The Dangers Of Karaoke

rynner2

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#1
no dogs or llamas, but it is about high-pitched singing:
Karaoke songs bring a lump to the throat

Richard Lloyd Parry in Tokyo
For some it is an instrument of torture, for millions of others around the world a glorious outlet for unrecognised musical genius.

But the world of karaoke has been stricken by a fearful epidemic that threatens to silence Japan’s bars and the caterwauling of millions of amateur vocalists.

Japanese doctors report a surge in the condition known as “karaoke polyp”, a growth on the vocal cords caused by excessive warbling in bars and parlours. Formerly an affliction of middle-aged businessmen, the malady has spread among housewives and young people because of the continuing popularity of karaoke.

Ear, nose and throat clinics report a doubling in cases of karaoke polyps and the operation necessary to remove them. A surge of popular songs of especially high pitch, which put excessive strain on the vocal cords, is being blamed for the polyp plague.

The condition is exacerbated by the cold, dry Japanese winter, also a time for traditional end-of-the-year parties that frequently end in enthusiastic karaoke.

“I believe that the recent increase of popular songs with many high notes is causing this,” Ryuichi Mochizuki, head of the otolaryngology department of Osaka Kaisei Hospital, told the Asahi newspaper.

“When you sing a high note, your vocal cord is pulled back and forth and vibrates more vigorously than when you sing at a lower pitch. When such a note is sustained, it adds to the burden on the vocal cords.”

Karaoke machines, which play a background musical track of songs and display their lyrics on a video screen, are found in bars, private karaoke rooms and homes all over Japan. The first machines appeared in the 1970s and karaoke polyp was identified by Hiroyuki Fukuda, of the International Medical Welfare College, Tokyo, ten years later.

Thre are 47 million Japanese who indulge their passion every year in 133,000 karaoke rooms, although the numbers are down from the peaks of the late 1990s. It was in those days that psychologists identified another disorder associated with the craze: karaokephobia, or trembling, sweating and stomach cramps induced by the prospect of being forced unwillingly to sing in public.

Polyps of the vocal cords can also afflict teachers, clergymen, actors, lawyers and other professionals who spend a lot of time speaking out loud.

Humans have two vocal cords, each 1.5cm (0.6in) long, that vibrate against each other to produce speech. In normal conversation they vibrate a few hundred times a second. A soprano hitting a high note, however, can produce 1,200 vibrations a second, and such a pitch can damage the untrained throat.

The vocal cords can rub each other raw, causing polyps on one or both sides. Tobacco smoke and alcohol, traditional elements of the karaoke experience, increase the chances of this happening. The symptoms are huskiness and, occasionally, breathing difficulties, although not usually pain. Polyps can clear up of their own accord but if they harden they may require surgery to remove them.

One Japanese clinic, the Osaka Voice Centre, receives 20 patients with karaoke polyp every month and has performed surgery on 170 amateur singers last year, double the number in 2004. Doctors say that the only way to avoid the polyp is to exercise moderation — three full-throated karaoke songs in one evening are enough for the untrained voice.

Karaokeists should also stay within their vocal range, they say. Lower-pitched, growlier songs by the likes of Leonard Cohen and Bob Dylan are kinder to the vocal cords than those of high-risk musicians such as the Bee Gees.

The good news is that karaoke polyps are not dangerous and a timely throat examination can reveal other, more serious health problems at an early stage. “If your voice becomes hoarse and it keeps cracking, you must visit your doctor,” says Kazuhiko Goto, of the Osaka Medical Association, which offers health advice for karaoke enthusiasts on its website.

“It can lead to the diagnosis of diseases such as cancer of the larynx at an early stage.”

High risk

Last week’s karaoke Top Ten. Song with asterisk is dangerously high-pitched

1 * Crescent Moon by Ayaka

2 * Love Song by Shonan Wind

3 * Lovers Again by Exile

4 * Beyond 1000 Nights by Aqua Timez

5 * Cherry Blossom by Small Bag

6 Sky Boat by Tokio

7 * Let’s Meet Again by Seamo

8 * Sign by Mr Children

9 Dogwood by Hito Toyo

10 Powder Snow by Remio Romen

After the music, time to face the check-up

Dr Thomas Stuttaford

It used to be known as the sergeant-major’s voice but now the hoarse, rasping, breathy voice associated with heavy drinkers and smokers is known as a karaoke throat.

Vocal cords that are abused by yelling and shouting — as on the parade ground or by singing too loudly, particularly singing high notes, in British pubs or in Japan — develop nodules and polyps.

Similarly, irritating the cords by inhaling tobacco smoke, or alcohol fumes that rise up through the airways from the stomach and oesophagus, may cause the same condition. Any patient who is hoarse for more than three weeks should consult a doctor so that an ear, nose and throat specialist can do a biopsy of any nodules and polyps to make certain that none is malignant.

Benign karaoke nodules can be removed either by standard microsurgical excision or, increasingly, by laser surgery.

Although a laryngeal nodule is not premalignant, exposure to smoke and alcohol, rather than boisterous singing or shouting, may cause laryngeal malignancies, one form of which may arise on the cords, and this possibility must always be excluded.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_a ... 421249.ece
 

Vardoger

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Man shot dead for bad karaoke
Thursday May 31 17:49 AEST

A jobless man was shot dead by a security guard for singing out of tune in a Philippine karaoke bar, police said Thursday.

