Ageing & Growing Old

Are you growing older?

  • Yes, I am

    Votes: 70 61.9%
  • No, I'm getting younger

    Votes: 22 19.5%
  • Sorry, I don't understand the question

    Votes: 14 12.4%
  • I'm a Mod; I think adding silly polls to chat threads is pointless

    Votes: 7 6.2%

  • Total voters
    113

ramonmercado

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Barnstorming Betty! Vid at link.

Wingwalker Betty Bromage completes fifth high-flying challenge

It might strike fear into most people but 93-year-old Betty Bromage has no trouble taking to the skies strapped to the wing of a plane.

The Gloucestershire pensioner has just finished her fifth daredevil challenge to raise money for a local hospice.

"I can't do a lot of things but this is something I can do towards charity, and it's helping other people. That's basically been my way of life, to try and help people."

Video Journalist: Dan Ayers

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-england-gloucestershire-62439376
 

ramonmercado

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The habit of growing old has been around for a long time.

Every year I ask the college students in the course I teach about the 14th-century Black Death to imagine they are farmers or nuns or nobles in the Middle Ages. What would their lives have been like in the face of this terrifying disease that killed millions of people in just a few years?

Setting aside how they envision what it would be like to confront the plague, these undergrads often figure that during the medieval period they would already be considered middle-aged or elderly at the age of 20. Rather than being in the prime of life, they think they'd soon be decrepit and dead.

They're reflecting a common misperception that long life spans in humans are very recent, and that no one in the past lived much beyond their 30s.

But that's just not true. I am a bioarchaeologist, which means that I study human skeletons excavated from archaeological sites to understand what life was like in the past. I'm especially interested in demography—mortality (deaths), fertility (births) and migration—and how it was linked with health conditions and diseases such as the Black Death hundreds or thousands of years ago. There's physical evidence that plenty of people in the past lived long lives—just as long as some people do today.

One of the first steps in research about demography in the past is to estimate how old people were when they died. Bioarchaeologists do this using information about how your bones and teeth change as you get older.

For example, I look for changes to joints in the pelvis that are common at older ages. Observations of these joints in people today whose ages we know allow us to estimate ages for people from archaeological sites with joints that look similar.

Another way to estimate age is to use a microscope to count the yearly additions of a mineralized tissue called cementum on teeth. It's similar to counting a tree's rings to see how many years it lived. Using approaches like these, many studies have documented the existence of people who lived long lives in the past.


For example, by examining skeletal remains, anthropologist Meggan Bullock and colleagues found that in the city of Cholula, Mexico, between 900 and 1531, most people who made it to adulthood lived past the age of 50.

And of course there are many examples from historical records of people who lived very long lives in the past. For example, the sixth-century Roman Emperor Justinian I reportedly died at the age of 83.

Analysis of the tooth development of an ancient anatomically modern Homo sapiens individual from Morocco suggests that our species has experienced long life spans for at least the past 160,000 years. ...

https://phys.org/news/2022-08-age-isnt-modern-phenomenon-people.html
 

Tunn11

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Nov 23, 2005
Messages
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Under the highest tree top in Kent
The habit of growing old has been around for a long time.

Every year I ask the college students in the course I teach about the 14th-century Black Death to imagine they are farmers or nuns or nobles in the Middle Ages. What would their lives have been like in the face of this terrifying disease that killed millions of people in just a few years?

Setting aside how they envision what it would be like to confront the plague, these undergrads often figure that during the medieval period they would already be considered middle-aged or elderly at the age of 20. Rather than being in the prime of life, they think they'd soon be decrepit and dead.

They're reflecting a common misperception that long life spans in humans are very recent, and that no one in the past lived much beyond their 30s.

But that's just not true. I am a bioarchaeologist, which means that I study human skeletons excavated from archaeological sites to understand what life was like in the past. I'm especially interested in demography—mortality (deaths), fertility (births) and migration—and how it was linked with health conditions and diseases such as the Black Death hundreds or thousands of years ago. There's physical evidence that plenty of people in the past lived long lives—just as long as some people do today.

One of the first steps in research about demography in the past is to estimate how old people were when they died. Bioarchaeologists do this using information about how your bones and teeth change as you get older.

For example, I look for changes to joints in the pelvis that are common at older ages. Observations of these joints in people today whose ages we know allow us to estimate ages for people from archaeological sites with joints that look similar.

Another way to estimate age is to use a microscope to count the yearly additions of a mineralized tissue called cementum on teeth. It's similar to counting a tree's rings to see how many years it lived. Using approaches like these, many studies have documented the existence of people who lived long lives in the past.


For example, by examining skeletal remains, anthropologist Meggan Bullock and colleagues found that in the city of Cholula, Mexico, between 900 and 1531, most people who made it to adulthood lived past the age of 50.

