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Min Bannister

Possessed dog
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A stock photo of a therapeutic injection bruise:

alcohol-and-humira-injection-bruise.jpg


I’ve read accounts by women who mention “pinpricks” and “scratches”; the above image depicts the result of an injection that delivered a meaningful quantity of medication.

Anyone who wouldn’t notice this, or its administration, doesn’t require any further medication!

maximus otter
Yes, that is definitely noticeable! But I was thinking more of the weirdo with a needle you mentioned above, since as already noted, it would be very difficult to actually administer intravenous drugs to an unwilling recipient. So there could be some truth in the reports, even if drugs were not involved.

Any reports I've seen have only mentioned that people 'felt that they'd been injected', presumably they checked out the site where the person thought they'd been injected and found no sign of injection.
Presumably! But it would be good to know one way or another. It would sort out the question of whether it is some sort of mass hysteria or whether people really were being stuck with needles in night clubs.
 

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
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Messages
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…the weirdo with a needle you mentioned above. So there could be some truth in the reports, even if drugs were not involved.


…whether it is some sort of mass hysteria or whether people really were being stuck with needles in night clubs.

As l joked upthread:

I’d bet that if we started a UL about blue Smarties containing a “date-rape drug”, within days girls would be staring in bemusement at the azure croutons bobbing about in their Porn Star Martinis.”

Someone thought they’d been jabbed, doubtless reported it on Twitface, and inadvertently created an avalanche of “Me too!”; leading to some male nutcases who are happy to oblige.

A perfect storm of no cause, but lots of effect.

maximus otter
 

catseye

Old lady trouser-smell with yesterday's knickers
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Yes, that is definitely noticeable! But I was thinking more of the weirdo with a needle you mentioned above, since as already noted, it would be very difficult to actually administer intravenous drugs to an unwilling recipient. So there could be some truth in the reports, even if drugs were not involved.


Presumably! But it would be good to know one way or another. It would sort out the question of whether it is some sort of mass hysteria or whether people really were being stuck with needles in night clubs.
I think there are two different panics at work here. There's the 'oh my god, someone tried to inject me with something!' otherwise known as some unpleasant person wandering around with a sharp object and poking women with the intent to cause upset; versus the 'oh my god, someone injected me with a drug which made me lose consciousness/lose memory etc'. One is entirely plausible because there's nowt so queer as folk, and the other is practically an impossibility for reasons listed by @maximus otter and is more likely going to be due to either drink spiking or just people losing track of exactly how much they really had to drink.
 

ramonmercado

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It's an urban myth.

The British Needle-Spiking Panic​

Social panic amidst reports of British women being surreptitiously injected.​

Posted February 20, 2022 | Reviewed by Kaja Perina

KEY POINTS​

  • Claims of syringe attacks on British women may be an urban myth.
  • Despite over 1300 'attacks' in the past 6 months, there is yet to be a single confirmed case or conviction.
  • To inject someone with a needle at a nightclub while out with friends - and without anyone realizing -defies credulity.
Anyone who believes they were drugged while out on the town should be taken seriously, and their claims thoroughly investigated. However, a recent wave of spiking reports involving syringes, has all the hallmarks of a social panic.

In autumn 2021, shocking reports began to appear across Britain about a new danger to young women: needle spiking. Typically, the victim was out clubbing with friends when she reported feeling woozy after consuming a small amount of alcohol. She would pass out and be taken home or to a hospital by friends. The next day, she had difficulty remembering what happened. Later, after examining their bodies, many claim to have found a pin prick, scratch or bruise that was assumed to be an injection site.

One high profile case involved Sarah Buckle, a University of Nottingham student who was out clubbing when she blacked out. She later woke up in hospital, unable to recall the events of the previous night. The possibility she may have been ‘spiked’ was only considered after attending medics mentioned it. That’s when she noticed a tiny pinprick on her hand. ...

https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/its-catching/202202/the-british-needle-spiking-panic
 

catseye

Old lady trouser-smell with yesterday's knickers
Joined
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Messages
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It's an urban myth.

