The Bermuda Triangle

Mythopoeika

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Old_Shoe

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My limited understanding of the green flash phenomenon is that it happens mostly in the tropical latitudes, and very rarely, at that. It happens at sunset as the rays from the sun cross the atmosphere at just the right angle with just the right conditions. The atmosphere acts like a prism and bends the light rays into a giant rainbow of colors. The colors are all briefly visible, but only the color green really stands out as much different than the ambient light conditions and that's what you see as the flash.
 

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Old_Shoe said:
My limited understanding of the green flash phenomenon is that it happens mostly in the tropical latitudes, and very rarely, at that. It happens at sunset as the rays from the sun cross the atmosphere at just the right angle with just the right conditions. The atmosphere acts like a prism and bends the light rays into a giant rainbow of colors. The colors are all briefly visible, but only the color green really stands out as much different than the ambient light conditions and that's what you see as the flash.
I thought of the Green Flash, but descriptions of the green flare are different:
I've never seen one, myself. I've only heard descriptions and it's always simply a green flare in the distance that rises up and arcs back down again and disappears. It looks like a flare shot from a Very pistol.
It might well have been. Signals, perhaps in a secret military exercise, hence the insistence that "you ain't seen nothing, roight!" to the look-outs.
 

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The Bermuda Triangle: Whatever became of the myth
Seventy years after the disappearance of five planes in the Atlantic, Giles Milton investigates one of the world’s most enduring aviation mysteries
By Giles Milton

8:00PM GMT 04 Dec 2015

The message picked up by the control tower was as bizarre as it was alarming. “Everything looks strange,” said the pilot. “It looks like we’re entering white water. We’re completely lost.”
There were a few more crackles and then silence. It was December 5, 1945, and the five airplanes of Flight 19 – a routine military training mission departing from Fort Lauderdale, Florida – had vanished without trace.

For the last 70 years, the disappearance of Flight 19 has been one of the world’s most enduring aviation mysteries. No wreckage was ever found, despite an extensive search, and nor were any bodies recovered. It was as if the planes and their 14 crewmen had simply disappeared into thin air.

In the absence of any hard facts, there was frenzied speculation as to what might have happened. There was also – before long – the birth of an extraordinary myth. The fate of the planes was linked to an area of ocean that became known as the Bermuda Triangle, in which unexplained and seemingly paranormal incidents occurred with alarming frequency.

Now, seven decades after the disappearance of Flight 19, the truth about both the planes and the Bermuda Triangle can finally be revealed.
It is a tale of fantasy, duplicity and wishful thinking – one that was to bring enormous wealth to a handful of individuals. And it all began on that December evening.

Within hours of the five Avenger planes disappearing from the radar, a PBM-Mariner seaplane was sent on a search-and-rescue mission. The Mariner’s pilot made a routine radio call at 7.30pm indicating his position. It was the last call he ever made. Soon afterwards, the Mariner also vanished from the radar, just as the five Avengers had done. Neither the plane, nor her 13-strong crew, was ever seen again.

The disappearance of six planes in one day was mysterious enough, but the losses were by no means at an end. A further three planes went missing in the same area in 1948 and 1949 and a pleasure yacht, the Connemara IV, was found adrift and without its crew in 1955. Just a few years later, two USA Air Force Stratotankers also disappeared.

. . . . .

Seventy years after the disappearance of Flight 19, the truth about what happened can finally be unravelled. At the time of the loss, much attention was focussed on the skill of the squadron’s leader, Lieutenant Charles Taylor. An accomplished pilot with 2,500 hours of flying experience, he had an unblemished track record as an instructor. His student pilots were also highly capable, having clocked up some 300 hours of flying time.

Nor were there any reported problems with the aircraft. They were fully fuelled and had passed all their pre-flight checks. They took off without incident at 2.10pm and were soon heading due east, towards Abaco Island in the northern Bahamas.

