• We have updated the guidelines regarding posting political content: please see the stickied thread on Website Issues.

Not As Environmentally Friendly As Promised

True, they do have their downsides. However, apart from hydroelectric dams, the ones you mention don't use up huge tracts of land that could be used for farming. Solar is the worst for that - it occupies land formerly used for crop-growing or as pasture land.

Solar farms can be located in deserts though in some countries.
 
True, they do have their downsides. However, apart from hydroelectric dams, the ones you mention don't use up huge tracts of land that could be used for farming. Solar is the worst for that - it occupies land formerly used for crop-growing or as pasture land.
Interestingly, in Pennsylvania, we promote solar farms on reclaimed coal mine lands. I’ve also seen them in deserts out west and on commercial properties. So, it’s not being used much on viable farmland.
 
Granted Pennsylvania is half the size of the UK but with a population of around 13 million, the energy needs are way below the UK’s 67 million. (I think I have my figures right) We’re looking at a future energy crisis over here.
 
What about solar farms on land that's already in use, such as factory roofs, carparks, industrial parks etc.?
In Nottingham, there's a sports centre that installed panels over their carpark and they use the energy generated.
 
If you were to fill the deserts with solar panels and use that power to make hydrogen
you would have a reasonably reliable source of greenish energy. ok many countries would
still be at the mercy of others for energy but it could bump start the cheap green energy
supply.
 
If you were to fill the deserts with solar panels and use that power to make hydrogen
you would have a reasonably reliable source of greenish energy. ok many countries would
still be at the mercy of others for energy but it could bump start the cheap green energy
supply.
I believe that some countries are doing this but not for making hydrogen
 
  • Like
Reactions: RaM
Yes but making hydrogen could avoid the problems of storage and loss due to resistance in wires that you get with regular solar farms.
 
  • Like
Reactions: RaM
If you were to fill the deserts with solar panels and use that power to make hydrogen
you would have a reasonably reliable source of greenish energy. ok many countries would
still be at the mercy of others for energy but it could bump start the cheap green energy
supply.
They've used solar water heating panels in Israel since the 1950s and all new homes have to have them since the 1980s.
You can see one behind me here that I am thoughtfully modelling for you;
Aramshe.jpg
 
Interestingly, in Pennsylvania, we promote solar farms on reclaimed coal mine lands. I’ve also seen them in deserts out west and on commercial properties. So, it’s not being used much on viable farmland.
Different story over here. The UK doesn't have much land to spare.
By comparison, each state In the US (barring maybe a couple of exceptions) has lots of land for all kinds of uses.
 
What about solar farms on land that's already in use, such as factory roofs, carparks, industrial parks etc.?
In Nottingham, there's a sports centre that installed panels over their carpark and they use the energy generated.
That is exactly what we should be doing with new builds, yes.
 
Sorry it’s the Mail but it is making interesting point. I laugh every time I hear the TFL advert that says so many of their buses have ‘zero emissions at tailpipe’, that just tells me there’s awful emissions elsewhere.

Electric cars release more toxic emissions than petrol-powered vehicles and are worse for the environment​



https://www.dailymail.co.uk/science...etrol-powered-vehicles-worse-environment.html
 
Sorry it’s the Mail but it is making interesting point. I laugh every time I hear the TFL advert that says so many of their buses have ‘zero emissions at tailpipe’, that just tells me there’s awful emissions elsewhere.

Electric cars release more toxic emissions than petrol-powered vehicles and are worse for the environment​



https://www.dailymail.co.uk/science...etrol-powered-vehicles-worse-environment.html
This study has not been peer-reviewed. It's not at all persuasive, either.
The brakes claim is false because EVs use regenerative braking, which wears down breaks much more slowly.
All cars create particulate matter. Why are we not having this discussion about all large vehicles, including 18-wheel trucks which are very heavy and use up tires at a much greater rate? It seems reasonable to address the roads and tires that everyone uses rather than ditch EVs.

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2024/feb/26/electric-cars-air-pollution-problem-brakes-tyres
 
Solar farms can be located in deserts though in some countries.
Even wind farms work better in deserts as the winds are more predictable. The US - you know, the terrible oil burners and polluters according to some - had desert wind farms back in the 1990's.
 
Why was it terror?

And there are plenty of grassed areas they could have driven into from the left lane (although not as many now that they have removed the hard shoulder).

Was the handbrake also incapacitated?
Handbrakes are a rare breed these days apparently. I like a nice physical handbrake.
 
I do question the statistics behind these results.
Apparently, according to the media, there were no car fires or breakdowns before EV's.
Note: the police Armed Response Unit car which had an engine fire at the traffic lights at the end of Earl's Court Road wasn't an electric vehicle. I should know - I was 'locked in' the pub opposite while the emergency services turned up.
 
I do question the statistics behind these results.
Apparently, according to the media, there were no car fires or breakdowns before EV's.
Note: the police Armed Response Unit car which had an engine fire at the traffic lights at the end of Earl's Court Road wasn't an electric vehicle. I should know - I was 'locked in' the pub opposite while the emergency services turned up.
Yes ICE cars do catch fire the trouble is EV fires are massive and hard to put out due to the batteries reaction.
 
Handbrakes are a rare breed these days apparently. I like a nice physical handbrake.
Why not put the car into neutral, stick the hazard lights on and steer to the hard shoulder? My car doesn't have a handbrake and the main problem it causes me is when driving Mrs T's car which does! It does have a switch to turn the handbrake on though.
 
Why not put the car into neutral, stick the hazard lights on and steer to the hard shoulder? My car doesn't have a handbrake and the main problem it causes me is when driving Mrs T's car which does! It does have a switch to turn the handbrake on though.
No hard shoulder on this stretch- (but there are occasional places where there is a grass verge), not to mention the emergency refuge areas.
 
Why not put the car into neutral, stick the hazard lights on and steer to the hard shoulder? My car doesn't have a handbrake and the main problem it causes me is when driving Mrs T's car which does! It does have a switch to turn the handbrake on though.
It says he did use the hard shoulder at times. No brake at all is freaky but it also seems to have been stuck in ‘accelerate’ mode - he got close to 100mph according to reports, so presumably the accelerator pedal was out of order as well.

I don’t know how come he didn’t or couldn’t take it out of drive to neutral though unless that wasn’t working either.
 
It says he did use the hard shoulder at times. No brake at all is freaky but it also seems to have been stuck in ‘accelerate’ mode - he got close to 100mph according to reports, so presumably the accelerator pedal was out of order as well.

I don’t know how come he didn’t or couldn’t take it out of drive to neutral though unless that wasn’t working either.
There is no shoulder between juncs 11 and 12 and you would be lucky to get up to 40mph on that stretch on a Wednesday afternoon, let alone 100mph.

It's a pity he couldn't have got it in here;
 

Attachments

  • M62.png
    M62.png
    1.8 MB · Views: 23
There is no shoulder between juncs 11 and 12 and you would be lucky to get up to 40mph on that stretch on a Wednesday afternoon, let alone 100mph.

It's a pity he couldn't have got it in here;
That’s where it was finally stopped according to reports but it’d been going on a while leading up to it.

He’d used the hard shoulder & was told to by the police when he phoned them.
 
I remember similar issues with non electric cars from some time ago (2000s?) where the accelerator pedal became stuck. Think there were some lawsuits. I was wondering the same about changing down; going into neutral, at the time. The only answer I ever got from anyone was that you'd wreck the engine - well, yes but given the circumstances. :dunno:
 
Back
Top