The British Needle-Spiking Panic​

Social panic amidst reports of British women being surreptitiously injected.​

Posted February 20, 2022 | Reviewed by Kaja Perina

KEY POINTS​

  • Claims of syringe attacks on British women may be an urban myth.
  • Despite over 1300 'attacks' in the past 6 months, there is yet to be a single confirmed case or conviction.
  • To inject someone with a needle at a nightclub while out with friends - and without anyone realizing -defies credulity.
Anyone who believes they were drugged while out on the town should be taken seriously, and their claims thoroughly investigated. However, a recent wave of spiking reports involving syringes, has all the hallmarks of a social panic.

In autumn 2021, shocking reports began to appear across Britain about a new danger to young women: needle spiking. Typically, the victim was out clubbing with friends when she reported feeling woozy after consuming a small amount of alcohol. She would pass out and be taken home or to a hospital by friends. The next day, she had difficulty remembering what happened. Later, after examining their bodies, many claim to have found a pin prick, scratch or bruise that was assumed to be an injection site.

One high profile case involved Sarah Buckle, a University of Nottingham student who was out clubbing when she blacked out. She later woke up in hospital, unable to recall the events of the previous night. The possibility she may have been ‘spiked’ was only considered after attending medics mentioned it. That’s when she noticed a tiny pinprick on her hand. ...

https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/its-catching/202202/the-british-needle-spiking-panic
I don't like to say 'I told you so'.

But I did.
 

Sid

Justified & Ancient
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Messages
2,015
Okay but even so a glass of vodka is really an awful lot of vodka!
Maybe that's the point (pun intended), if someone is a bit whizzy after drinking something like vodka, I imagine that they might not feel the point of a needle entering their skin, in the same way that they definitely would if sober - fore instance, getting the jab!
 

Min Bannister

Possessed dog
Joined
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Messages
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Maybe that's the point (pun intended), if someone is a bit whizzy after drinking something like vodka, I imagine that they might not feel the point of a needle entering their skin, in the same way that they definitely would if sober - fore instance, getting the jab!
I think what they were trying to say is that she had said she only consumed a small amount of alcohol but actually had had more than she thought and so was drunk rather than drugged. But unless they meant a shot of vodka, then a glass would get you pretty drunk even without extra whisky and beer. :crazy:
 

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
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Messages
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The French catch up with le panic de jour:

"Fear on the dance floor as disco needle attacks baffle France


Alarm is spreading on dance floors in France following needle attacks on dozens of young people in nightclubs, with police in the dark as to the assailants' identity or motives.

The victims, who are mostly women, report the sudden onset of identical symptoms -- nausea, dizziness and sharp pain -- while out partying, and only later detect a needle prick on their skin, a red dot surrounded by a blue circular bruise."

https://news.yahoo.com/fear-dance-floor-disco-needle-144505185.html?fr=sycsrp_catchall

maximus otter
 

Frideswide

Fortea Morgana :) PeteByrdie certificated Princess
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detect a needle prick on their skin, a red dot surrounded by a blue circular bruise."

I don't think I've ever had that as a reaction to any jag. Is it just me having hide like a rhino?
 

catseye

Old lady trouser-smell with yesterday's knickers
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I sometimes bruise after an injection.

But re the spiking (needle-drugging rather than drink), even Reddit, which can be a bastion of the credulous, doesn't believe in it.
 

charliebrown

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My wife’s unmarried older sister has always lived in Manhattan, NY.

Several years ago, a crazy man started to attacking people on the subway with a needle and syringe and the older sister got stuck.

The older sister went for HIV tests for awhile after the incident, and thankfully she was OK.

The crazy man was never caught.
 

Frideswide

Fortea Morgana :) PeteByrdie certificated Princess
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My wife’s unmarried older sister has always lived in Manhattan, NY.

Several years ago, a crazy man started to attacking people on the subway with a needle and syringe and the older sister got stuck.

The older sister went for HIV tests for awhile after the incident, and thankfully she was OK.

The crazy man was never caught.

that's awful @charliebrown :(
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
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Eblana
More on the French needle attacks.

Across France, more than 300 people have reported being pricked out of the blue with needles at nightclubs or concerts in recent months.

Doctors and multiple prosecutors are working on the case, but no-one knows who is doing it or why, and whether the victims have been injected with drugs – or indeed any substance at all.

Club owners and police are trying to raise awareness, and a rapper even interrupted his recent show to warn concert-goers about the risk of surprise needle attacks.