And of course there are many examples from historical records of people who lived very long lives in the past. For example, the sixth-century Roman Emperor Justinian I reportedly died at the age of 83.

Analysis of the tooth development of an ancient anatomically modern Homo sapiens individual from Morocco suggests that our species has experienced long life spans for at least the past 160,000 years. ...

https://phys.org/news/2022-08-age-isnt-modern-phenomenon-people.html
I think a lot of people are fooled by "average life expectancy" which if I'm correct incorporates infant mortality? Therefore if a lot of children die of childhood diseases it lowers the average life expectancy. Once past childhood a lot of people lived a fairly long life.
 

Floyd1

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I suppose that also, many early deaths were caused by accidents (that today would hardly merit a trip to hospital), and were therefore not due to illnesses or disease as we are often lead to believe was the case.

Even today, while nowhere near as high as they once were even just a few decades ago, construction and farming (which were probably the two main forms of employment throughout the ages) are still very high risk occupations.
 

Ghost In The Machine

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Yorkshire
The habit of growing old has been around for a long time.

Every year I ask the college students in the course I teach about the 14th-century Black Death to imagine they are farmers or nuns or nobles in the Middle Ages. What would their lives have been like in the face of this terrifying disease that killed millions of people in just a few years?

Setting aside how they envision what it would be like to confront the plague, these undergrads often figure that during the medieval period they would already be considered middle-aged or elderly at the age of 20. Rather than being in the prime of life, they think they'd soon be decrepit and dead.

They're reflecting a common misperception that long life spans in humans are very recent, and that no one in the past lived much beyond their 30s.

But that's just not true. I am a bioarchaeologist, which means that I study human skeletons excavated from archaeological sites to understand what life was like in the past. I'm especially interested in demography—mortality (deaths), fertility (births) and migration—and how it was linked with health conditions and diseases such as the Black Death hundreds or thousands of years ago. There's physical evidence that plenty of people in the past lived long lives—just as long as some people do today.

One of the first steps in research about demography in the past is to estimate how old people were when they died. Bioarchaeologists do this using information about how your bones and teeth change as you get older.

For example, I look for changes to joints in the pelvis that are common at older ages. Observations of these joints in people today whose ages we know allow us to estimate ages for people from archaeological sites with joints that look similar.

Another way to estimate age is to use a microscope to count the yearly additions of a mineralized tissue called cementum on teeth. It's similar to counting a tree's rings to see how many years it lived. Using approaches like these, many studies have documented the existence of people who lived long lives in the past.


For example, by examining skeletal remains, anthropologist Meggan Bullock and colleagues found that in the city of Cholula, Mexico, between 900 and 1531, most people who made it to adulthood lived past the age of 50.

And of course there are many examples from historical records of people who lived very long lives in the past. For example, the sixth-century Roman Emperor Justinian I reportedly died at the age of 83.

Analysis of the tooth development of an ancient anatomically modern Homo sapiens individual from Morocco suggests that our species has experienced long life spans for at least the past 160,000 years. ...

https://phys.org/news/2022-08-age-isnt-modern-phenomenon-people.html
I spotted this doing genealogy, as well.

My mum died aged 47. As did her mum. So you'd assume her direct line ancestors, farmers in all the villages round here right back to first page of many parish records here, were also shortlived. Because all her ancestors were concentrated in one part of Yorkshire, with the occasional foray maybe in another bit of Yorkshire, they were easy to trace in parish records (where burials sometimes give you cause of death, pre 1837 and certification).

But get back even just into the 19thC and there will be entire families born of 10 or more kids, in these farming families where every single one lives into their 80s... Every single person. And no infant deaths at all. Or one or two per generation. And seen this repeated across various branches of the family. In other words, my 20thC ancestors had lives almost only half as long as many of their ancestors.

You hear a lot about infant mortality but it's only really striking in parish records when there's say, an epidemic like smallpox, or whooping cough. Or in poorer families, sadly - the one line in my mum's immediate past who were labourers not farmers, had most of their kids die before age 2 or 3. But that was so unusual in the genealogy as to stand out.

Swathes of the population were less or unaffected by it. (I'm thinking rural parishes here - cities would be very different but of course pre Industrial Rev most people's ancestors are on the land).

Was at Vindolanda this week where they have an obscene number of Roman shoes - mainly discarded singletons. And it struck me how most looked like a modern size 5 or 6. Some, bigger. I always avoid that cliché when doing Living History about people being shorter in the past, as well. A lot might depend on nutrition and that wasn't always as bad as we'd imagine, for people in say the 18thC or 19thC.

Your life expectancy in a 19thC industrial city might be very short indeed. At the same date, your life expectancy in the countryside might be into your 80s.

A few years back I researched an 1830s' accident which had 3 survivors - all middle aged men, all working class - farm labourers. All three of the survivors lived well into their 80s.
 
