Robot Round-Up

Souleater

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Panasonic's made a robot with a knitted cover that's described as like a cat and can fart .. for reasons best explained in this link ..

NICOBO by panasonic is a cat-like robot that can fart (designboom.com)
It doesnt really explain why it is made to fart (surely the worst part of any pet, youu'll know if you've ever smelt a cat or dog fart) and it explains the farts are to expel excess air from inside it, what does it do with the air that is not excess, why did they make it take in air at all lol
 

Swifty

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It doesnt really explain why it is made to fart (surely the worst part of any pet, youu'll know if you've ever smelt a cat or dog fart) and it explains the farts are to expel excess air from inside it, what does it do with the air that is not excess, why did they make it take in air at all lol
Perhaps it's to make it more relatable to humans? .. I doubt it smells? .. who even knows anymore? ..
 

maximus otter

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Are U.S. Special Forces Quietly Using Armed Robots?

"There is a taboo about putting weapons on robots. When Dallas police killed a sniper using an improvised bomb on a robot in 2016, there was a national outcry, and the tactic has not been repeated. The same caution has long applied in the U.S. military, and any suggestion that robots will get weapons still draws a strong reaction. But Special Forces may have quietly broken this longstanding taboo.



The U.S. Army has been deploying remote-controlled weapons by the thousand. The Commonly Remotely Operated Weapon Station (CROWS) in an unmanned turret which enables an operator inside a vehicle to find and engage targets with a machinegun from under armor.



CROWS

It seems Special Forces had an urgent need for an armed robot and bypassed the existing Army projects. An R&D budget document from the Office of the Secretary of Defense reveals that Special Operation Command developed a Lightweight Remote Weapons System (LRWS), a miniature version of the CROWS turret.

“LRWS transitioned to U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) for immediate force protection of SOF operators while conducting the operational evaluation of the prototype units and will subsequently be available to all operators within the USSOCOM.” (My emphasis).

This suggests that Special Forces acquired the new remote weapon systems and are using them on unmanned vehicles for Force Protection, such as guarding a base perimeter."

https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidh...us-special-forces-quietly-using-armed-robots/

maximus otter
 

Souleater

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Are U.S. Special Forces Quietly Using Armed Robots?

"There is a taboo about putting weapons on robots. When Dallas police killed a sniper using an improvised bomb on a robot in 2016, there was a national outcry, and the tactic has not been repeated. The same caution has long applied in the U.S. military, and any suggestion that robots will get weapons still draws a strong reaction. But Special Forces may have quietly broken this longstanding taboo.



The U.S. Army has been deploying remote-controlled weapons by the thousand. The Commonly Remotely Operated Weapon Station (CROWS) in an unmanned turret which enables an operator inside a vehicle to find and engage targets with a machinegun from under armor.



CROWS

It seems Special Forces had an urgent need for an armed robot and bypassed the existing Army projects. An R&D budget document from the Office of the Secretary of Defense reveals that Special Operation Command developed a Lightweight Remote Weapons System (LRWS), a miniature version of the CROWS turret.

“LRWS transitioned to U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) for immediate force protection of SOF operators while conducting the operational evaluation of the prototype units and will subsequently be available to all operators within the USSOCOM.” (My emphasis).

This suggests that Special Forces acquired the new remote weapon systems and are using them on unmanned vehicles for Force Protection, such as guarding a base perimeter."

https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidh...us-special-forces-quietly-using-armed-robots/

maximus otter
Most of the targeting and weapons control on the apache attack helicopters can operate independant of human control, selecting and eliminating the most dangerous targets first before moving on to the next most dangerous, the useof unmanned armed drones is huge aswell, and by all accounts they are robots, albeit remote controlled.
 

EnolaGaia

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Sex robot manufacturer Lux Botics claims it can produce a robotic replica of a deceased loved one and it's working on the ability to make this clone-bot ambulatory.
Sex robot 'clones' of dead partners created with 3D scans 'could walk in near future'

A sex robot company is offering clones that can replace dead partners using groundbreaking 3D scans, the Daily Star can reveal.

Manufacturer Lux Botics says it produces “ultra-realistic humanoids” and advertises a flagship model called Stephanie.

She comes with speech control, a facial recognition function, and artificial intelligence capabilities.

However, customers who want a more familiar companion are able to recreate loved ones.

Initially, a 3D model would be created using sophisticated scans before being printed out in a “very fine resolution”.