It’s not just France: the UK Government is studying a spate of “needle spiking” there, and police in Belgium and the Netherlands are also investigating scattered cases.

https://www.breakingnews.ie/world/nightclub-needle-attacks-puzzle-european-authorities-1314714.html
 

JahaRa

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That reminds me, I have a couple of syringes I used for the dog when he was sick that I need to dispose of. I guess I need to go to the casino and put them in their needle box in one of the bathrooms.
 

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
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Messages
11,564
French police have arrested a man suspected of numerous attacks. Lumpy Google Translate of the French site:

Wild bites in the evening: several complaints this weekend, what we know about the first suspect arrested

Since the beginning of March, nearly 350 complaints have been filed across France for syringe attacks. A first suspect was arrested on Saturday June 4, during an evening in Toulon A first in these unexplained cases of mysterious syringe attacks. An individual was arrested on the night of Friday to Saturday June 4 on a beach in Toulon, in the Var, during the recording of a TF1 program. He allegedly assaulted several people with a syringe. According to "Le Figaro", a judicial investigation was opened and the suspect was remanded in custody.

What is the profile of the suspect? In addition to the fourteen complaints, the Toulon prosecutor's office recorded 21 reports during the evening. To these are added two people, who, during an altercation, formally saw the individual implicated with a syringe, they reported to justice. He is a 20-year-old man of Tunisian origin. Without a residence permit and without a job, the man is known to the courts. In a state of legal recidivism, he has already been sentenced in 2020 for domestic violence on his partner, who would have been heard this weekend. When questioned, the individual continues to deny the facts, said Toulon prosecutor Samuel Finielz.

https://www.sudouest.fr/faits-diver...mier-suspect-interpelle-a-toulon-11209605.php

maximus otter
 

ramonmercado

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Eblana
Apparently this woman was injected with morphine. It would have been impossible to prove that it happened in the nightclub (without cctv evidence etc) though given that she waited two days before reporting it to police.

A woman who had been injected with morphine in a nightclub waited five months for test results after reporting the attack to the police.

Becca Collins, 20, said she was spiked while on a night out in Maidstone, Kent, on 30 October 2021. She only received the result at the end of March, when she followed up her report. Kent Police has acknowledged the delay and said it intends to learn from the experience.

Ms Collins was attacked during a visit to a club.

"After 12 o'clock I don't remember any of the night," she said, "the next thing I remember is waking up in my brother's apartment the next morning. I felt really unwell, more than just a hangover. I thought this has to be more than just alcohol, and I went to have a bath and noticed the mark on my leg that would indicate a needle."

She reported the incident to Kent Police two days later.

"Initially the police were helpful," she said, "they passed it over to their team in Tonbridge allocated to deal with spikings, but I think after they realised they wouldn't be able to put any evidence on someone they did give up on the case."

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-kent-63782642
 

ramonmercado

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"On Monday morning she contacted her GP about what had happened, but was refused a blood test."

Would a GP refuse a blood test in these circumstances? I'm surprised she isn't suing the practice and reporting the GP for professional misconduct if it actually happened.

It was during a night out with friends in the Suffolk town of Ipswich that Chloe Ward's speech became slurred and she passed out. She had been spiked by injection. A year on from the incident, with her attacker still at large, she remains too scared to go for a night out with friends.

"I feel like I'm losing out on living my 20s and having fun," the 23-year-old Ms Ward said. "It's been difficult." She explained how during the first few months after she was spiked by injection she was too scared to go anywhere.

"Even going to a supermarket felt really scary because you can't trust people any more," said Ms Ward, of Trimley St Martin, near Felixstowe. I don't enjoy going out any more and it's sad to say that. Going out was my idea of having a really good night with friends, forgetting about everything, enjoying the time and making memories. It's hard because my friends still go out, but I don't want to, so I'm missing out."

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-suffolk-63960790
 

ChasFink

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Messages
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Would a GP refuse a blood test in these circumstances? I'm surprised she isn't suing the practice and reporting the GP for professional misconduct if it actually happened.
A blood test for what? You have to have some idea what you're looking for. And what were the results of the test she did get?
 

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
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a) It was during a night out with friends in the Suffolk town of Ipswich that Chloe Ward's speech became slurred and she passed out.

b) She had been spiked by injection.

1. - Because the only reason that a 23-year-old passes out on a night out is being injected with unknown drugs by an unknown assailant.

2. Hysterical, entitled female rings doctor days after alleged incident demanding a blood test, and expresses astonishment that he doesn’t comply with her demand automatically.