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Iris

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Messages
2,493
Growing old is hard work …………. The mind says “yes” but the body says “What the hell are you thinking”? I feel that I should clean the house so I am heading out to the garden until that feeling passes
 

Dick Turpin

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Mar 28, 2018
Messages
754
I’m 52 early next year, but I must admit I don’t feel it. II am going grey around the edges though – and all I need to do is grow a moustache, and I’ll look like spider man’s boss lol.

There is a lady who I chat to regularly who works in the shop near to my son’s school -a nice and pleasant person, chatty and polite etc. Anyway, few weeks back Mrs DT and I went for a walk, and this lady drove past us in her car, beeped me and waved, so I waved back.

Who’s that Mrs DT asked..? Oh, I said that’s’ Laura, she works in that little shop near to the school. Chatting up other now wimmin now are yer, she said. Leave it out love, she must in her forties I replied.

She stopped walking, looked me straight into the eyes and said yes Dick, but your 51.!!!!.
 

brownmane

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Ontario, Canada
You should (really shouldn't) try being a physically very capable person who gets early onset parkinsons. I feel I've aged twenty years in the last three.
Sorry to hear that. My dad had Parkinson's, but diagnosed in later years. Regular exercises that involve balance are one thing to help you keep moving.

I can't find the video, but about 5 years ago, I saw a video about a woman who had set up a gym specifically for people with Parkinson's. She was, iirc, a physiotherapist.

She said the best thing is boxing because of the variety of skills used to help to maintain balance and repetitive patterns in movement. I'm making a mash of trying to explain it since it was several years ago that I saw it.

The exercise areas consisted of a walking area where the participants followed a line (balance). A punching ball (don't know what it is really called) to exercise arms and to help with maintaining coordination. And other stations that involved activities that boxing involves.
 
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PeteByrdie

Privateer in the service of Princess Frideswide
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Sorry to hear that. My dad had Parkinson's, but diagnosed in later years. Regular exercises that involve balance are one thing to help you keep moving.

I can't find the video, but about 5 years ago, I saw a video about a woman who had set up a gym specifically for people with Parkinson's. She was, iirc, a physiotherapist.

She said the best thing is boxing because of the variety of skills used to help to maintain balance and repetitive patterns in movement. I'm making a mash of trying to explain it since it was several years ago that I saw it.

The exercise areas consisted of a walking area where the participants followed a line (balance). A punching ball (don't know what it is really called) to exercise arms and to help with maintaining coordination. And other stations that involved activities that boxing involves.
I've started working out again, but I'm not doing nearly enough exercise, especially walking, because it's got so hard. Not to mention risky. I believe exercise helps because my first symptoms were in 2015, and only got gradually worse while I continued doing a very physical job for five years. Within a few weeks of going into lockdown in March 2020 all my symptoms were worse, with a few more. It took a month to get a doctor appointment and wasn't until October 2020 I got a diagnosis. But, by then, the Internet had basically confirmed what I had.
 

ramonmercado

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Yer never too old to learn!

A 92-year-old man believed to be the oldest person in the UK to sit a GCSE exam has passed his maths paper with a grade five - the highest mark possible for the foundation course he studied.

Derek Skipper, from Orwell in Cambridgeshire, sat the exam after studying via Zoom.
He last sat a maths exam in 1946 when he used a slide rule, but this time he had a calculator and a magnifying glass to help with his poor eyesight.
He said he was delighted with his pass.
Speaking after June's exam, Mr Skipper said: "If I get a five I'll be very chuffed, but if it's a four, I'd accept that. My family thought I was nuts for trying it but [were] also very supportive and helped me out."

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-62671962
 

maximus otter

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Yer never too old to learn!

A 92-year-old man believed to be the oldest person in the UK to sit a GCSE exam has passed his maths paper with a grade five - the highest mark possible for the foundation course he studied.

Derek Skipper, from Orwell in Cambridgeshire, sat the exam after studying via Zoom.
He last sat a maths exam in 1946 when he used a slide rule, but this time he had a calculator and a magnifying glass to help with his poor eyesight.
He said he was delighted with his pass.
Speaking after June's exam, Mr Skipper said: "If I get a five I'll be very chuffed, but if it's a four, I'd accept that. My family thought I was nuts for trying it but [were] also very supportive and helped me out."

