• We have updated the guidelines regarding posting political content: please see the stickied thread on Website Issues.

Conspiracy In Ireland: North & South

Not forgetting that while the IRA had its roots in a political struggle, many parts of it were criminal gangs operating under the 'flag' of the IRA. This is why any peace process was hard-won - for many members, it was personally highly lucrative.

That was more true of the various splinters of the INLA.
 
No charges.

investigation began in 2016 under Jon Boutcher, who is now chief constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland. Hmmm.

Sixteen people - including former IRA members and security force personnel - investigated as part of Operation Kenova, will not face any charges, it has been decided.

Operation Kenova was a £37m inquiry into the Army agent within the IRA known as Stakeknife. He is widely believed to have been west Belfast man Freddie Scappaticci.

The Public Prosecution Service (PPS) decisions include three murders between 1981 and 1993. It said there is "insufficient evidence" to bring charges. A significant part of the evidence is intelligence records which are "not possible to use" to bring prosecutions.

Mr Scappaticci died earlier this year

The victims' families were told of the decisions hours before they were made public on Wednesday.

The Operation Kenova investigation began in 2016 under Jon Boutcher, who is now chief constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI).

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-67635887
 
no charges for these four either.

Two retired soldiers who handled the Army agent within the IRA known as Stakeknife are not to be prosecuted in connection with a number of kidnappings and murders.

The Public Prosecution Service (PPS) said the evidence was insufficient. IIt also decided two people, who were IRA members at the time of the incidents in the early 1980s, would likewise not face any charges.

Stakeknife is believed to have been Freddie Scappaticci, who died in 2023. The agent's actions have been the subject of a six-year investigation known as Operation Kenova. It began in 2016 under Jon Boutcher, who is now chief constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland. It examined Stakeknife's activities within the IRA's internal security unit, which was responsible for killing alleged informers, and the role of the Army.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-68218740
 
This case involves the Military Reaction Force

An Army veteran is to be charged with the murder of a man and the attempted murder of six others in Belfast during the Troubles more than 50 years ago.

Three other former soldiers will also face prosecution for attempted murder. he move was announced by the Public Prosecution Service (PPS) after examining evidence submitted following a police investigation.Due to the timing of the decisions, the cases are not affected by the Legacy Act. From later in 2024, the Legacy Act will offer amnesties in Troubles cases.

A veteran referred to as Soldier F will face a charge of murdering Patrick McVeigh, 44, at Finaghy Road North in May 1972. He will also be prosecuted for the attempted murder of four other people in the same incident. Along with individuals referred to Soldiers B, C, and D he is also to be charged with the attempted murder of two people in a separate shooting at Slievegallon Drive in west Belfast, also in May 1972.

The individuals referred to as Soldier F and Soldier C are not the same individuals involved in any previous or on-going prosecution relating to events in Northern Ireland in 1972.

All the shootings involved a undercover Army unit called the Military Reaction Force (MRF), which operated in Belfast in the early 1970s. It was a small, secretive unit and consisted of about 40 soldiers who patrolled west Belfast in unmarked cars. It operated for about 18 months before it was disbanded in 1973.

In 2013, former members of the unit told a BBC Panorama programme that the unit had been involved in the killing of unarmed civilians.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-68238984
 
This case involves the Military Reaction Force

An Army veteran is to be charged with the murder of a man and the attempted murder of six others in Belfast during the Troubles more than 50 years ago.

Three other former soldiers will also face prosecution for attempted murder. he move was announced by the Public Prosecution Service (PPS) after examining evidence submitted following a police investigation.Due to the timing of the decisions, the cases are not affected by the Legacy Act. From later in 2024, the Legacy Act will offer amnesties in Troubles cases.

A veteran referred to as Soldier F will face a charge of murdering Patrick McVeigh, 44, at Finaghy Road North in May 1972. He will also be prosecuted for the attempted murder of four other people in the same incident. Along with individuals referred to Soldiers B, C, and D he is also to be charged with the attempted murder of two people in a separate shooting at Slievegallon Drive in west Belfast, also in May 1972.

The individuals referred to as Soldier F and Soldier C are not the same individuals involved in any previous or on-going prosecution relating to events in Northern Ireland in 1972.

All the shootings involved a undercover Army unit called the Military Reaction Force (MRF), which operated in Belfast in the early 1970s. It was a small, secretive unit and consisted of about 40 soldiers who patrolled west Belfast in unmarked cars. It operated for about 18 months before it was disbanded in 1973.

In 2013, former members of the unit told a BBC Panorama programme that the unit had been involved in the killing of unarmed civilians.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-68238984

Yet 483 terrorists, between them responsible for hundreds or thousands of murders, walked free from prison because of the Good Friday Agreement:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-65164519

Many of them served only two years’ imprisonment despite being convicted of, for example, the murder of police officers.

maximus otter
 
Yet 483 terrorists, between them responsible for hundreds or thousands of murders, walked free from prison because of the Good Friday Agreement:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-65164519

Many of them served only two years’ imprisonment despite being convicted of, for example, the murder of police officers.

maximus otter

If these ex-soldiers are convicted they 'll also serve a maximum of two years.

These were state agents, they are accused of shooting civilians.
 
Its all tragic lads, we should have been fishing, watching the racing and listening to music together. It was a terrible time now consigned to the past. Hate and bitterness just brings more of the same. As Commandant Tom Barry, ex-British soldier and IRA commander said in 1920 "war is sheer bloody murder".
 
Back
Top