Snatches of the radio conversations between the aircrews allow for a partial reconstruction of that afternoon’s flight. At around 3.40pm, one of the crew was heard asking for a compass reading.
“I don’t know where we are,” was the response. “We must have got lost after that last turn.” Minutes later, Lt Taylor was heard to say: “Both my compasses are out and I am trying to find Fort Lauderdale, Florida.”

He attempted to locate his position by studying the islands below. “I am over land but it is broken,” he said. “I am sure I’m in the [Florida] Keys, but I don’t know how far down.”

A dissenting voice was heard on the radio. “Dammit, if we could just fly west, we would get home. Head west, dammit.” Someone on board, it seems, knew that they were on course for disaster.

The Fort Lauderdale ground staff made frantic efforts to contact Lt Taylor, but their messages were not picked up. They eventually managed to triangulate Flight 19’s position and it was most alarming. The planes were north of the Bahamas, miles from land.

“All planes, close up tight,” radioed Taylor at 6.20pm. “We’ll have to ditch unless landfall. When the first plane drops below 10 gallons, we all go down together.”

The final moments of Flight 19 must remain as speculation: despite extensive seabed searches, the planes were never found. They presumably ditched into the sea, where conditions had deteriorated since they left Fort Lauderdale. The choppy waves would have soon swallowed the heavy Avengers.

The US Navy immediately opened an investigation into the missing Avengers, as well as the PBM-Mariner sent to search for them. This latter plane was widely held to have exploded in mid-air – a hypothesis reinforced by the testimony of Captain Shonna Stanley of the SS Gaines Mills: he saw a ball of fire in the sky at exactly the time when the search plane went missing.

As for the Avengers, it was concluded that human error and compass malfunction caused the tragedy. Lieutenant Taylor had wrongly believed himself to be over the Florida Keys; each change of course took his formation further out to sea. And although he had clocked up many flying hours, he had previously been based in Miami and was unfamiliar with the Fort Lauderdale topography.

One by one, the Bermuda Triangle’s supposed mysteries have been solved. The Connemara IV’s crew was not abducted by aliens. The ship was washed out to sea (without its crew) during a hurricane. And the two missing Stratotankers collided and crashed in the Atlantic.

When Lloyds of London was asked to investigate losses in the Bermuda Triangle, they found no evidence to suggest that they were higher than in any other area of ocean. The United States Coast Guard concurred: it said that losses over the years have been negligible when compared to the number of vessels and airplanes that regularly traverse the area.

Such prosaic explanations were never going to satisfy the conspiracy theorists. Vincent Gaddis refused to accept the investigation’s findings into Flight 19 and set to work on his supposition that supernatural forces were responsible. “Whatever this menace that lurks within a triangle of tragedy so close to home, it was responsible for the most incredible mystery in the history of aviation.”

The fact that Flight 19’s compasses were faulty, that Lieutenant Taylor was lost and that the planes had run out of fuel, was of little matter. The planes had disappeared. And the Bermuda Triangle was born.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/12031649/Whatever-happened-to-the-Bermuda-Triangle.html

Pictures, map, on page.
 
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EnolaGaia

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As for the Avengers, it was concluded that human error and compass malfunction caused the tragedy. Lieutenant Taylor had wrongly believed himself to be over the Florida Keys; each change of course took his formation further out to sea. And although he had clocked up many flying hours, he had previously been based in Miami and was unfamiliar with the Fort Lauderdale topography.
I find this last comment somewhat bizarre. Fort Lauderdale is only some 20 - 25 miles north of Miami.
 

Peripart

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An interesting summary. And I've read similar takes on the story elsewhere, which rule out any idea that this area of sea is more deadly than any other.

One version I recall said that, in all likelihood, there was nothing wrong with Flight 19's compasses - Taylor mistook the Bahamas for the Florida Keys, and thereafter, refused to believe the evidence of his instruments or the flight controllers.

Still, so long as Flight 19's final whereabouts remain unknown, the speculation will continue, and why not? It's still a great tale!
 

JamesWhitehead

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"[Charles] Berlitz's book has been blasted out of the water time after time not for being inaccurate or careless but for being a great steaming heap of lies. Some ships appear to have been made up while others were wrecked thousands of miles away!"

