Out Of Place Animals

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Fla. Man Finds 6-Foot African Rock Python In Toilet

POSTED: 7:22 am EST February 24, 2005
UPDATED: 11:20 am EST February 24, 2005

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- A St. Petersburg man received a rude awakening Tuesday when he lifted the lid on his toilet and found a snake curled inside, with its head sticking out of the bowl.

With the help of his wife, Shannon Scavotto caught the snake using an improvised noose and put it in a pillowcase.

The reptile was confirmed to be a 6-foot African rock python. Experts said the serpent is just a baby, as African rock pythons get as big as 20 feet long or longer.

Scavotto called his boss to tell him he'd be late because he'd had to wrestle a snake out of his toilet. His boss joked he would need a better excuse than that.

Scavotto told the boss he'd bring it in so he could see it. So he did.

One of Scavotto's co-workers called a friend who raises snakes. The friend said she would come and get it and try to rehabilitate it.

The Scavottos are placing an ad in the paper for anyone who may have lost the snake.

Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
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oll_lewis

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Talking of snakes (it's not so much the rareity of the snake but it's not a native snake and seams to have mostly survived the extremly cold weather until it joined the choir invisible)

Girl finds snake in club jukebox
A two-and-a-half feet long boa constrictor has been found by a teenage girl in a south Wales club jukebox.
RSPCA officers were called to the Premier Club in Cwm, near Ebbw Vale, after the discovery by the 13-year-old daughter of the bar manager.

Stacey Caldwell screamed when she put her hand into the return coin slot and touched the dead reptile.

The RSPCA said it was unclear if the snake had died in the juke box or if it had died and then been left as a joke.


She touched something and screamed - we looked and there was a snake lying there
Jane Caldwell

The snake was found on Thursday night, and Stacey's mother Jane Caldwell said on Friday: "She was looking to see if there was any money in the coin tray.

"She touched something and screamed - we looked and there was a snake lying there.

"She was very shaken and went white. She was really frightened.

"We called the police and they put a table up against the jukebox, but the customers wouldn't go anywhere near it all night.

"The snake was left there overnight until the RSPCA could come and get it this morning.

"We didn't know if it was dead but it wasn't moving.

"Someone must have put it there as a joke, but this was a cruel and stupid joke."


They are not venomous, but they are constrictors and I wouldn't have liked to have put my hand in the juke box and found it
RSPCA officer Keith Hogben

The snake was pronounced dead by a vet on Friday.

RSPCA animal collection officer Keith Hogben, who was called out, said: "We've identified the snake as a common boa constrictor.

"It was in good condition with no external injuries, so we aren't sure how it died.

"We don't know if it escaped and crawled into the jukebox or it has died and someone's put it there as a joke, which isn't funny."

Boa constrictors of this type are native to the rivers and forests of south and central America.

They kill their prey through asphyxiation and a fully-grown adult can be more than 9ft long.

This snake was about two or three years old. Mr Hogben said they were commonly imported to the UK as pets, but took a lot of care to keep at home.

He said: "They are not venomous, but they are constrictors and I wouldn't have liked to have put my hand in the juke box and found it.

"It must have been a shock to the girl.

"The snakes are quite cheap to buy, but you find that they take special care and equipment - we advise people to look into it properly before taking one on."

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/w ... 318349.stm

Published: 2005/03/04 12:56:47 GMT

© BBC MMV
 

Timble2

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I wonder if this was accidental or whether they did it on porpoise...

Porpoises make river appearance
Two porpoises have swum several miles inland up the River Dee in north Wales.
Spectators including children from two nearby schools turned up to see the mammals at Queensferry.


Experts believe the porpoises chased a shoal of fish up the Dee and will later return to their natural habitat in the open sea.

Porpoises are commonly found off the north Wales coast and in the Irish Sea, but it is unusual for the creatures to swim inland or into fresh water.

RSPCA officer William Galvin said that one of the porpoises was female and around four to five feet long, while the second was juvenile and two to three feet long.

He said they were feeding in the Dee and that it was unusual for them to be so far up the estuary.

He added they are more commonly seen in open sea off the north Wales coast.

John Goold, of the University of Wales Bangor's School of Biological Sciences and an expert in marine mammals, said there would be concern if the porpoise stayed away from the ocean for too long.

