that it is very tall — far too tall for the shelf — and for the last 90 years it has stood in the hall. It was taller by far than my grandfather. I remember he had to reach up to wind it. However, I remember that he once remarked that allthough it was taller than him, it weighed "not a pennyweight more."

I believe it was exactly the same age as my grandfather, being bought by his own father on the very morning of my grandfather's birth. It stood in the same spot for 90 years, working perfectly, but stopped at exactly the time of my grandfather's death and we have been unable to get it started since. I don't know if it will ever go again.

My friend, despite being a Morris man who had attended many music song sessions in many pubs, did not make the connection with the song and he sent quite a formal reply, expressing his condolences for my recent loss, but saying he felt unable to advise without more details of the clock.

For those who don't know the song:
My grandfather's clock was too tall for the shelf
So it stood ninety years on the floor
It was taller by half than the old man himself
Though it weighed not a pennyweight more

It was bought on the morn of the day that he was born
And was always his treasure and pride
But it stopped, short never to go again
When the old man died

Ninety years without slumbering
His life seconds numbering
It stopped, short never to go again
When the old man died

My grandfather said that of those he could hire
Not a servant so faithful he found
For it wasted no time and had but one desire
At the close of each week to be wound

And it kept in its place, not a frown upon its face
And its hands never hung by its side
But it stopped short, never to go again
When the old man died

It rang and alarmed in the dead of the night
An alarm that for years had been dumb
And we knew that his spirit was pluming for flight
That his hour for departure had come

Still the clock kept the time with a soft and muffled chime
As we silently stood by his side
But it stopped short, never to go again
When the old man died

Ninety years without slumbering
His life seconds numbering
It stopped short, never to go again
When the old man died
 

Min Bannister

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brownmane

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Lol, I am not sure how old you need to be. :chuckle: Apparently it was written in 1876 and I am not that old. :p

We have a thread on the subject called Clocks Stopping at the Time of Death.

https://forums.forteana.org/index.p...t-the-time-of-death.67597/page-2#post-1993554
We were taught it in elementary school music class. Did not know it was that old, but I knew our music books were old at the time. We also learned "I'se the B'y" which I think is an Eastern Coast Canadian folk song.
 

GNC

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That was what I thought, but didn't want to mention it as I hated the movie. For some unknown reason, in elementary school I saw this movie ad nauseum. Probably because that was when we had reels and probably had little selection. I thought the whole concept was stupid and boooooring. I would never willingly reference the movie.

Surely the National Film Board of Canada could have stepped in to provide more variety in your entertainment? The Big Snit? The Cat Came Back? Cosmic Zoom?
 

brownmane

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Surely the National Film Board of Canada could have stepped in to provide more variety in your entertainment? The Big Snit? The Cat Came Back? Cosmic Zoom?
I love "The Cat Came Back". It's was on tv many times when I was a kid. I don't recall seeing it at school on a reel.
 

Trevp666

It was like that when I got here.........honest!!!
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Saw this in the 'humour and jokes' thread, and about 30 seconds later there was a question on the Radio 2 'popmaster' quiz...
"The Village People had a UK number one with YMCA in 1978 - what was their only other top ten single in the UK?"
Maybe if I had bothered to look up their discography off the back of seeing this joke I would've been able to give the correct answer (answer below).
(The answer was 'In the Navy')
 

Tempest63

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We buried my mother yesterday after nearly seven weeks since she passed, first possible opportunity.
I will happily admit I have not quite been tea total since she died and I don’t know what happened to the water jug that has disappeared from next to the sink. But I have been plagued over the last few days by things moving very very quickly at the periphery of my vision. I spin expecting to see a fly or similar but there is nothing there.
I’m sure it is down to over indulgence and a complete lack of sleep in the run up to the funeral but I have never experienced this constant movement at the side of my vision.
Hopefully a couple of dry nights and some half decent sleeps will sort it out.
 

Coal

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We buried my mother yesterday after nearly seven weeks since she passed, first possible opportunity.
I will happily admit I have not quite been tea total since she died and I don’t know what happened to the water jug that has disappeared from next to the sink. But I have been plagued over the last few days by things moving very very quickly at the periphery of my vision. I spin expecting to see a fly or similar but there is nothing there.
I’m sure it is down to over indulgence and a complete lack of sleep in the run up to the funeral but I have never experienced this constant movement at the side of my vision.
Hopefully a couple of dry nights and some half decent sleeps will sort it out.
Sorry about your mother @Tempest63.

If the weirdness doesn't clear up, go see a professional, stress can fast foward all sorts of nasty stuff.
 

cycleboy2

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We buried my mother yesterday after nearly seven weeks since she passed, first possible opportunity.
I will happily admit I have not quite been tea total since she died and I don’t know what happened to the water jug that has disappeared from next to the sink. But I have been plagued over the last few days by things moving very very quickly at the periphery of my vision. I spin expecting to see a fly or similar but there is nothing there.
I’m sure it is down to over indulgence and a complete lack of sleep in the run up to the funeral but I have never experienced this constant movement at the side of my vision.
Hopefully a couple of dry nights and some half decent sleeps will sort it out.
My mother died the week before last and her funeral is on June 1, so you have my condolences.

