The International Space Station (ISS)

Mythopoeika

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I hope they actually build Babylon-5 or Deep Space Nine.
 

ramonmercado

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9 cm, a tad much.

A Japanese astronaut who is living on the International Space Station says he has grown 9cm (3.5in) since arriving there just over three weeks ago.

Norishige Kanai wrote on social media he was worried he would not fit into the seat of the Russian Soyuz vehicle that is due to bring him home in June.

Astronauts grow an average of between two and five centimetres in space.

This is because of the absence of gravity which allows the vertebrae in their spines to spread apart.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-42618786
 

GNC

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Can you grab astronauts in space and pull their arms apart to twice their normal length like Stretch Armstrong?
 

ramonmercado

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9 cm, a tad much.

A Japanese astronaut who is living on the International Space Station says he has grown 9cm (3.5in) since arriving there just over three weeks ago.

Norishige Kanai wrote on social media he was worried he would not fit into the seat of the Russian Soyuz vehicle that is due to bring him home in June.

Astronauts grow an average of between two and five centimetres in space.

This is because of the absence of gravity which allows the vertebrae in their spines to spread apart.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-42618786
I wonder if he gets his other measurements wrong?

A Japanese astronaut has apologised for wrongly stating he has grown 9cm (3.5in) since arriving at the International Space Station (ISS) just over three weeks ago.

Norishige Kanai said in fact he grew by 2cm, blaming "a measurement mistake".

"I'm very sorry for tweeting out such fake news," he tweeted in Japanese.

His original incorrect claim sparked global fascination among social media users. Astronauts grow an average of between 2-5cm in space.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-42630473
 

Mythopoeika

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I wonder if he gets his other measurements wrong?

A Japanese astronaut has apologised for wrongly stating he has grown 9cm (3.5in) since arriving at the International Space Station (ISS) just over three weeks ago.

Norishige Kanai said in fact he grew by 2cm, blaming "a measurement mistake".

"I'm very sorry for tweeting out such fake news," he tweeted in Japanese.

His original incorrect claim sparked global fascination among social media users. Astronauts grow an average of between 2-5cm in space.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-42630473
He's a medical doctor. Wouldn't trust him to get the dose right for an injection.
 

Ermintruder

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I was in no doubt whatsoever that the original report was utter rubbish. He would've been paralysed, via that degree of spinal stretching

Here's the thing: for years (certainly, in my case for over 20yrs) I've been doubtful about a substantial proportion of the mainstream 'news' we're fed.

The outing in recent months & days of a "false news phenomenon" is nothing short of breathtaking. We can now have news that is officially false, and... news that is officially real.

Well- that's all just fine, then. Certainly puts my mind at rest. :pop:

Quite aside from resized astronauts...

No matter how trusting you are of official narratives, irrespective of how dismissive you may be of various conspiracies, surely people can see that the information-rich world we live in has no baselines, no absolute truths, no fundamental reported realities.

The first thing any good conjuror does is establish trust with his audience. And maybe do a little feint, to make us believe we've got the better of him. Then we just accept everything we see and hear...because it's no longer false.
 

ramonmercado

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No matter how trusting you are of official narratives, irrespective of how dismissive you may be of various conspiracies, surely people can see that the information-rich world we live in has no baselines, no absolute truths, no fundamental reported realities.
You just made that up.
 

ramonmercado

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Bad news. No ISS might mean no Mars Mission.

The International Space Station (ISS) is barrelling towards its expiry date, and NASA isn’t ready. Federal funding of the ISS might be cut off at the end of 2024, but without it NASA won’t be able to study the health risks of spaceflight or test technology that will enable deep-space exploration.

A report from NASA’s Office of the Inspector General predicts that many of NASA’s research goals will not be complete by 2025. Of 20 main human health risks under investigation, studies on at least 6 won’t be done by then. Of 40 technology gaps being addressed, at least 4 won’t be solved. Any delay or slip in scheduling could also thwart the 19 projects scheduled for completion during 2024.

The studies that will not be finished in time include research into how vision and motor functions degrade in zero gravity, risks of cognitive and behavioural problems, long-term life support in space, and space suits for longer missions, like a flight to Mars.

https://www.newscientist.com/articl...he-iss-could-put-its-mars-missions-in-danger/
 

Mythopoeika

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GNC

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The strong likelihood is that someone building the capsule made a mistake and tried to cover it up.
If they tried to cover it up, wouldn't sealing it be a pretty good idea?
 

Mythopoeika

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If they tried to cover it up, wouldn't sealing it be a pretty good idea?
I had heard that there was sealant in there, but it must have fallen away during the launch.
They're doing a spacewalk to look at it from outside.
 

ramonmercado

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Cookies In Space!

