Necrolog (Deaths Of Folks Who Had Impact On The Fortean World)

Founder

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Both smooch around West London so I'm not surprised there are no articles about them. JB hardly fitted the bill as being part of the upper-class Knightsbridge set.

FT was probably in its second or third year (1974 or 1975) year when JB drove out to Aldermaston, where I was staying with my parents. They ran the village store there for a while. JB kept in touch but that trailed off as he got into the business of providing questions and answers for quiz shows (or something like that). My last sighting of him was years later when a wonderful trove of Fortean and "unusual" newsclippings came up for auction. The owner had built a set of cabinets for the file cards. JB outbid everyone (I was penniless anyway, dammit!) and had a set of rolling archive storage units installed (so I heard). I was led to believe that JB just wanted to get his hands on data usable for his business; so I wrote to him (in Hampstead) but never had a reply. I wonder what happened to his data collection?

~b
 
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Zeke Newbold

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Sad news from Moscow.

Dmitry Bayanov, the investigator into the Russian snowman, or Alma, passed away,aged 88, a few days ago.

He had been suffering from heart related health problems for some time and spent most of his days in a dacha on the outskirts of Moscow.

He invented the term `Hominology` to describe his branch of unknown biped research - a term which became much used within Russia. He became one of the founding members of The International Cryptozoological Society.He is also credited in coining the monier `Patty` for the creature seen on the Patterson-Gimlin film (in which he was a firm believer).

He spoke good English, and in fact also worked as a translator. Crucially,this fact allowed him to liase with his Western counterparts. There are a number of his writings avalialable in English, but not so easy to get hold of. The best known is probably In The Footsteps of the Russian Snowman (1996).

However, if you want a cracking read, let me warmly recommend America's Bigfoot: Fact Not Fiction (1997). This is a recounting of the reception that the Patterson- Gimlin film received when it reached Russian soil in the Nineties, in the closing years of the Cold War. Bayanov puts up a spirited and seductive defence of the film's authenticity - but more than that, he paints a fascinating portrait of the world of snowman research as it existed in the Russia of that time. I read this in one sitting, gripped throughout.( I have said before on some thread or other on here that it is one of my all time favourite `Fortean` books).

https://www.amazon.com/Americas-Bigfoot-Russia-Anniversary-Patterson/dp/590022922X

Michael Trachtengerts died a year or so ago and now... this.

Trachtengerts, Bayanov and Igor Bourtsev, together, seemed like the Three Musketeers of Russian snowman advocacy - and now there is only one left. Igor Bourtsev, however, seems in good health and is - thankfully - very much still with us.

Here's how some of the Cryptozoological community has reacred to his passing:

http://www.cryptozoonews.com/bayanov-obit/
 

ramonmercado

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Erlendur Haraldsson was a professor emeritus of psychology on the faculty of social science at the University of Iceland. He published in various psychology and psychiatry journals. In addition, he published parapsychology books and authored a number of papers for parapsychology journals. He died on Nov. 22nd, 2020.

Carlos S. Alvarado, PhD, Research Fellow, Parapsychology Foundation:

I recently received the sad news that my friend, and well-known parapsychologist Erlendur Haraldsson, passed away. Here is a short biography of his background:

“Erlendur Haraldsson was born in Iceland in 1931. He studied philosophy at the University of Edinburgh (1955-1956) and the University of Freiburg (1956-1958), later studying psychology at Freiburg (1963-1966) and the University of Munich (1966-1969). In 1969-1970 he spent a year with Dr. J. B. Rhine at his Institute of Parapsychology in Durham, North Carolina, and in 1970-1971, he did an internship in clinical psychology at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville where he met Dr. Ian Stevenson, leading to a life-long association and the publication of joint papers. From 1971-1973 he worked with Dr. Karlis Osis at the American Society for Psychical Research in New York. He received a doctorate in psychology from the University of Freiburg in 1972, and became a lecturer and assistant professor at the University of Iceland in psychology in 1973; in 1989 he became a full professor, and in 1999, an emeritus professor. His research and publications have covered a wide range of religious and psychological topics, including mediums, reincarnation, and deathbed phenomena” (online here). More details about his life appear in an autobiography published in Icelandic. The parapsychological content of this book will be published in English around March by White Crow Books.

One thing that I always admired about Erlendur was his interest in many areas of parapsychology. Few people in the field have shown such wide interests, particularly when it comes to research. I always felt that his contributions to the investigation of mediumship and deathbed visions were very important, and reminded us of the issue of spontaneous cases and survival of death.

This is evident in his bibliography, which includes such areas as ESP experiments, deathbed visions and apparitions, recollection of previous lives, mediumship, Sathya Sai Baba, and other topics. A few examples of publications appear below. ...

https://carlossalvarado.wordpress.com/2020/11/24/erlendur-haraldsson-1931-2020/
 

gordonrutter

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Erlendur Haraldsson was a professor emeritus of psychology on the faculty of social science at the University of Iceland. He published in various psychology and psychiatry journals. In addition, he published parapsychology books and authored a number of papers for parapsychology journals. He died on Nov. 22nd, 2020.

