Tattoos

rynner2

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Interesting article:

The rise of the Maori tribal tattoo
By Ngahuia Te Awekotuku
University of Waikato, New Zealand

Moko - the art of tattoo - has always been part of the Maori world in New Zealand. It is about beauty, and belonging. And it is much more than skin deep.

When the first European explorers came into the Pacific, they were stunned by the patterning they saw on the faces and bodies of the island peoples, from Rapanui in the east, to Hawaii in the north, the westward islands of Samoa and Tonga and in the temperate south of Aotearoa - the Maori word for New Zealand.

Their languages, myths, values were similar. Tatu, or tatau, was the word used for the adornment of the skin by pricking or cutting and then applying colour. The 18th Century mariners carried the word and the tattoo itself to the northern hemisphere.

In ancient times, male facial moko was considered a mark of adulthood and achievement, as much as an active and flattering adornment. Usually the faces of men were marked from forehead to throat, creating a mask-like effect which enhanced the bone structure, softened or strengthened the features, and confirmed the virility of the warrior or the wisdom of the shaman/orator.

Each line attests to the man's courage - taking moko is a painful and exacting process, and the Maori technique particularly so.
Unlike the other Pacific peoples who used comb-like instruments that tapped the ink into the skin, the Maori used scalpel-sharp chisels, which cut and scarred, gouging a raised pattern on the cheeks, forehead, eyelids, and chin.

No two facial moko are ever alike. It is usually gendered - a woman's facial adornment is restricted to a panel from the central forehead (rarely done today), nostrils and below to the rich darkening of the upper and lower lips, and a design on the chin continuing into the throat.

The most common choice is the chin pattern, or kauae, which persisted throughout the colonial period, and which I saw and admired as a child growing up in the 1950s. Maori women have always had facial tattoos. Despite missionary disgust, settler vilification, rude stares and comments from strangers, they have sustained the tradition.

Why? Because it is a particular aesthetic. It defines and flatters the face, it draws attention to the eyes and lips, and a particularly skilled artist can correct flawed features and offer an illusion of beauty. And the illusion is beneath the skin, in the ink, forever

etc...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-19628418
 

Zilch5

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You can still see the best Maori facial tattoos when you go to a game of the NZ "All Blacks" Rugby team.

Their fans still love them.

 

Cyclops

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I think that might be drawn on for the occasion, looking at the ink on his lips and the smudging under his ear. Not to take anything away from it - he probably has a job that precludes him wearing facial tattoo. And those are amazing designs - it must have taken ages.
 

Zilch5

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monops said:
I think that might be drawn on for the occasion, looking at the ink on his lips and the smudging under his ear. Not to take anything away from it - he probably has a job that precludes him wearing facial tattoo. And those are amazing designs - it must have taken ages.
Quite possible - it was just a random Google pic I chose. But there is the real deal out there too, believe me.
 

ally_katte

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I have a number of tattoos but I don't think they're particularly strange.

Though I'm sure there's plenty of people out there who think they are.

I've got an Alice in Wonderland piece on my forearm, thankfully I've not had any one speculate that I'm a mind control victim or whatever.
 

mrsbobbins

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Walking through Edinburgh a few weeks ago I saw a man with a fried egg on toast tattooed on his head. Quite possibly the strangest tattoo I have ever seen.
 

rynner2

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This could go in Sport, too. With photos:

When football tattoos go wrong – a warning to Arsenal striker Lukas Podolski
Lukas Podolski is so enamoured with his new home at the Emirates that he is already talking about getting the club's crest as a tattoo to go along with a similar ink he has of boyhood team Cologne. However, the German international should be warned, football fans and tattoos don't always make for happy endings.
By Telegraph Sport
11:36AM BST 21 Sep 2012

The excitement of a transfer window can do strange things to a fan. The thrilling prospect of big money signings, international stars rumoured to be joining, Sky Sports Jim White shouting from your television. It can lead to bad decisions. Very bad, in the case of Manchester City fan Chris Atkinson. The 25-year-old, back in 2009, was so convinced that Brazilian star Kaka was jointing the club that he committed the World Cup winner's name to his chest. He didn't sign, of course, opting to stay with AC Milan.

The name Robert Nesbitt might not mean anything to you. But your memory might be jogged when you're told that Robert was the man who famously got a thigh-sized tattoo of then Newcastle United striker Andy Cole drawn on his, well, thigh. The ink was barely dry before Cole had signed a deal to join rivals Manchester United. Which hurt more, he has never said.

Earlier this year one particularly 'passionate' Sheffield Wednesday fan paid his club the tribute of having a picture of the club's crest tattooed on to his back. Proudly showing off his artwork on his Facebook page to other Wednesday fans at first his loyalty was applauded ... until one eagle-eyed Owl spotted a problem. The legend that proclaimed the club's date of establishment was out by a decade, 1877 when it should have read 1867. Sympathy was limited on his very public embarrassment ...

Podolski would do well to have a word with Arsenal fan Mark Brewer should he decide to have a club crest on his body. Clubs change badges from time to time. And having a retro design may even boost your rabid fan status. But Brewer's design is not just out of date now, it's back to front. After he had the old version of Arsenal's badge pasted on his arm, the club changed crest and with it flipped the direction of the gun. It still looks right looking in a mirror though, eh?