The only “evidence” here is her assertion that a bruise on her hip matches a “needle hole” in her clothing. How much of a hole do we think would be left in fabric by the passage of a hypodermic needle through it? A large, obvious one like the one depicted? l don’t think so.

I was once on duty at the public enquiry desk when an apparently rational young man walked in with a fry-up on a plate, covered in cling film. My initial gratitude soon faded, because he told me that he believed that his landlord was trying to poison him by frying his food in engine oil.

Imagine, Dear Reader, how much scientific analysis that sample received…

:rofl:

maximus otter
 
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catseye

Old lady trouser-smell with yesterday's knickers
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1. - Because the only reason that a 23-year-old passes out on a night out is being injected with unknown drugs by an unknown assailant.

2. Hysterical, entitled female rings doctor days after alleged incident demanding a blood test, and expresses astonishment that he doesn’t comply with her demand automatically.

The only “evidence” here is her assertion that a bruise on her hip matches a “needle hole” in her clothing. How much of a hole do we think would be left in fabric by the passage of a hypodermic needle through it? A large, obvious one like the one depicted? l don’t think so.

I was once on duty at the public enquiry desk when an apparently rational young man walked in with a fry-up on a plate, covered in cling film. My initial gratitude soon faded, because he told me that he believed that his landlord was trying to poison him by frying his food in engine oil.

Imagine, Dear Reader, how much scientific analysis that sample received…

:rofl:

maximus otter
Am I also a cynic for seeing 'compensation payment' looming large? All the 'I'm missing out on my twenties' and 'I'm afraid even to go to the supermarket'? I can understand that it may be a frightening scenario, but I'm not sure that 'passing out on a night out and waking up with a hangover' is particularly indicative of being spiked with morphine...
 

Cochise

Priest of the cult of the Dog with the Broken Paw
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We live in an age of hysteria. Obviously there have been outbreaks of collective or mass hysteria (difference being no. of people affected) throughout history, but a combination of :

a) the MSM - which have been getting gradually worse on this for 150 years until now there is hardly a serious outlet of record left

b) politicians who've learned to use propaganda to induce hysteria to their ends - goes back at least as far as WW1

c) the modern development of (particularly) the World Wide Web - internet was relatively sane before that

have created a febrile society where a one off - possibly not even real - incident can create a country wide or even world wide outbreak of mass hysterical gibbering in hours.

They are not new - one can think of examples in the 30's like the War of the Worlds panic and the Mattoon Gasser as isolated relatively small scale events with no political involvement. You could even go back to our old friend Jack - choose Ripper or Springheel according to preference.

But now they are continuous.
 
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ChasFink

Justified & Ancient
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1. - Because the only reason that a 23-year-old passes out on a night out is being injected with unknown drugs by an unknown assailant.

2. Hysterical, entitled female rings doctor days after alleged incident demanding a blood test, and expresses astonishment that he doesn’t comply with her demand automatically.

The only “evidence” here is her assertion that a bruise on her hip matches a “needle hole” in her clothing. How much of a hole do we think would be left in fabric by the passage of a hypodermic needle through it? A large, obvious one like the one depicted? l don’t think so.

I was once on duty at the public enquiry desk when an apparently rational young man walked in with a fry-up on a plate, covered in cling film. My initial gratitude soon faded, because he told me that he believed that his landlord was trying to poison him by frying his food in engine oil.

Imagine, Dear Reader, how much scientific analysis that sample received…

:rofl:

maximus otter
Let me be clear. I don't doubt that something more happened than this young woman losing track of her drinking and getting drunk. But let's look at the situation.

She has a hole in her clothes and a bruise in the same area. This could have been due to sitting on a loose nail on a barstool. If someone actually did inject her with something, to what end? She was with friends and immediately sought medical help, and I think this would easily have been predicted by a potential attacker. Nothing short of a sick desire to simply incapacitate her would be the motive, and that perp would have continued with this activity and likely been caught by now. More likely is her drinks were made overly strong, she hadn't had enough to eat, she suffered some odd medical incident, or (still not very likely) a drink was spiked by someone not realizing she was not a good target for further crime.

Clearly she feels scared to go out or enjoy her 20s, whatever that means. She needs counseling to get over her irrational fears - which, statistically speaking, would be just as irrational if she had been injected.
 
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