. . . said one disappointed reader on the first page of this thread.

It's not as if he was just relying on bad sources - he was a bad source!

It's not as if he needed the dosh, either: he was, I gather, heir to the language-course fortune. If he felt he needed to prove something, he had the commercial sense to pull off his trick with a catchy title at a time before everyone could be their own fact-checker. :p
 

Peripart

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I bet I've still got his book somewhere, along with my slightly dog-eared copy of Arthur C. Clarke's Mysterious World. 30 years later, it's not hard to say which one I respect more as a source of information... that said, the teenage me would have lapped up Charles Berlitz's tales!
 

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My favourite mission on the brilliant Microsoft Flight Simulator FSX was "Lost in The Triangle". I did manage to complete it a few months ago on my third attempt, but didn't get a glimpse of the rumoured ghost ship or other supernatural stuff. Loved the way the storm crept in and my aircraft's instrumentation became unreliable though. Gives you a really palpable feeling of being there. Must try it again soon.
 

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My limited understanding of the green flash phenomenon is that it happens mostly in the tropical latitudes, and very rarely, at that.
Albert Camus mentions this a couple of times in 'L’Étranger' (set in Algeria), clearly expecting the reader to be familiar with green sunset phenomena. we 'did' this book at school and our teacher seemed to know what he was on about too, whereas we were all baffled.
 

JamesWhitehead

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The Green Flash is the subject of a 1986 film by Eric Rohmer.

The Green Ray was its English title. Guarding against any Sci-Fi expectations, it was renamed Summer in the USA.

It does feature footage of the phenomenon - Rohmer went to the Canaries to film it. The heroine is intrigued by Jules Verne's 1882 novel, Le rayon vert.



SPOILER ALERT
It may come as a blessed relief when the ray finally arrives - unless you are enchanted by the minutiae of a "difficult" young Parisian woman's holiday arrangements. :cool:
 
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Zeke Newbold

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My limited understanding of the green flash phenomenon is that it happens mostly in the tropical latitudes, and very rarely, at that. It happens at sunset as the rays from the sun cross the atmosphere at just the right angle with just the right conditions. The atmosphere acts like a prism and bends the light rays into a giant rainbow of colors. The colors are all briefly visible, but only the color green really stands out as much different than the ambient light conditions and that's what you see as the flash.
Yes, the green flash is a well established astronomical phenomenon. I first got news of it as a kid when it was mentioned in a Introduction to Astronomy type-thing by Patrick Moore.

My understanding of it is that, as the sun appears to descend to the horizon, there is a brief period when the light has to travel through an increased amount of atmosphere - and so the colour of the light, for a very brief period,changes to the next `frequency` which is green.

And - you don't have to live in the tropics to see it! Anywhere with clear skies and a long flat horizon will do. i grew up in Southport (a U.K town on the northwest coastline) and it could be seen there - when looking over the Irish sea from the beaches -from time to time. I myself never saw it but my parents, who are about as non-Fortean as you can get - did.
 

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The Bermuda Hexagon
A perfect storm of sensationalist, ratings-driven science TV, and extremely lazy click-driven journalism resulted in a viral story that explains literally nothing about the “Bermuda Triangle”.

by Alex Kasprak

Oct 25, 2016


CLAIM: Satellite images of hexagon-shaped holes in clouds above the Bermuda Triangle prove that large blasts of sinking air are the cause of mysterious shipwrecks and plane crashes in the area.

FALSE


ORIGIN:
On 26 April 2016, the Science Channel premiered an episode of their show “What on Earth?” that (in part) purported to explain the disappearances of ships and planes in the area known as the Bermuda Triangle through a natural meteorological phenomenon known as microbursts.