Lux Botics can also collect photos of the individual, but the end product would not be as realistic. ...

A mould would be constructed from the 3D model, with a robotic skeleton placed inside.

The robot would be painted and fitted with lips, nails, eyebrows and all other required features.

The artists involved are expected to charge $5,000 [£3,640]-$10,000 [£7,280] for one scan, while the printing would cost $3,000 [£2,184]-$5,000. The mould would set customers back an additional $5,000. ...

Lux Botics co-founder Bjorn told the Daily Star: “We can make robots that talk but we have not made robots that truly walk on their own.

“We hope to develop this in the near future. We can make a large number of body parts that can move in a realistic manner.”

He added: “We have so far not made any body doubles but we do offer this choice for customers.” ...
FULL STORY: https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/world-news/sex-robot-clones-dead-partners-23797892
(Arguably NSFW imagery at the link.)
 

Trevp666

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I can see a problem here........there might be an instance whereby the 'ambulatory sex clone' is made before the death of the lover......

Also, what if the 'ambulatory sex clone' is made too much like the original?
I mean, have they not seen 'Mudds Women'?????
 

PeteByrdie

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That's nightmare fuel, no doubt about it.

Sex robot manufacturer Lux Botics claims it can produce a robotic replica of a deceased loved one and it's working on the ability to make this clone-bot ambulatory.


FULL STORY: https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/world-news/sex-robot-clones-dead-partners-23797892
(Arguably NSFW imagery at the link.)
Reminds one of the Black Mirror episode, 'Be Right Back'.
 

Swifty

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MercuryCrest

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Might have been posted here before, but I do love this version of Boston Dynamic's robot:
 

ramonmercado

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Treat 'em like animals.

PIGS, RATS, AND locusts have it easy these days—they can bother whoever they want.

But back in the Middle Ages, such behavior could have landed them in court. If a pig bit a child, town officials would hold a trial like they would for a person, even providing the offender with a lawyer. Getting insects to show up in court en masse was a bit more difficult, but the authorities tried anyway: They’d send someone out to yell the summons into the countryside.

That’s hilarious, yes, but also a hint at how humans might navigate a new, even more complicated relationship. Just as we can’t help but ascribe agency to animals, we also project intent, emotions, and expectations onto robots. “It has always struck me that we're constantly comparing robots to humans, and artificial intelligence to human intelligence, and I've just never found that to be the best analogy,” says MIT robotics ethicist Kate Darling, author of the upcoming book The New Breed: What Our History with Animals Reveals about Our Future With Robots. “I've always found that animals are such a great analogy to get people away from this human comparison. We understand that animals are also these autonomous beings that can sense, think, make decisions, learn. You see a more diverse range of skill and intelligence in the animal world.” ...

https://www.wired.com/story/want-to-get-along-with-robots-pretend-theyre-animals/
 

Trevp666

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I expect that at some point in the future there will be a sentient robot of some sort which commits a crime and has to be tried in a regular court.
This puts me in mind of 'I Robot', 'Bicentennial Man' and the Star Trek TNG episode in which Data has to defend his right to existence and that of his 'daughter' that he created.
There are probably other examples.
 

Souleater

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Treat 'em like animals.

PIGS, RATS, AND locusts have it easy these days—they can bother whoever they want.

But back in the Middle Ages, such behavior could have landed them in court. If a pig bit a child, town officials would hold a trial like they would for a person, even providing the offender with a lawyer. Getting insects to show up in court en masse was a bit more difficult, but the authorities tried anyway: They’d send someone out to yell the summons into the countryside.

That’s hilarious, yes, but also a hint at how humans might navigate a new, even more complicated relationship. Just as we can’t help but ascribe agency to animals, we also project intent, emotions, and expectations onto robots. “It has always struck me that we're constantly comparing robots to humans, and artificial intelligence to human intelligence, and I've just never found that to be the best analogy,” says MIT robotics ethicist Kate Darling, author of the upcoming book The New Breed: What Our History with Animals Reveals about Our Future With Robots. “I've always found that animals are such a great analogy to get people away from this human comparison. We understand that animals are also these autonomous beings that can sense, think, make decisions, learn. You see a more diverse range of skill and intelligence in the animal world.” ...

https://www.wired.com/story/want-to-get-along-with-robots-pretend-theyre-animals/
Just out of curiosity, is there a record of how many of these animal/insects actually won their court cases, my guess would be zero, rendering the whole thing a 'kangeroo court', pun intended.
 
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