Chocolate chip cookies have become the first food to be baked in space in a first-of-its-kind experiment.

Astronauts baked the cookies in a special zero-gravity oven at the International Space Station (ISS) last month. Sealed in individual baking pouches, three of the cookies returned to Earth on the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft on 7 January. The aim of the experiment was to study cooking options for long-haul trips. The results of the experiment, carried out by astronauts Luca Parmitano and Christina Koch, were revealed this week.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-51235555
 

Xanatic*

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It was just a marketing stunt. Sad to see the ISS is involved.
 

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Long Distance Doctoring.

Of all the unfortunate places to be when you discover you have a blood clot, the worst has got to be 250 miles up in the sky, zooming around the world at 17,000 miles per hour aboard the International Space Station.

But in a study published last month in The New England Journal of Medicine, doctors detailed how they treated one such unlucky case. The astronaut was participating in a study on vascular flow in space and did a routine ultrasound scan on their neck. From the ground, doctors who saw the images noticed that there didn’t appear to be any blood flow in the astronaut’s left jugular vein. (The patient remains anonymous for privacy reasons.)

A followup ultrasound confirmed the problem: a venous thrombosis, or blood clot. It was the first one ever diagnosed in space. And it was quite the surprise, because the patient was showing no symptoms and had already been screened by NASA for predisposition to blood clots—and passed. Jugular clots have been associated with conditions like cancer, but an unprovoked clot in an otherwise healthy person is uncommon.

https://www.wired.com/story/blood-clot-space-station/
 

ramonmercado

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They should have grown rocket leaves.

Nasa astronauts have reported that lettuce grown entirely in space is as nutritious and safe to eat as lettuce grown on Earth.

A report published in the journal Frontiers In Plant Science revealed that the space-grown lettuce was similar in composition to Earth-grown control samples, while some plants were even richer in a number of elements, including potassium, sodium and zinc.

The experiment involved crops being grown in individual sealed units of ceramic soil under red LED lighting for 33 to 56 days.

Astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS) intermittently watered the crops by injecting them through a tube.

https://www.irishexaminer.com/break...afe-and-nutritious-say-astronauts-986127.html
 

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Extremely detailed and lengthy up to date tour of the ISS ..

 
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I was reading that at the cost approx $1 million a day to provide the ISS with water they are now recycling human excretions for their water consumption, however with each astronaught requiring approx 12 litres of water per day they are still sending water into space at approx $10,000 per litre, my main issue is that, even though our planet is two thirds water it is still a finite resource, the vast majority of the water we use every day remains on the planet, where as the water lost in space is irreplacable, so the more we explore space and the more people that go into space, the more our finite supply of water on this planet is reduced.
 

Naughty_Felid

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I was reading that at the cost approx $1 million a day to provide the ISS with water they are now recycling human excretions for their water consumption, however with each astronaught requiring approx 12 litres of water per day they are still sending water into space at approx $10,000 per litre, my main issue is that, even though our planet is two thirds water it is still a finite resource, the vast majority of the water we use every day remains on the planet, where as the water lost in space is irreplacable, so the more we explore space and the more people that go into space, the more our finite supply of water on this planet is reduced.
Well that's silly, why don't they just lasso a passing comet?
 

Mythopoeika

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I was reading that at the cost approx $1 million a day to provide the ISS with water they are now recycling human excretions for their water consumption, however with each astronaught requiring approx 12 litres of water per day they are still sending water into space at approx $10,000 per litre, my main issue is that, even though our planet is two thirds water it is still a finite resource, the vast majority of the water we use every day remains on the planet, where as the water lost in space is irreplacable, so the more we explore space and the more people that go into space, the more our finite supply of water on this planet is reduced.
AFAIK, a certain amount of water vapour boils off into space anyway.
 

Souleater

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AFAIK, a certain amount of water vapour boils off into space anyway.
I did say the vast majority :p but with each of the 3 astronaughts using 12 gallons of water a day, that is 13,140 gallons per year sent into space, thats a lot of water.
 

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Put ‘em on a water meter that will concentrate the minds somewhat
 

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12 gallons per astronaut sounds like a lot. Besides, isn't the point that most of those 12 gallons will be used several times? It's not 12 gallons of fresh water every day.
 

kamalktk

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I did say the vast majority :p but with each of the 3 astronaughts using 12 gallons of water a day, that is 13,140 gallons per year sent into space, thats a lot of water.
It says liters in your original? Those are significantly different.
 
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