Though the Science Channel has heavily promoted an online video of that segment on social media since May 2016, it became a viral news story when the news outlets such as the UK's Daily Mail and Mirror Online picked it up as a new “finding” on 21 October 2016:

The mystery behind the Bermuda Triangle may have finally been cracked. The 500,000 km square stretch in the North Atlantic Ocean has been blamed for the disappearance of at least 75 planes and hundreds of ships over the centuries. But scientists claim the truth behind the “deadly triangle” is all down to hexagonal clouds that create terrifying 170 mph winds[sic] air bombs. It is believed these deadly blasts of air can flip over ships and bring planes crashing into the ocean.

The logic behind the actual Science Channel segment that this claim is based on, if it is a cohesive argument at all, can be summarized as follows:

  1. A NASA satellite took a picture of some hexagon-shaped gaps in clouds over Bermuda.
  2. Another satellite, which had the additional ability to map ocean waves and winds, has captured the same type of clouds over the North Sea, and they were associated with big waves and heavy winds.
  3. Meteorologists say this pattern is the signature of a real phenomenon called a microburst that creates strong winds.
  4. The mystery of the Bermuda Triangle is solved!
When both the Daily Mail and the Mirror Online reported this story in October 2016, they used quotes from theScience Channel segment in a way that suggested they had performed original reporting to verify the claims made in the video. One quote, from Arizona State University climatologist Randall Cerveny, explained the mechanics of a downburst while putting the term "air bomb" into play:

These types of hexagonal shapes over the ocean are in essence air bombs. They are formed by what are called microbursts and they’re blasts of air that come down out of the bottom of a cloud and then hit the ocean and then create waves that can sometimes be massive in size as they start to interact with each other.

Another quote, from Colorado State University satellite meteorologist Steve Miller, turned a mundane scientific statement into a tantalizing mystery:

You don’t typically see straight edges with clouds. Most of the time, clouds are random in their distribution.

Both statements are factual. However, neither scientist claimed that the mechanism they were describing had any explanatory power for the purported anomalous number of disappearances of ships and planes in the area. In a 21 October 2016 USA Today article, both scientists suggested their comments had beenmisrepresented by the Science Channel: ...

http://www.snopes.com/scientists-solve-bermuda-triangle/?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social
 

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I thought the Bermuda Triangle had been debunked years ago. Well, it had, but it seems its fame precedes it so that it rises from its watery grave intermittently.
 

Swifty

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I thought the Bermuda Triangle had been debunked years ago. Well, it had, but it seems its fame precedes it so that it rises from its watery grave intermittently.
I remember someone explaining it all away as some sort of marshy gas bubbles being 'burped' up from the sea bed that pulled the aircraft down.
 

EnolaGaia

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I thought the Bermuda Triangle had been debunked years ago. Well, it had, but it seems its fame precedes it so that it rises from its watery grave intermittently.
It's still the case that the Bermuda Triangle's prescribed area does not cover any statistically extraordinary number of disappearances.
 

GNC

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It's still the case that the Bermuda Triangle's prescribed area does not cover any statistically extraordinary number of disappearances.
I wonder if the bloke who dreamt it up gets royalties, or if it's a Dan Brown/Holy Blood, Holy Grail affair?
 

JamesWhitehead

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I wonder if the bloke who dreamt it up gets royalties
Charles Berlitz Junior has been dead for nearly thirteen years. The phrase Bermuda Triangle would be hard to copyright, consisting as it does of a place and a shape. It seemed catchy enough to escape into the land of dodgy newspaper stories early on and it was all good publicity for the 1974 book.

Spookily enough, Berlitz nearly lost the copyright on his own name when his grandfather's language-school business was sold! :eek:
 

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I was just joking, but that was a genuinely interesting answer. You never know what you'll stumble across on here.
 

EnolaGaia

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Charles Berlitz Junior has been dead for nearly thirteen years. The phrase Bermuda Triangle would be hard to copyright, consisting as it does of a place and a shape. ...
Berlitz is the most famous author associated with the Bermuda Triangle, and AFAIK his 1974 book was the first to use the phrase in a book title.