Carlos S. Alvarado, PhD, Research Fellow, Parapsychology Foundation:

I recently received the sad news that my friend, and well-known parapsychologist Erlendur Haraldsson, passed away. Here is a short biography of his background:

“Erlendur Haraldsson was born in Iceland in 1931. He studied philosophy at the University of Edinburgh (1955-1956) and the University of Freiburg (1956-1958), later studying psychology at Freiburg (1963-1966) and the University of Munich (1966-1969). In 1969-1970 he spent a year with Dr. J. B. Rhine at his Institute of Parapsychology in Durham, North Carolina, and in 1970-1971, he did an internship in clinical psychology at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville where he met Dr. Ian Stevenson, leading to a life-long association and the publication of joint papers. From 1971-1973 he worked with Dr. Karlis Osis at the American Society for Psychical Research in New York. He received a doctorate in psychology from the University of Freiburg in 1972, and became a lecturer and assistant professor at the University of Iceland in psychology in 1973; in 1989 he became a full professor, and in 1999, an emeritus professor. His research and publications have covered a wide range of religious and psychological topics, including mediums, reincarnation, and deathbed phenomena” (online here). More details about his life appear in an autobiography published in Icelandic. The parapsychological content of this book will be published in English around March by White Crow Books.

One thing that I always admired about Erlendur was his interest in many areas of parapsychology. Few people in the field have shown such wide interests, particularly when it comes to research. I always felt that his contributions to the investigation of mediumship and deathbed visions were very important, and reminded us of the issue of spontaneous cases and survival of death.

This is evident in his bibliography, which includes such areas as ESP experiments, deathbed visions and apparitions, recollection of previous lives, mediumship, Sathya Sai Baba, and other topics. A few examples of publications appear below. ...

https://carlossalvarado.wordpress.com/2020/11/24/erlendur-haraldsson-1931-2020/
I posted about his death in the RIP thread forgetting we had this one!
 

Comfortably Numb

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Erlendur Haraldsson was a professor emeritus of psychology on the faculty of social science at the University of Iceland.
Although not someone being familiar with, I have found a decidedly appropriate artice, courtesy of the Oskaloosa Independent, Kansas, 6 March 1997:

The_Oskaloosa_Independent_Thu__Mar_6__1997__compress89.jpg
 

Min Bannister

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Noo, really sorry to hear that. Such an interesting researcher and properly open minded. His books are fascinating. A great loss. RIP.

(I kind of knew it would be him when I saw this thread had been posted it though which he might have liked maybe?)
 

Swifty

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A learned yesterday that Diane Berthelot passed away in May last year. Diane was the woman in this famous ghost photograph taken at Worsted Church in Norfolk in 1975. Both Diane and her husband were adamant that no one else was with them apart from their son, her husband took this photograph which has been reproduced in many books and magazines. Sadly I also won't now be able to video interview her as we were hoping to do.

achurchdiane.jpg


Skip to 0:50 in this video


Diane lived with her husband Peter in North Walsham not far from me and wrote to Fortean Times to dispute someone's suggestion that the figure sitting behind her was facing away from her (Fortean Times #266, Sept 2010)

Worsted Church is said to be famous for a number of sightings of a white lady ghost with reports pre dating this picture. Happily, Diane's experience seems to have had a positive impact on her life.

I was healed by a ghost...and there's a photo to prove it | Weird | News | Express.co.uk

Diane's obituary:

https://www.myfuneralnotices.com/notices/view/4699488/diane-phyllis-berthelot
 
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lordmongrove

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Marie-Jeanne Koffmann the Franco-Russian almasty researcher has passed away in Paris just 11 days before her 102nd birthday. An incredible woman, perhaps the most dedicated almasty researcher ever she spent decades in the field but saw the creature only once.. What a long and interesting life she lead. I would have loved to have met her. As far as i know she never turned her copious field notes into a book.I only hope her notes and work are archived. Inspirational.
216313199_10220000891153089_6780073235119573495_n.jpg
 

ramonmercado

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Loren Coleman's obit for Marie-Jeanne Koffmann.

Born on July 19, 1919, Marie-Jeanne Koffmann, passed away on July 11, 2021, in Paris, just short of her 102nd birthday, reports Igor Bourtsev and French hominology sites. Koffmann was a dedicated fieldworker and chronicler on the Almasty. The Almasty (sometimes termed the Kaptar) are the wild hominids reported from the Caucasus, the mountainous range that sits on the intersection of Europe and Asia, stretching from the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea. ...

http://www.cryptozoonews.com/mjkoffmann-obit/
 

Vardoger

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Loren Coleman's obit for Marie-Jeanne Koffmann.

Born on July 19, 1919, Marie-Jeanne Koffmann, passed away on July 11, 2021, in Paris, just short of her 102nd birthday, reports Igor Bourtsev and French hominology sites. Koffmann was a dedicated fieldworker and chronicler on the Almasty. The Almasty (sometimes termed the Kaptar) are the wild hominids reported from the Caucasus, the mountainous range that sits on the intersection of Europe and Asia, stretching from the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea. ...

http://www.cryptozoonews.com/mjkoffmann-obit/
Crypto Zoo News has turned into an obituary magazine for dead cryptozoologists and paranormal researchers.
 

