Kids Today

EnolaGaia

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It would have been more trendy to use a flying drone, but I suppose a passé radio-controlled car was the better approach.
Boy suspected of using remote control car to smuggle drugs

California authorities have arrested a 16-year-old boy suspected of using a remote-controlled car to transport $106,000 worth of methamphetamine across the border.

The San Diego Union-Tribune reported Tuesday that the boy was arrested Sunday near the Otay Mesa Port of Entry in San Diego.

Border patrol agents say they believe someone on the south of the U.S.-Mexico border was able to slip the car filled with drugs through a gap in the fencing and then drive it to the teen waiting on the other side.

Authorities say an agent found the boy hiding near the border Sunday with a toy car and 50 packages of methamphetamine weighing more than 55 pounds (25 kilograms).

Authorities say the car would have had to make multiple trips to transport the drugs.
SOURCE: https://apnews.com/1736c14e4ada4b2ab3df5de95e7cb6ee
 

michael59

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t would have been more trendy to use a flying drone, but I suppose a passé radio-controlled car was the better approach.
Authorities are pretty much on to drones carrying/transporting drugs. It was actually a good idea except that the teen didn't check his surroundings out in advance. I wonder how long they were doing that before they got caught.
 

EnolaGaia

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Authorities are pretty much on to drones carrying/transporting drugs. It was actually a good idea except that the teen didn't check his surroundings out in advance. I wonder how long they were doing that before they got caught.
A drone would have been a stupid approach to try at the border - it's too easily detected.

It probably wasn't a great idea to sit in one place until the "recipient" had accumulated that large a load of contraband. It would have taken a while for the R/C car to transport the packages, and that would have increased the probability of the boy being spotted and surveilled for suspicious behavior.
 

Graylien

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Well. I'd just use a dog. Put a large raincoat on it, and tape me drugs inside. I'd walk the bugger for a few months till the border guards got used to seeing it. Actually several dogs. But they'd all look pretty much the same. Something harmless looking like a giant poodle. I'd call them all Jim Bowen. After that chap from that thing. Spray the drugs with Cologne to throw the sniffer dogs off the scent.

Or I'd just drive through the border with me drugs in the inner tube of my tyres. Specially made, obviously. They wouldn't have to last long. Swop 'em over a mile each side. Pretend I had a puncture if anyone passed by.

Or just use an unknowing mule. Say a hitchhiker. Chat to them, find out what hostel they were staying in. Get em out of the car to take a photo of me at a Service Station. Meanwhile my mate slips my drug consignment in their suitcase. Then if they get caught at the border, plead ignorance. Then quietly retrieve the drugs by sending them into say a shop to buy me something, while I either get the drugs out, or just drive off and leave them there. Go through their luggage, nick their passport, and set myself up with a nice little false identity. Then anonymously call the Mexican police, and say I'd seen them looking all shifty and they'd tried to sell me drugs in the toilet of the service station. Put on a posh accent. The police pick them up and what do they find? The drugs I've planted in their back pocket, that's what! Plus an obviously fake passport and some obviously fake currency in a wallet!

Or just drop 'em off before the border. Let some other bugger take em through. Tail them, then intercept them as they get out. Take 'em down an alley and tell them to open their blinking suitcase. Give 'em a little cut on the cheek with me blade, and say, keep it to yourself, mate. And by the way, I took some photos of my drugs in your suitcase with your nametag on. Plus there's traces on your clothes from when I was being all friendly and gave you that hug. So I'd keep quiet if I were you. Unless you want me to slice off your Jacobs.

Now, here's 50 quid. Go forth and prosper!
 
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INT21

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I'd just shoot him. No need to ask why.

Problem solved.
 

INT21

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Greylien,

Still doing Brubeck impersonations ?
 

EnolaGaia

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At face value, this appears to be an overly elaborate approach to simply running away.
Teen girl sneaks into small plane, drives it into fence

A 17-year-old girl was arrested Wednesday after authorities say she sneaked into a small plane at an airport in central California and drove it into a chain-link fence.

The teenager breached the fence of Fresno Yosemite International Airport, started up the plane and crashed it into a fence, airport spokeswoman Vikkie Calderon told The Fresno Bee.

Airport officials said officers found the teen in the pilot’s seat, wearing the pilot’s headset.

No one was injured. No passenger planes were in danger, Calderon said.

The teen was arrested on suspicion of theft of an aircraft. She will be booked into the juvenile hall after officers finish questioning her.

The girl’s mother told Fresno news station KFSN-TV that she hadn’t heard from her daughter since Tuesday night.
SOURCE: https://apnews.com/730bb62c320d0890a8a0f303c261a4d6
 

Min Bannister

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I can't help feeling a bit concerned for young people sometimes. Walking on the beach at the weekend, I heard a father having a conversation with a small child on his shoulders. He was saying that you couldn't make nature safe and that it wasn't supposed to be safe. Where is such a young child getting the idea that the beach is not safe? A few months ago I also overheard another child, a little older maybe 8 or 9, explaining to his older brother that he shouldn't be thrown into the sea as he had to look after his mental health. How did they get so worried about everything?
 

Carl Grove

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I can't help feeling a bit concerned for young people sometimes. Walking on the beach at the weekend, I heard a father having a conversation with a small child on his shoulders. He was saying that you couldn't make nature safe and that it wasn't supposed to be safe. Where is such a young child getting the idea that the beach is not safe? A few months ago I also overheard another child, a little older maybe 8 or 9, explaining to his older brother that he shouldn't be thrown into the sea as he had to look after his mental health. How did they get so worried about everything?
Just take a look at the headlines in the newspapers and the news on TV... if the destruction of our climate, the growth of international terrorism, economic collapse, the growing number of murders and other violent crimes (most fuelled by drink and drugs), political unrest, spread of diseases, pollution, poverty, and the dumbing down of our media, don't give reason for worry -- then what does?
 