However, the Bermuda Triangle label apparently dates a decade further back (circa 1964) to Vincent Gaddis, writing in Argosy magazine. To the best of my knowledge, Gaddis was the first to dub it 'Bermuda Triangle' (his article was entitled 'The Deadly Bermuda Triangle').

AFAIK George X. Sand was the first writer to specify and focus upon a geographic area as the scene for, and possibly somehow the cause of, such unexplained incidents (Fate magazine, 1952). Sand was the first to describe this area as a triangle whose vertices correlated with Bermuda, Puerto Rico, and Florida.
 

sherbetbizarre

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Channel 5 have three shows over the next three nights - THE BERMUDA TRIANGLE ENIGMA

Their website says "Documentary series exploring the truth about one of the world's most famous mysteries."

...and that's it. They sure know how to sell it!
 

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The interesting point here is that, whilst this seems to be a `popular acience` type debunking exercise, the existence of a dangerous area which coud be called `the Bermuda Triangle` is taken as read.

I thought that the way triangle lore was tackled nowadays was through denying that such an area (in the sense of somewhere more hazardous than other zones of maritime navigation) can be said to exist at all.There is an oft-quoted statistic to the effect that Lloyds of London (or somesuch insurers anyway) refuse to give special rates to those travelling through the triangle - on the grounds that there is no significant statistical risk in doing so.

But I suppose if the Triangle is a recent concoction then there would be no point in producing lavish on-location documentaries about it - even `it's all just human error and waves` type ones.
 

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Watched the "all new" Channel 4 documentary about the disappearance of flight 19 last night.
Didn't really add anything new, but reinforces the most common view about failed compasses and flight leader Taylor believing they were flying over the Florida Keys when they were much further East. Only thing really worth watching was recreating parts of the flight in a flight sim and then in a light aircraft (but the presenter's exaggerated demeanour was somewhat irritating). The simulation of a Fata Morgana in a fish tank was quite interesting.
 

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Scientists Claim They've Solved The Bermuda Triangle Mystery

Authored by Mac Slavo via SHTFplan.com,

Have scientists finally solved the mystery of the Bermuda triangle?

The infamous body of water in the western part of the North Atlantic Ocean stretches 270,271 square miles between Florida, Bermuda, and Puerto-Rico.

The Bermuda Triangle has been the source of many strange occurrences and mysteries involving both aircraft and boats. It is also known as the Devil’s Triangle and the area features multiple shipping lanes and has claimed over 1,000 lives in the last 100 years. But scientists think they have finally figured out why this continues to happen.

According to Fox News, experts at the University of Southampton believe the mystery can be explained by a natural phenomenon known as “rogue waves.”

Appearing on aChannel 5 documentary “The Bermuda Triangle Enigma,” the scientists used indoor simulators to re-create the monster water surges. These waves, some of which measure 100 feet high, only last for a few minutes. They were first observed by satellites in 1997 off the coast of South Africa and are often seen as the source of so many lost ships.
The research team built a model of the USS Cyclops, a huge vessel which went missing in the triangle in 1918 claiming 300 lives and used it in their indoors simulator. Because of its sheer size and flat base, it did not take long before the model is overcome with water during the simulation, according to Fox News.


Dr. Simon Boxall, an ocean and earth scientist, claims that the Bermuda Triangle area in the Atlantic can see three massive storms coming together from different directions, making the perfect conditions for a rogue wave. Such a massive surge in water could snap a boat, such as the USS Cyclops, into two pieces, said Boxall.

“There are storms to the south and north, which come together. And if there are additional ones from Florida, it can be a potentially deadly formation of rogue waves,” Boxall added.

“They [the rogue waves] are steep, they are high – we’ve measured waves in excess of 30 meters (98 feet),” said Boxall.

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-08-03/scientists-claim-theyve-solved-bermuda-triangle-mystery
 
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EnolaGaia

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In one of the most recent news story postings (within the last few days) I noticed the use of a non-standard illustration for the Bermuda Triangle's vertices. That illustration (carrying a UPI logo, and otherwise uncredited) was apparently removed from the article after I first saw it. I've found the same picture listed as a stock product from Getty Images:

images.jpeg

This version seems to place one vertex in the vicinity of Norfolk rather than Miami.