She always said she planned to live to 100 and then come back and haunt us, though her body gave out at 88. And though I don't tend to believe in such things...

...My father and I arrived at the care home she died in around 10 minutes too late (I'd like to have said goodbye but she wouldn't have known, and I'm not sure I could have coped with being there when she died). At about that time - within a minute or two - we were stuck in traffic and there was the sound of a slo-mo car on car collision.

About three cars behind us there had been a shunt, and I feel my mum was involved. It was very minor, nobody hurt. She would have approved! Don't ask...

Also around the same time I lost one of my four pairs of glasses (two readers, two distance). I looked everywhere, and then they were - about a week later - on our very small living room table in their case, large as life. Even I'm not that blind. That was genuinely strange.

I've also dreamt about her at least four times.

In the first dream she said she said she didn't want there to be a funeral. She had left her body to science but because she had dementia - which could be the result of CJD - the medical school wouldn't accept her, so she's being cremated.

And then I dreamt that she'd come upstairs and said "I'm sorry, love", and she never called me 'love'.

I'm also drinking more than usual, but that'll go down after the funeral.
 

Tempest63

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My mother died the week before last and her funeral is on June 1, so you have my condolences.

She always said she planned to live to 100 and then come back and haunt us, though her body gave out at 88. And though I don't tend to believe in such things...

...My father and I arrived at the care home she died in around 10 minutes too late (I'd like to have said goodbye but she wouldn't have known, and I'm not sure I could have coped with being there when she died). At about that time - within a minute or two - we were stuck in traffic and there was the sound of a slo-mo car on car collision.

About three cars behind us there had been a shunt, and I feel my mum was involved. It was very minor, nobody hurt. She would have approved! Don't ask...

Also around the same time I lost one of my four pairs of glasses (two readers, two distance). I looked everywhere, and then they were - about a week later - on our very small living room table in their case, large as life. Even I'm not that blind. That was genuinely strange.

I've also dreamt about her at least four times.

In the first dream she said she said she didn't want there to be a funeral. She had left her body to science but because she had dementia - which could be the result of CJD - the medical school wouldn't accept her, so she's being cremated.

And then I dreamt that she'd come upstairs and said "I'm sorry, love", and she never called me 'love'.

I'm also drinking more than usual, but that'll go down after the funeral.
You have my condolence. Nearly seven weeks for a funeral was a long time for us and I feel sure you need that over to move on. In comparison we buried her yesterday in the same grave as my Dad. He died 1st May 1985 and we had the funeral 10 days later, now you have to wait nearly seven weeks.
My thoughts are with you and your family. Take care!
 

Tempest63

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Sorry about your mother @Tempest63.

If the weirdness doesn't clear up, go see a professional, stress can fast foward all sorts of nasty stuff.
I feel sure it’s the tiredness caused by the weeks of waiting to have the funeral. My HR department have given me the week off for some R&R and after a few mornings solitude at the allotment I reckon I will get myself together.
Thank you for your kind words.
 

BeardSprite

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We buried my mother yesterday after nearly seven weeks since she passed, first possible opportunity.

My mother died the week before last and her funeral is on June 1

Sincere condolences to you both - the passing of a parent (or anyone close) is always a rough time, look after yourselves.

And of course, continue to relate any potential Fortean Happenings, if/as and when you feel up to it.
 

Tempest63

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Also around the same time I lost one of my four pairs of glasses (two readers, two distance). I looked everywhere, and then they were - about a week later - on our very small living room table in their case, large as life. Even I'm not that blind. That was genuinely strange.
I posted elsewhere that my wife hung a mirror at home taken from mums lounge and the next day a water jug that sits next to the kitchen sink had disappeared and still hasn’t re-apported. It was only used to carry water to the dogs bowl, no other purpose at all and now it’s gone.
I am very sceptical these days and am sure it has been misplaced but it the sort of mischievousness that mum would have got up to if she wanted to send a message.
 
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uair01

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Phil Smith on Facebook says >>> perish the thought that we should waste time on idle speculation

1652208962851.png
 

Mungoman

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We know that it will happen...the death of our Mum, and we start to prepare ourselves, but, they leave such a hole in our lives when they do go, don't they...

My Mum let go of Her earthly attachment 10 years ago yesterday Coal, and Cycleboy2, and I still miss our Mum - some days, more so than others.

And yes, they do play tricks on us - of this I'm sure.

So shine on and allow yourselves some leeway...don't be too hard on your good selves.
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
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We know that it will happen...the death of our Mum, and we start to prepare ourselves, but, they leave such a hole in our lives when they do go, don't they...

Indeed ... I've said for decades that the one major life event nobody seems to mention or prepare you for is the loss of parents. Regardless of the quality you attribute to your relationship with them - most particularly the mother - their final departure from your ongoing life causes unforeseen shock waves. I think much of it relates to the fact that, for better or worse, your parents (in most cases) represent a big part of the foundation to your own life. A "bad" parent can exert as much or more influence on who you are and how you live as a really "good" one. Once they're gone you're truly and irrevocably on your own.
 