GNC

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We're actually living in safer times than we realise, though the climate is a pressing concern, but the prevailing mood is one of anger stoked by social media. You get comfortable, you find something to get angry about, seems to be the pattern. Fortunately, channelling the hatred online is about the extent of it - it's when people are guided by it IRL that it's a worry.
 

Mythopoeika

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Nothing is worse, the world's always had awful shit going on. We just hear about it all now.
I think that's essentially true. The Internet and social media enable us to see the world, warts 'n all.
Before, we were kept blissfully ignorant.
Politicians don't like it as their every failing and indiscretion is exposed on a daily basis.
 

GNC

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I think that's essentially true. The Internet and social media enable us to see the world, warts 'n all.
Before, we were kept blissfully ignorant.
Politicians don't like it as their every failing and indiscretion is exposed on a daily basis.
Not just politicians - everyone's failings are obsessed over. If we could just accept we're all fallible then that could be the basis for progress. Hark at me - the idealist!
 

Min Bannister

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Just take a look at the headlines in the newspapers and the news on TV... if the destruction of our climate, the growth of international terrorism, economic collapse, the growing number of murders and other violent crimes (most fuelled by drink and drugs), political unrest, spread of diseases, pollution, poverty, and the dumbing down of our media, don't give reason for worry -- then what does?
That is not what they were worried about though. It is more fundamental than that. They should be able to walk (or be carried) on the beach or throw each other into the sea without being worried about health and safety or their mental health. I wonder if children are being so over-protected now that it is just making them fragile?
 

GNC

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That is not what they were worried about though. It is more fundamental than that. They should be able to walk (or be carried) on the beach or throw each other into the sea without being worried about health and safety or their mental health. I wonder if children are being so over-protected now that it is just making them fragile?
Do you mean that idea that kids get so many allergies now because they're not allowed to go out and play and get dirty and bolster their immune systems? Could that be applied to their mental health as well?
 

Yithian

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I asked for a show or hands from a (small) class of ten-year-olds: not one had climbed a tree.

I'm resigned to the fact that the world is and will continue to become quite a different place to the one I grew up with, and I appreciate that these were city kids and ai had a semi-rural childhood, but this surprised me and troubled me slightly.

Also, swimming in the sea: increasingly not a thing parents let kids do.
 

Min Bannister

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Do you mean that idea that kids get so many allergies now because they're not allowed to go out and play and get dirty and bolster their immune systems? Could that be applied to their mental health as well?
Yes, I think so.
 

JamesWhitehead

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Those of us trapped in the system have no alternative other than to try to increase the awareness of young people about dangers. If we don't, we may find ourselves paying a high price personally. Potential litigation, especially of the opportunistic no-win, no-fee variety, means we can not supervise a class with the complacent confidence that most kids are made out of rubber. We are meant to foresee problems. God help us, when multiple problems within an environment require repeated warnings . . .

Bear in mind that the majority of kids* now come from homes where mom or dad play on their phones, rather than look out for them.

I am reminded of the Victorian attitude to child-insurance. It got banned as a far too easy way to make money. :(

*A hard statistic to verify but it should be easy to illustrate, if it were legal to do so.
 
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EnolaGaia

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Do you mean that idea that kids get so many allergies now because they're not allowed to go out and play and get dirty and bolster their immune systems? Could that be applied to their mental health as well?
Yes and yes.

Over the decades I've been struck by how frequently and how substantially the children of my generational peers - most all of whom were raised in circumstances far more "hyper-hygienic" (both figuratively and literally ... ) than I - have been afflicted by allergies, syndromes, and disorders that weren't even recognized as specific issues when I was a kid. Now that I (and my peers) are old enough to see the second following generation the situation seems to be every bit as evident, if not worse.

I associate the key pivot point with the very late 1970s into the early 1980s. This was the time when members of my "boomer" generation were hitting their strides vocationally / financially and finally settling down to start and raise families. I found it strange that friends and similarly-aged relatives approached parenting in a manner akin to adopting a new hobby or undertaking a project. They obsessed about getting everything "right" and ensuring their children always had a maximally safe and enriched environment. Examples of this mania ranged from micro-managing the child's daily schedule to subscribing the child to all sorts of activities to keeping the entire house as clean as an operating theater.

It appeared to me the kids had lots of toys and social activities, but very little personal / alone time. They did a lot, but they didn't personally develop at a concomitant rate or extent. In effect, they were brought up as relatively passive little consumers who rarely had to adapt, be creative, fend for themselves, or deal with resistance or adversity.

The two most common deficiencies I've perceived are (a) a relatively low degree of self-development (i.e., generation of one's singular and own personality and personal style) and (b) an utter lack of imaginative capacity because they were constantly bombarded with face-value / explicit cues and never had to creatively generate their own games and stories.

Very generally speaking ... I see the same problem in both the physical / medical and the psychological / emotional dimensions. One learns from adversity, pure and simple. Smooth sailing is never informative and never educational. This is a general principle I've leveraged for decades in my own vocation(s), and it's a cornerstone of certain methodologies for which I'm credited as the originator.

Insulating kids from failures / troubles cannot help but insulate them from some (or at least some degree) of life's most critical learning experiences. This applies to their bodies (e.g., immune systems) as well as their minds and psyches.
 
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