He added: "It's unusual for us to see them up the estuary although they are a coastal species.

"Why they are there is the 64,000 dollar question.

"It's possible they shot up there chasing a shoal of fish, but it's also possible they are sick.

"They are not designed for fresh water, so if they stay there, there is something wrong."

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/wales/4354563.stm

Published: 2005/03/16 14:08:29 GMT

© BBC MMV
 
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:cry:

Wolf found dead at Chain O'Lakes State Park
March 1, 2005 — State biologists are trying to figure out how a young male timber wolf ended up dead at Chain O' Lakes State Park in far northern Illinois.
Biologist Richard Semel says the wolf ended up as roadkill. But he's preserving the carcass so D-N-A tests can be done to positively identify the species. Semel says tests also should show what wolf pack it came from, although he says he's pretty sure it came down from Wisconsin.

The 89-pound animal was found dead on February 17th. It's only the second wolf confirmed to have been in Illinois since the 1900s.

(Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


Link:http://abclocal.go.com/wls/news/030105_ap_ns_wolf.html
 
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River_Styx said:
Werewolf?
Couldn't be, they always change back to their human form when they die.

This poor guy was hit by a truck they figure. Someone reported it to the rangers, possibly the person who accidently hit it.
 

Bullseye

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Timble said:
I wonder if this was accidental or whether they did it on porpoise...

Porpoises make river appearance
Two porpoises have swum several miles inland up the River Dee in north Wales.
Spectators including children from two nearby schools turned up to see the mammals at Queensferry.


Experts believe the porpoises chased a shoal of fish up the Dee and will later return to their natural habitat in the open sea.

Porpoises are commonly found off the north Wales coast and in the Irish Sea, but it is unusual for the creatures to swim inland or into fresh water.

RSPCA officer William Galvin said that one of the porpoises was female and around four to five feet long, while the second was juvenile and two to three feet long.

He said they were feeding in the Dee and that it was unusual for them to be so far up the estuary.

He added they are more commonly seen in open sea off the north Wales coast.

John Goold, of the University of Wales Bangor's School of Biological Sciences and an expert in marine mammals, said there would be concern if the porpoise stayed away from the ocean for too long.

He added: "It's unusual for us to see them up the estuary although they are a coastal species.

"Why they are there is the 64,000 dollar question.

"It's possible they shot up there chasing a shoal of fish, but it's also possible they are sick.

"They are not designed for fresh water, so if they stay there, there is something wrong."

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/wales/4354563.stm

Published: 2005/03/16 14:08:29 GMT

© BBC MMV

Vey odd as this time of year there would only be eels and flounders in an estuary,no real shoaling fish like mullet or bass that are summer fish.
 

lopaka

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I think this sort-of fits here. There's a new documentary film here in the sates called The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill that doesn't seem to be too much about alien species, per se, but might be of interest to some of you. It's gotten generally favorable reviews.

In her warm, welcoming, and eminently watchable film, Judy Irving follows a wild flock of cherry-headed conures through San Francisco. Her guide is Mark Bittner, a carefree musician who has made it his job to look after the startling parrots when he’s not reading Beat poetry. Bittner gives the birds names and a place to recuperate when they’re sick; he keeps journals about their personalities and idiosyncrasies. In any other city, Bittner would be considered a work-shy eccentric, but in San Francisco, he has a home and a passion.

Like Bittner, the movie quietly convinces us that these birds are worth paying attention to. With a natural storyteller’s ease, Irving teases several narrative strands out of her material: Bittner’s landlords are planning changes, the city and the press take an interest in the flock, and hawks fly overhead, threatening the parrots. Bittner tells (and shows) the stories of individual birds: the tragic love story of Sophie and Picasso, Mingus, who prefers the indoors, and his favorite Connor, the temperamental blue-headed outsider.

Bittner’s charm, Irving’s good humor, and the endlessly fascinating and beautiful birds make sure that “Wild Parrots” amply repays our attention. It is a loving portrait of a displaced flock of birds, a fascinating city, and a unique man.
http://worldfilm.about.com/od/documenta ... arrots.htm
 

Mighty_Emperor

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Bizarre Species Sightings Leave Floridians Perplexed

POSTED: 6:15 am EST March 31, 2005

ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. -- Something strange is stirring in and around local waters.