You can have too much of a good thing. And you can certainly have too much of a bad thing. And for this Leeds United and England fan, walking in to a pre-match pub that stipulates 'no colours' is no longer an option. Words don't do it justice ...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/footba ... olski.html
 

escargot

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Blackburn shop's sales boom after offering discounts to tattooed customers

A SHOP has seen its sales boom since offering a 10 per cent discount to tattooed customers.

The initiative by Bee.com follows HMV’s strict new appearance policy banning their employees from having any body art on show.
etc

Just saw this on Granada Reports. Till staff ask customers if they have a tattoo and if the customer shows it, they get the discount. Genius!
 

Sergeant_Pluck

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Just saw this on Granada Reports. Till staff ask customers if they have a tattoo and if the customer shows it, they get the discount. Genius!
Surely this is discriminatory? Supposing they only offered the discount to, say, Jews, or lesbians, or Jewish lesbians, there'd be a right old shitstorm.

Besides, what's to stop non-tattooed people getting the hump and boycotting Bee.com now? I reckon the non-tattooed make up the majority and this has potential to end up a spectacular own goal.
 

Sergeant_Pluck

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Monstrosa said:
There sre shops that offer discounts to pensioners or students. are they sidcriminatory?
Not if there's legislation that makes it legal to offer such, no, and I see the common sense aspect in such discounts.

Nevertheless, legal or not, if I was a 'cleanskin', I'd be a bit pissed if I had to pay more for something simply because of a lifestyle choice of having no ink.
 

Heckler

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Sergeant_Pluck said:
Nevertheless, legal or not, if I was a 'cleanskin', I'd be a bit pissed if I had to pay more for something simply because of a lifestyle choice of having no ink.
Just tell them you have a Tatt on your old chap and offer to display it for all the customers if they wish.

Bish-bash-bosh, you get the discount and no-one needs to get ink scarred.
 

rynner2

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'Thugs and druggies' – what job interviewers think when they see a tattoo
A youthful, spur-of-the moment decision to get a tattoo can damage people’s career prospects for life, a study has found.
By John Bingham, Social Affairs Editor
6:30AM BST 04 Sep 2013

Research presented to the British Sociological Association found that no matter how intelligent and articulate a job applicant is, if they have a visible tattoo, most would-be employers will secretly rule them out as looking “dirty” and “unsavoury” or even “repugnant”.

Even employers who do not have a personal objection to body art would think twice about taking on someone with a tattoo because they fear it would damage their corporate image.

But the study adds that those stuck with a tattoo from youth could turn it to their advantage – as long as they want to become a prison officer. 8)
And it concludes that a small number of types of tattoo can be seen as conveying a positive image, such as regimental insignia for military veterans, which can be a “badge of honour”.

In a paper, being presented to the association’s annual conference on workplace issues, Dr Andrew Timming of St Andrew’s University School of Management, set out findings from a series of interviews with employers about perceptions of body art.

He spoke to a cross section of managers from organisations including a hotel, bank, city council, prison, university and bookseller.
Most said that tattoos carried a clear “stigma” for employers, with several expressing strong views on the subject.
“Respondents expressed concern that visibly tattooed workers may be perceived by customers to be ‘abhorrent’, ‘repugnant’, ‘unsavoury’ and ‘untidy’,” said Dr Timming.
“It was surmised that customers might project a negative service experience based on stereotypes that tattooed people are thugs and druggies.”

One male manager interviewed told Dr Timming: “Tattoos are the first thing they [fellow recruiters] talk about when the person has gone out of the door.”
A woman added: “They make a person look dirty”.

Dr Timming said bosses’ concerns were usually based on perceptions of what their organisation’s clients might think.
“Hiring managers realise that, ultimately, it does not matter what they think of tattoos – what really matters, instead, is how customers might perceive employees with visible tattoos,” he said.

“The one qualification to this argument is there are certain industries in which tattoos may be a desirable characteristic in a job interview.
“For example, an HR manager at a prison noted that tattoos on guards can be ‘something to talk about’ and ‘an in’ that you need to make a connection with the prisoners.”
But he added that some images were easier for employers to forgive than others.

While in many cases flowers or small animals might just be acceptable for some, those most likely to prove a definite turn-off included spider’s webs on people's necks, tears tattooed on to their faces, guns and sexual imagery.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/jobs ... attoo.html
 

Analogue Boy

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A tattoo affecting your career prospects is old thinking.
I've never bothered having one done myself. As an artist, I've never been in love with someone else's work SO much I want to wear it for the rest of my life. However, a huge percentage of the people I work with sport tattoos. It's the right work environment for that sort of thing but what was once considered a daring act of individuality has turned into a very large tribal thing to the extent where not having a tattoo will mark you out as an individual in future.

The are loads of sites featuring bad tattoos and it has to be said that these tattoos give a clear warning that the bearer is - how can I put this? - someone who doesn't quite think things through.
 

CarlosTheDJ

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I'm definitely in the minority amongst my friends and colleagues as I have no tattoos or piercings.

Mainly cos I'm a wimp.
 

Analogue Boy

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CarlosTheDJ said:
The police don't have a problem with tattoos nowadays - unless they are offensive or inflammatory, obviously.

...which gets me thinking about really useful tattoos that could perhaps warn if the bearer is socially corrosive for example.

 

GNC

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Nah, I wouldn't get a tattoo - again. The spider web design across my face is enough.
 

GNC

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S-L-A-D-E across my knuckles was a mistake, however.
 
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