Sollywos

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A minor strangeness concerning my father's death many years ago.

We'd been to visit my parents with our baby son. Dad had gone into the loft and brought down a little trike which he'd had stashed away for years even though my son was still a little young for it. I'm glad he did as if he'd waited until he was it would have been too late.

My parents didn't have a phone so my Mum used to go to the village phone box for a quick call to make sure we'd got back alright. There was never time to say much as she'd put in the minimum coinage. (Oh how times have changed regarding phone usage!) This time however it was, for the first time, my dad who'd phoned. after the usual assurance we had quite a chat but I was puzzled as I hadn't heard dad put any more coins in. 'Well I'll be blowed, thas a rummun*, summats up with the phone I reckon', he said. He'd only put in the 10p and no pips had gone or anything it just wasn't cutting off. So we just carried on talking until there was nothing left to say. Reminiscing and what not.

Oh how lucky that it was my dad who'd made the call and that it was when the phone wasn't working as it should as 2 days later he'd died of a heart attack at only 57.

Nothing could soften that blow of course I was so devasted that he wasn't going to see his grandson grow up and take him fishing with the little rod (proper one not a toy) that he'd already got for him. He was so looking forward to it. However that long phone call did something to bring a bit of peace to my emotions there had been nothing left unsaid so no regrets on that score at least.

So divine providence or just a random event that was lucky? Who knows? I hope you'll understand that I prefer the former interpretation. :)

*'Thas a rummun' Norfolk for 'that's strange'
 

Mungoman

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A minor strangeness concerning my father's death many years ago.

We'd been to visit my parents with our baby son. Dad had gone into the loft and brought down a little trike which he'd had stashed away for years even though my son was still a little young for it. I'm glad he did as if he'd waited until he was it would have been too late.

My parents didn't have a phone so my Mum used to go to the village phone box for a quick call to make sure we'd got back alright. There was never time to say much as she'd put in the minimum coinage. (Oh how times have changed regarding phone usage!) This time however it was, for the first time, my dad who'd phoned. after the usual assurance we had quite a chat but I was puzzled as I hadn't heard dad put any more coins in. 'Well I'll be blowed, thas a rummun*, summats up with the phone I reckon', he said. He'd only put in the 10p and no pips had gone or anything it just wasn't cutting off. So we just carried on talking until there was nothing left to say. Reminiscing and what not.

Oh how lucky that it was my dad who'd made the call and that it was when the phone wasn't working as it should as 2 days later he'd died of a heart attack at only 57.

Nothing could soften that blow of course I was so devasted that he wasn't going to see his grandson grow up and take him fishing with the little rod (proper one not a toy) that he'd already got for him. He was so looking forward to it. However that long phone call did something to bring a bit of peace to my emotions there had been nothing left unsaid so no regrets on that score at least.

So divine providence or just a random event that was lucky? Who knows? I hope you'll understand that I prefer the former interpretation. :)

*'Thas a rummun' Norfolk for 'that's strange'
I agree with you Sollywos - I'd think it divine providence too.

It provokes gobbets of hearsaid Shakespeare (such wisdom!), through my brain when hearing of Peculiarities such as your phone call.

A moment to treasure I'd imagine...
 

Tempest63

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We buried my mother yesterday after nearly seven weeks since she passed, first possible opportunity.
I will happily admit I have not quite been tea total since she died and I don’t know what happened to the water jug that has disappeared from next to the sink. But I have been plagued over the last few days by things moving very very quickly at the periphery of my vision. I spin expecting to see a fly or similar but there is nothing there.
I’m sure it is down to over indulgence and a complete lack of sleep in the run up to the funeral but I have never experienced this constant movement at the side of my vision.
Hopefully a couple of dry nights and some half decent sleeps will sort it out.
So the strangeness continues. Today my wife bought a replacement jug from Sainsbury, so laughing and joking I said aloud something on the line of “mum, you can keep the jug, we have a new one”.

A couple of hours later wifey opens a cupboard that we use everyday and, lo and behold, there is the missing jug. Could be we absentmindedly put the jug in the cupboard bit it was right at the back, where we rarely delve, and it had funnels in it we haven’t used in years.
EAD98221-1289-4002-896A-F300EE0AB0CD.jpeg


So this is the new jug from Sainsbury today

F75D073B-E1CB-4731-B5A0-456D3C69796C.jpeg



And this is the old one that disappeared and rematerialised today. Note the funnels inside that haven’t been used for some time.
 

Ronnie Jersey

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I know I've posted this some time ago here, but it's so strange.
A friend of mine's father passed on, and there was a very large family gathering at their house after the funeral.
The wife had gone shopping that week prior and purchased an old-fashioned telephone for the house. It was still in the box, brand new, and in the bag - it had never been opened or removed from the bag.
Everyone was having dinner and reminiscing, when suddenly this telephone started ringing. Everyone froze and did not mention it. It finally stopped ringing and they went on with their get together. But this phone was not connected to anything.
My friend was stunned, and she is not the type who believes in anything paranormal. Could it be that the man who had passed on wanted to let them all know that he was there with them? I wonder what would have happened if they had opened that box and answered the phone.
 
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