In the last few months, fish and bird species have been popping up in places they're not normally found. These transients aren't arriving in huge numbers, just an oddity here and there -- an Arctic bird off St. Augustine Beach, an armored catfish normally in South America found in the Indian River Lagoon, spiny dogfish normally farther north found in Ponce de Leon Inlet.

"Something's going on in the North Atlantic," said Chuck Hunter, an Atlanta-based refuge biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

But there isn't one explanation to account for the unusual sightings, bird and fish experts say. Some attribute them to the hurricanes while others point the finger at a cold-water phenomenon that started in 2003.

For the last few weeks at the Flagler Beach Pier, small hake fish have been jumping onto people's hooks. Identified as southern hake, the coldwater fish are common in Floridian estuaries, although not usually close to the shoreline, said Ed Matheson of the state's Fish and Wildlife Research Institute in St. Petersburg.

Bill Allgire, who works at Ocean Pier Bait & Tackle, says the fish, about 3 inches long, have been coming in mostly after dark. Some days, he'll see one small school of them; other days, they can be seen throughout the full length of the pier, he said.

"Nobody really wants them," he said. "They're just there."

Rich Paperno, research administrator with the Fish and Wildlife Institute, says it's still too early to tell how the hurricanes impacted wildlife.

"We've seen a lot of unusual things after the hurricanes, where the fresh water that was running off brought a lot of species that were running into the lagoons," Paperno said from the Indian River field laboratory.

Soon after last year's hurricanes, Paperno said, armored catfish normally found in South America were found in the Indian River lagoon.

Some have caught spiny dogfish -- a type of shark that's usually found north of Cape Cod in the winter -- swimming in Ponce Inlet and the Jacksonville area, said Eric Sander, who does recreational fishing surveys for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

Of Sander's 16 years of shark fishing, he said he has never caught a single spiny dogfish. Sander connects their arrival with cold-water temperatures reaching the low 50s. The chilly waters can be prompted by upwellings, a situation when persistent winds out of the south and southeast blow warm surface water out to sea.

But whatever caused these out-of-towners to visit, it's left some fishermen scratching their heads.

As for the one Arctic bird found in St. Augustine and the others reported in South Carolina, researchers are dumbfounded.

In December, a puffin was found off St. Augustine Beach and stayed alive for only 24 hours at a local wildlife rescue and rehabilitation center. It was the second puffin ever to be reported in Florida, said Andy Kratter, collections manager at the Florida Museum of Natural History.

"He was very thin, emaciated really," said Karen Lynch, president of Noah's Ark Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation in St. Augustine.

Kratter, who examined the remains of the puffin, said neither the hurricanes nor the cold water had anything to do with the puffin's unusual pilgrimage.

"Probably it just kept going, instead of stopping where it should have," Kratter said. "It went too far south. It could have been a storm. Its orientation was screwed up for some reason."

And while experts agree rare bird sightings are not uncommon in Florida, Kratter said, "it's still pretty much a mystery why birds get off tracking," although food or weather can be common factors.

Sometimes, butterfly fish, who live in Florida, find their way to New Jersey estuaries, Matheson said.

"These are babies that get caught in the Gulf Stream and go up there," Matheson said.

He speculated that the southern hake spotted at the Flagler Beach Pier were probably the scattered young also. When a coldwater upwelling occurs, the water brings in cooler water fish, Matheson said.

And if last summer's hurricanes have anything to do with the bizarre sightings, researchers say it'll take time to figure that out.

"Many of the effects are going to be long-term effects," Paperno said. "We won't (understand) this for several years down the road."


----------------------
Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press.
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lopaka

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Mr. R.I.N.G. said:
What's with the escaping kangaroos?

Wis. Officials Capture Wandering Kangaroo

DODGEVILLE, Wis. - A kangaroo that went on a walkabout in frigid Wisconsin was captured Wednesday. But where the marsupial came from remained a mystery. Sheriff's deputies cornered the 150-pound kangaroo in a barn after receiving calls for days from shocked residents who had seen it.
http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20050106/ap_on_re_us/brf_escaped_kangaroo

Just as a small follow-up to that story from January, they never did end up finding the owner, which maybe isn't so strange, but I love that (apparently) either there are these other, different, missing kangaroos running around or there are people who falsely confess to marsupial-related mysteries.

