Good Eggs 'N Bad Eggs

cycleboy2

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Dec 22, 2005
Messages
2,553
Reaction score
6,830
Points
239
My favourite is poached eggs on crumpets. The crumpet is designed so that butter melts and runs into the holes but with my incredible unique recipe, the egg yolk also soaks in and is delicious. That’s my recipe. No stealing it.
Crumpets with butter, and poached eggs, are both glories of the universe - not sure I fancy combining them but you never know...
 

Kondoru

Antediluvian
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Messages
8,944
Reaction score
4,742
Points
264
Wonderful.

I prefer Duck eggs but then I do.

Chickens eggs are best fried. Ducks come out hard.

Goose eggs are like ducks but seasonable and far more expensive.

Turkey eggs are a bit musky.

Ostrich or Rheas eggs far too big!
 

escargot

Disciple of Marduk
Joined
Aug 24, 2001
Messages
37,934
Reaction score
57,050
Points
334
Location
HM The Tower of London
edit: my other point is that a lot of people enjoy runny-yolks. Does anyone here know of anyone who has ever had salmonella poisoning (or whatever it does) as I've never met anyone to my knowledge who has suffered. Is it more than a notional risk?
Salmonella is truly horrible. I've heard people say it's the most ill they've ever felt and they'd wanted to die.

As has been mentioned, the danger is mainly from contamination of the shells. I've never washed eggs before cooking them but I bet anyone who's had salmonella does. If they'll even have eggs in the house, that is.

Because duck eggs have larger pores than hen eggs they used to be notorious for passing on salmonella. Old household management books warn sternly against buying or eating them.
 

Floyd1

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
2,338
Reaction score
5,429
Points
209
Being an unreformed and atavistic discriminatory monster, I allow Mrs Yith to deal with the bulk of the non-toast based cooking, but if there's an egg to be fried I manfully step up as though it were barbecue season. Spectators may scoff as the eggs scarcely stay in one place for more than five seconds and I'm constantly flicking traces of oil onto the whites, but the result is utterly uniform: no transparent film, very slight crunch at the edge and a yolk that is bottom third thick and top two-thirds gooey liquid.

*Assumes exaggerated French accent*

"You saleevate, but you can't reesist!"
I had you down as a 'Steak Tartare' kind of chap.
 

Floyd1

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
2,338
Reaction score
5,429
Points
209
I pretty much do the same as rynner2 said on post 26, except I do time them (10 minutes) for hard boiled, but not too hard boiled. I also usually do 5-6 at a time and they're fine in the fridge for 3-4 days.
 

Yithian

Parish Watch
Staff member
Joined
Oct 29, 2002
Messages
34,214
Reaction score
46,550
Points
314
Location
East of Suez
I had you down as a 'Steak Tartare' kind of chap.

Always a stickler for tradition, I don't own a horse with which to tenderise it.

I also haven't eaten any non water-dwelling creature for... twenty years now.

Amazingly, now I do the maths.

And I went out with a Zinger Tower Burger on New Year's Eve. Could have been worse, but probably could have been quite a bit better, too. The problem is that I only expected to last a few weeks, not two decades.
 

Bad Bungle

Tutti but not Frutti.
Joined
Oct 13, 2018
Messages
3,368
Reaction score
9,916
Points
209
Location
The Chilterns
Because duck eggs have larger pores than hen eggs they used to be notorious for passing on salmonella. Old household management books warn sternly against buying or eating them.
The wise old women of the Village told me to NEVER bake with duck eggs (as opposed to hen eggs) - although they were less clear as to the reason. Something about the richer yolk making sponges more soggy maybe. All the baking pundits on the Net now say that all the cholesterol in the egg white make duck eggs the preferred choice for meringues and fluffy sponges. Of course now I no longer have a fresh source of said eggs.
 

Frideswide

Fortea Morgana :) PeteByrdie certificated Princess
Joined
Jul 14, 2014
Messages
14,750
Reaction score
18,823
Points
289
Location
An Eochair
Ditto Kinder eggs.

I was at a Serious Conference and having done my session treated myself to a Kinder Egg.

The toy was a surprisingly decent magnifing glass which had to be assembled. Ut ended up as a rather pleasing green turtle with the lens being protected within the shell.

I was working away at the construction and realised that people were looking at me. So much for serious professional image!

But next coffee break there were a handful of people with them, and more the next day. Some of us still have the toys!
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
47,664
Reaction score
43,987
Points
334
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
I was at a Serious Conference and having done my session treated myself to a Kinder Egg.

The toy was a surprisingly decent magnifing glass which had to be assembled. Ut ended up as a rather pleasing green turtle with the lens being protected within the shell.

I was working away at the construction and realised that people were looking at me. So much for serious professional image!

But next coffee break there were a handful of people with them, and more the next day. Some of us still have the toys!
In my first job in software, pretty much the whole office had a collection on their desks. I gave mine away when I left.
After I'd left, I heard that the big boss walked around and put a ban on the use of desk space for the toys.
 