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-62671962

“I’m delighted that my tenure as Chancellor of the Exchequer is finally secure.”

maximus otter
 

Tunn11

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I've started working out again, but I'm not doing nearly enough exercise, especially walking, because it's got so hard. Not to mention risky. I believe exercise helps because my first symptoms were in 2015, and only got gradually worse while I continued doing a very physical job for five years. Within a few weeks of going into lockdown in March 2020 all my symptoms were worse, with a few more. It took a month to get a doctor appointment and wasn't until October 2020 I got a diagnosis. But, by then, the Internet had basically confirmed what I had.
I think you're right. A friend of mine, a builder has been diagnosed with Parkinsons; lockdown and the need for two hip replacements slowed him down considerably and that's when the Parkinsons got to be more of an issue. A hip replacement (one so far) and some treatment has got him more mobile which seems to be helping.
Hope things improve for you.
 

Floyd1

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I've started working out again, but I'm not doing nearly enough exercise, especially walking, because it's got so hard. Not to mention risky. I believe exercise helps because my first symptoms were in 2015, and only got gradually worse while I continued doing a very physical job for five years. Within a few weeks of going into lockdown in March 2020 all my symptoms were worse, with a few more. It took a month to get a doctor appointment and wasn't until October 2020 I got a diagnosis. But, by then, the Internet had basically confirmed what I had.
'They' always say that swimming is the best exercise Pete.

Personally I don't like swimming pools as an adult though - not that we've got one here anymore anyway.
 

charliebrown

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The dentist says I have a spot in my gums that looks like the gum is starting to pull back a little.

This is a new item for me, and I don’t think there is a cure.

I guess I am lucky to still have my teeth.

My sister had bad gum disease and over time lost her teeth and wears false teeth.
 

Sollywos

Studying for finals of Grumpy Old Lady degree.
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At one time, if someone had said that they had Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME), I would have thought 'you mean you're lazy?' Now I think I have it. No energy whatsoever- again.
That'll larn ya boy for being so damn judgemental!

Not to wish to sound unsympathetic as I know ony too well what you are going through. I was diagnosed with 'post viral fatigue' which is a similar sort of thing, once as a young mother which wasn't easy but things did get better eventually, and again when I was getting towards my retirement. I had to have a lot of time off work and then when I was feeling able they let me go part time. This set of affairs didn't do my pension pot much good.

The thing is not only was I feeling awful but I knew damn well that a lot of people thought as you did so although I'm not a nasty person and I do like you (well your on-line persona which may or may not bear any relation to your real self :) ) there is a little bit of me thinking 'bloody good enough for him'. The rest of me is sympathetic however. xx
 

charliebrown

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Over the years from what I have read in the U.S. I don’t think American doctors take Chronic Fatigue Syndrome seriously because the symptoms are at times vague.

One article suggested seeing a sleep specialist who could have a better understanding of this condition.
 

Floyd1

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That'll larn ya boy for being so damn judgemental!

Not to wish to sound unsympathetic as I know ony too well what you are going through. I was diagnosed with 'post viral fatigue' which is a similar sort of thing, once as a young mother which wasn't easy but things did get better eventually, and again when I was getting towards my retirement. I had to have a lot of time off work and then when I was feeling able they let me go part time. This set of affairs didn't do my pension pot much good.

The thing is not only was I feeling awful but I knew damn well that a lot of people thought as you did so although I'm not a nasty person and I do like you (well your on-line persona which may or may not bear any relation to your real self :) ) there is a little bit of me thinking 'bloody good enough for him'. The rest of me is sympathetic however. xx
Fair one- I deserved that.
Anyway, I would have never thought that of you, it's the other lazy gits people that I was referring to.

As for on-line persona- no, my real self is an unintelligible, drunken, rambling, inarticulate arse. So nothing like the me on here...
Hang on a minute.....?
 

Floyd1

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I feel sure we've met ;)
And now I've got Auntie Solly about to whack me with one of those Scholl clogs (like my mother used to do in the 1970's).
Man, the 70s were really brutal.
 

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Sollywos

Studying for finals of Grumpy Old Lady degree.
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And now I've got Auntie Solly about to whack me with one of those Scholl clogs (like my mother used to do in the 1970's).
Man, the 70s were really brutal.
Ah hah I did have some like that in the early seventies but the ones I had when my boys were little were red. However I didn't whack my children with them on account of my 'no smacking' policy, which isn't to say I wasn't tempted!

Brutal, the seventies? Hah that was nothing my mum used to whack me with a Mason Pearson hairbrush. Not sure what was worse the wooden side or the bristle side. She was a hairdresser and was very proud of this brush but going by the prices today I'm not sure how she ever afforded one!

https://www.googleadservices.com/pa...eiwyef5AhW1SkEAHUuHAy8Q9aACKAB6BAgDEFQ&adurl=
1661622659522.png
 

brownmane

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As I was picking something up from the floor this morning I saw something else down there and wondered if it was just me who would multitask while they were down there.
Good for you:curt:. I usually pick up or clean something under the table only to stand back up and see something I missed.

There's a reason we get smarter and more efficient as we age. It's called ageing and we can only get up and down so many times. Use energy efficiently :)
 
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