ANIMAL NEWS
Wisconsin's Mystery Kangaroo
February 28

Wisconsin's Mystery Kangaroo

Authorities in southern Wisconsin have discovered that capturing a kangaroo in a snowstorm isn't the hard part. It's finding out where the animal came from.

Authorities recently gave up their hunt for the owner of a red 130-pound marsupial, saying its origin will remain a mystery.

The Iowa County Sheriff's Office has given the Henry Vilas Zoo in Madison permission to keep the kangaroo, nicknamed Roo. The animal has been in quarantine at the zoo since its capture early January.

Sheriff's deputies corralled the male kangaroo in a barn after receiving calls from shocked residents who had seen it hopping through rural parts of Dodgeville for two days.

"We're almost two months out since the incident occurred. I would imagine that the owner is not coming forward," Iowa County Sheriff Steve Michek said.

Michek said deputies ruled out several claims of ownership, including one from a Connecticut woman who said her kangaroo was missing. An Appleton, Wis., man also claimed he had lost a kangaroo in September, but his description did not match that of the animal.

Zoo officials plan to introduce the marsupial, which has been deemed healthy, to their other five kangaroos this spring when the weather warms up.

(AP)
http://koit.com/new_fall/animal_news.cfm?id=9168
 

lopaka

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:)

.
New Jersey has whale of a time with an unusual visitor
Hundreds gather to see beluga

Wednesday, April 13, 2005 Posted: 12:58 PM EDT (1658 GMT)


TRENTON, New Jersey (AP) -- A young beluga whale that apparently took a wrong turn and wound up in the Delaware River, 80 miles from the open sea, appeared to be making its way back downstream on Wednesday.

State officials said the 10- to 12-foot white whale was spotted near Beverly, about eight miles south of the point where it was first spotted around noon Tuesday at Trenton, where it drew hundreds of camera-toting spectators.

State police and environmental officials said they hoped the whale would find its own way back south to open water, and were keeping boaters away.

"Our enemy here is too much attention," said state police Trooper Stephen Jones. "We want the whale to get his bearings and continue south without interference from too many curious onlookers."

The whale was spotted Tuesday downstream from the city's "Trenton Makes The World Takes" bridge, which spans the river at the upper end of its tidal pool. Upstream from that point, the river is too shallow for an animal that big.

It spent much of Tuesday swimming in a loop between the bridge and a marina about a mile downstream.

"Four news helicopters are hovering overhead. The train is stopping on the train trestle, people are lining up along the river. It's like the city has gone mad," said Paul Loriquet, a spokesman for the state attorney general's office who watched the scene from his office.

Bob Schoelkopf, director of the Marine Mammal Stranding Center in Brigantine, said the whale might be a juvenile that couldn't fend for itself in the open ocean or an adult that chased a school of herring up the river past Philadelphia. Typically, beluga whales travel in large groups but spread out when feeding.

A right whale -- named Waldo the Wrong-Way Right Whale by Philadelphians -- straggled into the Delaware River in 1995. The whale beached itself at an oil terminal in Pennsauken, New Jersey, but disappeared after about 10 days. It was found two years later swimming near Canada.

Copyright 2005 The Associated Press.
http://www.cnn.com/2005/US/04/13/nj.whale.ap/index.html
 

rynner2

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A young beluga whale that apparently took a wrong turn and wound up in the Delaware River, 80 miles from the open sea, appeared to be making its way back downstream on Wednesday.
Further south than belugas are supposed to be, I think (but the Labrador Current may have something to do with it...)

For my White Whale sighting, see here.

(That was an isolated thread, now subsumed into Albino Animals - but, if it was a beluga I saw, wrongly subsumed, as belugas are white, but not albinos!)
 

lopaka

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Where the buffalo roam -- a tennis court?

Tuesday, April 26, 2005 Posted: 12:15 PM EDT (1615 GMT)

PIKESVILLE, Maryland (AP) -- A herd of buffalo somehow got loose and wandered around an upscale neighborhood Tuesday, disrupting traffic and alarming homeowners before officers managed to corral them in a tennis court.

More than a dozen police cars and a police helicopter were used to herd the roughly 10 beasts, authorities said.

"Somehow they figured it out; I've got to give a lot of credit to the creativity of our officers," police spokesman Shawn Vinson said.

Authorities have identified the owner of the buffalo but did not release the person's name immediately.