I'd read that early writers jumping onto the Bermuda Triangle bandwagon from the 1960's onward didn't always define or circumscribe the 'Devil's Triangle' in the manner we always see today (i.e., as defined by Gaddis and Berlitz). The illustration above (which is 'vintage') seems to support the claim of divergent geographical specifications decades ago.

Can anyone else provide evidence of other such past variant definitions for the triangle's location or area of effect?
 

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I don't have my copy to hand but I recall Christopher Pick (ed) 'Mysteries of the World', 1979, has an odd map of the triangle, showing it as trapezoid with a fairly long top line.
 

EnolaGaia

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I don't have my copy to hand but I recall Christopher Pick (ed) 'Mysteries of the World', 1979, has an odd map of the triangle, showing it as trapezoid with a fairly long top line.
I've seen trapezoidal / quadrilateral boundaries illustrated for the Bermuda Triangle (and / or associated areas of weirdness), but usually in the broader context of anomalous areas (most often areas of anomalous electromagnetic phenomena) plotted worldwide.

Here (below) are a couple of representative illustrations of these areas (aka 'vile vortices') distributed around the planet.

Could the Pick illustration you recall have been something configured to show this more global 'vile vortex' context?

(I'm curious, because I don't recall seeing any vile vortex literature as far back as 1979.)

2 copy 2.jpg


history-of-the-world-grid-theory-energy-map.gif

 

ghughesarch

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I've seen trapezoidal / quadrilateral boundaries illustrated for the Bermuda Triangle (and / or associated areas of weirdness), but usually in the broader context of anomalous areas (most often areas of anomalous electromagnetic phenomena) plotted worldwide.

Here (below) are a couple of representative illustrations of these areas (aka 'vile vortices') distributed around the planet.

Could the Pick illustration you recall have been something configured to show this more global 'vile vortex' context?

(I'm curious, because I don't recall seeing any vile vortex literature as far back as 1979.)

No, the Pick book was aimed at mass market types and 8 year olds like me, it didn't go into that sort of detail, after all, there were stigmata, the Shroud, Stonehenge, UFOs, Nessie and everything else to get through, in less than 200 pages. It's just that the fact it so obviously wasn't a triangle that, perhaps, led me to be a bit more questioning. I'd heard of the Bermuda Triangle before, but I'm pretty sure this was the first time I'd seen it mapped - and it wasn't a triangle!
 

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One of the disappeared ships sometimes associated with the Bermuda Triangle mythos - the SS Cotopaxi - seems to not be MIA anymore.
Ship linked to Bermuda Triangle mystery found 95 years after it vanished, explorer says

An underwater explorer believes he's found the wreck of a ship that vanished nearly a century ago. The SS Cotopaxi was thought to have disappeared in the Bermuda Triangle in 1925, but in a new TV show for the Science Channel, Michael Barnette concluded it sank off the north Florida coast.

The steam-powered bulk carrier left from Charleston, South Carolina, for Havana on November 29, 1925, with 32 passengers on board, according to the Science Channel. The ship never made it to Cuba, and none of the bodies of anyone on board were recovered.

Barnette enlisted a British historian, Guy Walters, to look for new information about the lost ship. He found records from the Cotopaxi's insurance broker saying that the ship sent distress signals on December 1, 1925.

The distress signals were received in Jacksonville, Florida, the Science Channel said. Barnette went to Florida to conduct more research and concluded the wreck of the Cotopaxi was found nearly 35 years ago off the coast of St. Augustine, Florida.

According to the National Ocean Service, the port city is north of the Bermuda Triangle, a part of the Atlantic Ocean generally located between Miami, Bermuda and San Juan, Puerto Rico. The Science Channel will show Barnette's journey to the Cotopaxi in the series premiere of "Shipwreck Secrets" on February 9.
SOURCE: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/bermud...ound-ship-that-vanished-nearly-100-years-ago/
 
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