Sharon Hill

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Crypto Zoo News has turned into an obituary magazine for dead cryptozoologists and paranormal researchers.
Tragedy leaching. In some situations, it's a kind service, in others, it's just yucky.
 

Sharon Hill

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Another cryptid-researcher has died: Scott Mardis was a decent guy. Strange ideas, but very nice.
 

Vardoger

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Cryptozoologist author Michael Newton died in September.
http://www.cryptozoonews.com/newton-obit/

I've noticed that Loren's CryptozooNews page is entirely obituaries. The old-school idea of cryptozoology is dying, literally and figuratively.
Surprisingly many relatively young cryptozoologists are dying. Not saying there's a conspiracy behind it though.
 

Mythopoeika

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Surprisingly many relatively young cryptozoologists are dying. Not saying there's a conspiracy behind it though.
I guess being a cryptozoologist is not without its hazards.
 

lordmongrove

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Cryptozoologist author Michael Newton died in September.
http://www.cryptozoonews.com/newton-obit/

I've noticed that Loren's CryptozooNews page is entirely obituaries. The old-school idea of cryptozoology is dying, literally and figuratively.
Not from where i'm standing. Just back from a lecturing at a conference in London. It was pack with people interested in cryoptozoology, many new to the subject. I also filmed a documentary on the almasty for Discovery a few weeks ago and the producer says there is more interest in cryptozoology than any other subject. There is plenty of new blood in cryptozoology.
 

lordmongrove

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I guess being a cryptozoologist is not without its hazards.
Well i've been attacked by a spitting cobra, stalked by a tiger, feasted ion by hoards of leeches and mozzies, almost fell off a cliff, almost slid down an ice crevasse and almost got swept away by rapids. Russia in particular really seemed to have it in for me.
 

Sharon Hill

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Not from where i'm standing. Just back from a lecturing at a conference in London. It was pack with people interested in cryoptozoology, many new to the subject. I also filmed a documentary on the almasty for Discovery a few weeks ago and the producer says there is more interest in cryptozoology than any other subject. There is plenty of new blood in cryptozoology.
First, is that only in the UK? I see it somewhat differently in the US. It IS more popular than ever but not as a research field and certainly not as "scientific". It's an aesthetic - people want an enchanted world full of the mysterious and monsters.

Second, it is a lot of new people having a look, many young adults, and lots of women. Also, people of color. But, again, it's not anything to do with zoology - it's esoterica, black magic, and demons. That's what I meant by the dying of old-school cryptozoology. Most people interested in the field today know nothing of the history or the scholarship, or Heuvelmans for that matter. They believe in shapeshifting dogmen and psychic harbingers of doom.

Or, they are having fun making spooky legends into identity icons, which, frankly, is the current tone of cryptozoology in pop culture, like it or not.
6506ee2247f8c9e20ff90c4c301f5e72.jpg
 

lordmongrove

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First, is that only in the UK? I see it somewhat differently in the US. It IS more popular than ever but not as a research field and certainly not as "scientific". It's an aesthetic - people want an enchanted world full of the mysterious and monsters.

Second, it is a lot of new people having a look, many young adults, and lots of women. Also, people of color. But, again, it's not anything to do with zoology - it's esoterica, black magic, and demons. That's what I meant by the dying of old-school cryptozoology. Most people interested in the field today know nothing of the history or the scholarship, or Heuvelmans for that matter. They believe in shapeshifting dogmen and psychic harbingers of doom.

Or, they are having fun making spooky legends into identity icons, which, frankly, is the current tone of cryptozoology in pop culture, like it or not.
View attachment 48101
I don't think any of the above creatures are real apart from the Mongolian deathworm and The Loch Ness Monster if it's a huge fish. Yes some people dabble in it for esoteric reasons or because they think it's about fairy tail type, impossible beasts. Lots of people dabble in all areas of forteana. But there are many up and coming young cryptozoologists who take this seriously. Dr Max Blake for one, Florent Berrere, Karac St. Laurent, Carl Marshall, Saskia England, Nate Brislin the list goes on. I think many of these will be doing field research for years to come.
 

Mythopoeika

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I don't think any of the above creatures are real apart from the Mongolian deathworm and The Loch Ness Monster if it's a huge fish. Yes some people dabble in it for esoteric reasons or because they think it's about fairy tail type, impossible beasts. Lots of people dabble in all areas of forteana. But there are many up and coming young cryptozoologists who take this seriously. Dr Max Blake for one, Florent Berrere, Karac St. Laurent, Carl Marshall, Saskia England, Nate Brislin the list goes on. I think many of these will be doing field research for years to come.
I would really like the Mongolian deathworm one to be true, although I strongly suspect its attributes have been somewhat embroidered.
I think it must be found eventually.
 

GNC

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How come a Nessie yells a lot but everyone is shocked when they swear? Surely swearing and yelling are bedfellows?
 
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