CarlosTheDJ

Antediluvian
Joined
Feb 1, 2007
Messages
7,076
Reaction score
9,793
Points
299
Location
Pebble Mill
Just found out that Kinder Surprise eggs were banned in the States until fairly recently as the toy is not a foodstuff.

The article said that a new version was going to be launched a couple of years ago, where the plastic egg is sealed - which circumvents the law.

I don't know if it happened or not?

Also from the same piece, I learnt that haggis is banned in the USA as it's illegal to eat lungs.
 

Eyespy

Ephemeral Spectre
Joined
Oct 6, 2010
Messages
257
Reaction score
1,016
Points
154
Carlos, we hit the Haggis ban problem when we lived there, trying to organize a Burns night supper. managed to get a Piper and a genuine Scot to read the Burns poem, the serving of the "illegal " haggis caused some real problems.
 

ChasFink

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
Messages
1,656
Reaction score
4,464
Points
164
I may have mentioned this in another thread, but eggs in the US are kept refrigerated because they are washed before shipping. The American egg industry apparently feels this is more economical than keeping the production lines cleaner. I think this is the source of more fear surrounding undercooked eggs. Various communities, including the entire state of New Jersey IIRC, have at times banned restaurants from serving runny yolks, but this is usually reversed in a short amount of time after public outcry.

Kinder Surprise is not available because the toy and capsule are completely surrounded by chocolate, and therefore are inedible "ingredients". Kinder Joy, which has half an egg of chocolate and half an egg of toy capsule, is widely available.

The ban on lung meat goes back to 1971, but I could swear I saw at least pot haggis on menus years after that. Can you make a decent haggis without lungs?
The ban does not extend to pet food, so some enterprising company might find a way to sneak it in with the right labeling.
 

Bad Bungle

Tutti but not Frutti.
Joined
Oct 13, 2018
Messages
3,368
Reaction score
9,916
Points
209
Location
The Chilterns
Kinder Surprise is not available because the toy and capsule are completely surrounded by chocolate, and therefore are inedible "ingredients".
It's those bloody three year olds cramming everything around them into their mouths and their parents expecting the world to change to accommodate their choking little shits darlings. I want small plastic toys re-inserted in my box of cereal and the removal of child-proof caps and blister packs on medicine for rheumatoid athritis. I want childhood to be full of surprise and danger. And that includes warm eggs and BSE riddled haggis. Merry Xmas.
 

ChasFink

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
Messages
1,656
Reaction score
4,464
Points
164
It's those bloody three year olds cramming everything around them into their mouths and their parents expecting the world to change to accommodate their choking little shits darlings. I want small plastic toys re-inserted in my box of cereal and the removal of child-proof caps and blister packs on medicine for rheumatoid athritis. I want childhood to be full of surprise and danger. And that includes warm eggs and BSE riddled haggis. Merry Xmas.
I'm told the ban on Kinder Surprise has nothing to do with the choking hazard - which could be handled by the same warning that's on Kinder Joy - but is based in food purity law. The plastic, being contained by the chocolate, is considered in the same way it would be if it were ground up and added as filler. I don't know how true that is; God knows there are plenty of things in American food that's less healthy than plastic. Or sheep lungs.
 

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
32,702
Reaction score
54,282
Points
289
Being an unreformed and atavistic discriminatory monster, I allow Mrs Yith to deal with the bulk of the non-toast based cooking, but if there's an egg to be fried I manfully step up as though it were barbecue season. Spectators may scoff as the eggs scarcely stay in one place for more than five seconds and I'm constantly flicking traces of oil onto the whites, but the result is utterly uniform: no transparent film, very slight crunch at the edge and a yolk that is bottom third thick and top two-thirds gooey liquid.

*Assumes exaggerated French accent*

"You saleevate, but you can't reesist!"
That's exactly how I fry an egg as well. I've started eating fried egg on untoasted bread because I value a runny yolk and a slice of untoasted bread soaks up the yolk better.
 

Katerina

Fresh Blood
Joined
Apr 10, 2021
Messages
4
Reaction score
17
Points
3
Salmonella is truly horrible. I've heard people say it's the most ill they've ever felt and they'd wanted to die.

As has been mentioned, the danger is mainly from contamination of the shells. I've never washed eggs before cooking them but I bet anyone who's had salmonella does. If they'll even have eggs in the house, that is.

Because duck eggs have larger pores than hen eggs they used to be notorious for passing on salmonella. Old household management books warn sternly against buying or eating them.
Funnily enough, our local health agency recommends you don’t wash eggs, saying it’s more likely to spread any salmonella to the inside of the egg.
 

escargot

Disciple of Marduk
Joined
Aug 24, 2001
Messages
37,934
Reaction score
57,050
Points
334
Location
HM The Tower of London
Funnily enough, our local health agency recommends you don’t wash eggs, saying it’s more likely to spread any salmonella to the inside of the egg.
Yup, but people who've had that sort of experience might feel it necessary. If they'll even have eggs in the house, as I mentioned.
It's not about being rational.
 
Top