Romy Baligula, 29, was halfway through his song on Tuesday night in a bar in San Mateo town, east of Manila, when 43-year-old security guard Robilito Ortega yelled that he was out of tune.

As Baligula ignored his comments and continued singing, Ortega pulled out his revolver and shot him in the chest.

Senior Superintendent Felipe Rojas said Baligula died instantly.

The security guard was detained by an off-duty policeman shortly after the shooting.

Deaths and violence are not uncommon in Philippine karaoke bars.

The popular Frank Sinatra song "My Way" has been taken off many karaoke bars in Manila after it was found to be the cause of fights and even deaths when patrons sang out of tune.
Article link

Commentary: If the body guard wanted to hear people singing in tune he should have gotten a job at a night club, not a karaoke bar.
 

feen5

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A suitable punishment if you ask me, Karaoke has an awful lot to answer for. And yes i do know it can be a bit of a laugh but karaoke leads to unspeakable horrors. In particular it makes some people believe that the really can sing and they never stop inflicting their voices on others. Shootings to good for em if you ask me.
 

OneWingedBird

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#4
Maybe this could be the next big thing in the US. Special karaoke nights for postal workers :shock:
 

Vardoger

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#5
Seems like they have lowered the criteria for Fortean News Stories since three of my posts recently has been moved over here.
 

sonofajoiner

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feen5 said:
A suitable punishment if you ask me, Karaoke has an awful lot to answer for. And yes i do know it can be a bit of a laugh but karaoke leads to unspeakable horrors. In particular it makes some people believe that the really can sing and they never stop inflicting their voices on others. Shootings to good for em if you ask me.
It would certainly liven up Pop Idol. :D
 

Yithian

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Chinese toddler's karaoke tantrum ends in bloodbath

Malcolm Moore in Beijing
11:51AM BST 30 Aug 2012


The evening began jovially enough when Mr Yun, the owner of a noodle shop in the central Chinese city of Xi'an, invited his family to celebrate Qixi, China's Valentine's Day, with a singing session at a local karaoke parlour.

But by 11pm, there was discord in the room. Mr Yun's four-year-old son was hogging the microphone and his parents were indulging him.

Two of the boy's uncles began chastising Mr Yun and his wife for having raised a spoilt child; a "Little Emperor", as the Chinese say.

According to the Xi'an police, the argument became heated to the point where the two uncles began pushing, and then punching, Mr Yun.

Finally, Mr Yun's nephew, who also worked in the noodle shop, ran back to the restaurant and fetched a meat cleaver.

The man, named as Mr Hui, hacked the two uncles to death, inflicting at least ten wounds on each uncle. He has since been arrested.

There is no shortage of criticism inside China for the bad behaviour of the Little Emperors, the children raised under the one-child policy and doted on by their parents.

Karaoke, meanwhile, is taken very seriously not just in China, but throughout Asia, where singing rivals alcohol as a social lubricant.

Other karaoke massacres have taken place in the Philippines, where the Frank Sinatra song "My Way" has had to be removed from many songbooks after sub-standard renditions provoked a string of killings.

In Thailand, meanwhile, a man shot eight of his neighbours, including his brother-in-law, after tiring of their tuneless reprisals of John Denver's "Country Roads".

In the United States, a woman punched a man for continuing to sing Coldplay's "Yellow" after she had told him he was not up to the task.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... dbath.html
A Chinese-Restaurant Karaoke Massacre? Let the punning commence!
 

JamesWhitehead

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#9
Restaurant workers often seem to take up fearsome weapons when trouble breaks out.

I once saw a thug lose an eye, after getting nasty with a waiter who refused his drunken party a table. Just a broomstick, in this case, but wielded with devastating precision. Perhaps they train? :eek!!!!:
 

Yithian

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#11
A cleaver: like a chop-chop-chop stick.
The uncles were right, mind. You shouldn't panda to little brats like this.
 

oldrover

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Other karaoke massacres have taken place in the Philippines, where the Frank Sinatra song "My Way" has had to be removed from many songbooks after sub-standard renditions provoked a string of killings.

In Thailand, meanwhile, a man shot eight of his neighbours, including his brother-in-law, after tiring of their tuneless reprisals of John Denver's "Country Roads".
Bloody hell.
 

EnolaGaia

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If your karaoke singing isn't enough to make other people hurt you, there's always the chance you'll hurt yourself ...
Too Much Karaoke Sent a Man to the Hospital with a Collapsed Lung

When some people perform karaoke, they sing their hearts out. But one man in eastern China took it a little further than that. He sang for so long and with such intensity that he experienced a collapsed lung.

After performing 10 consecutive songs — all with very high notes — the 65-year-old suffered from chest pains and had difficulty breathing, the South China Morning Post (SCMP) reported on August 8.

The man, identified by the surname Wang, visited a hospital in Nanchang county the next day; doctors told him that his lung had collapsed, a condition known as pneumothorax. Dr. Peng Bin-fei, one of the emergency room physicians, said that Wang's lung collapsed "because of the high lung pressure caused by singing high notes," SCMP reported. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.livescience.com/collapsed-lung-karaoke.html
 
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