Residents in the Baltimore suburb first reported that buffalo were meandering along the road about 7 a.m.

Police shut down several major traffic arteries, including a section of the Baltimore Beltway, while they tried to anticipate which way the buffalo would roam.

Officers eventually managed to maneuver the buffalo onto the tennis court about a mile from where they first were spotted. After that, they began herding them aboard a livestock truck.

Copyright 2005 The Associated Press.
http://www.cnn.com/2005/US/04/26/roamin ... index.html[/quote]
 

Leaferne

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Sea Lion Trapped in Power Plant Intake Tank

The Associated Press
Wednesday, April 27, 2005; 12:07 AM

LOS ANGELES -- A 300-pound sea lion has been living in a water intake tank at a power plant, dodging rescue attempts since last week, officials said Tuesday.

The male sea lion squeezed through an opening of the tank at the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's plant in Playa del Rey and became trapped April 18, said spokeswoman Darlene Battle.

"He's pretty comfortable" and able to feed on shrimp and fish in the tank, she said. "I was talking to the plant manager who says he's ... not anxious to leave."

Water in the 60-foot by 30-foot tank is used to cool the plant's generators.

Battle said DWP enlisted the help of the Whale Rescue Team, a nonprofit marine animal group. Team members lowered a boat containing a cargo net into the tank, but the sea lion has avoided the net that crews hoped to use to lift the animal.

Television images from KABC-TV showed the mammal lying peacefully on the boat -- just inches from the net.

"He's on the boat but he won't get on the net. What we're waiting for now is for him to roll on the cargo net so we can get him out to sea," Battle said.

DWP provides water and electricity to about 3.8 million residents and businesses in Los Angeles.
Source

Saw him on the news this morning--he looked pretty content. :)
 
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Wolverines in the UK??

http://icnewcastle.icnetwork.co.uk/sund ... _page.html


New suspect in savage Killings Apr 17 2005

By Phil Doherty

One of the most ferocious animals in the world could be at large in the North, a wildlife expert has warned.

Eddie Bell, an animal liaison officer with Durham police, believes a wolverine could be responsible for a spate of savage attacks on lambs.

Farmer Andrew Spence, of Iverston in County Durham, has lost a dozen lambs in as many days to a mystery predator.

The lambs were all savaged and some had their heads ripped off.

At first Mr Spence thought they could have been victims of the so- called Durham Puma said to roam the region.

feared

Mr Bell, however, reckons the killing method used suggests it was not a big cat that was responsible but a wolverine, a creature feared by hunters the world over.

The police sergeant said: "We have had big cat sightings at Iverston, but cats never kill two prey at the same time and pumas certainly don't leave their prey just lying there. They always carry them off.

"We have evidence that wolverines are loose in this country. A few years ago the National Farmers' Union was advising farmers in Wales that there were at least two wolverines in the area and about five years ago Northumbria Police came to me about some dead lambs with big bitemarks on top of their heads.

"We reckon it could have been a wolverine.

"Wolverines are fearless and ferocious and will drive a grizzly bear off a kill. I'd advise anyone coming across one of these creatures to back off and get away as soon as possible."

Wolverines, a member of the stoat family, are native to North America.

They grow to about 3ft or 4ft long and are stocky and powerfully built.They are so ferocious that animals such as bears, pumas and wolves avoid fighting them.

Other animals Mr Bell believes could have been responsible for the attacks on Mr Spence's lambs include a large rogue dog or even a boar. Mr Spence said: "We have been putting our lambs out to grass for the last 10 days and three of those we've lost have been found with their heads torn off.

"These were big strong lambs, so it's not a fox or badger doing this. Whatever did it was powerful enough to crack their rib cages as if they were twigs. Also, the bite-marks are much bigger than you find with badger or fox attacks.

"My stockman, who has many years' experience, is completely baffled at the way these lambs have been killed. He says he hasn't seen anything like it.

"My children usually play around the farmbut I've told them not to go too far because I'm worried."
 

Jerry_B

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Apparently two were spotted in Somerset about 10 years ago, IIRC.
 
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Anonymous

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Also one was shot in wales, and the Welsh National Farmers union apparently released a report stating at least two Wolverines were living wild in the country.
 

CygnusRex

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IS IT A MONSTER? NO IT'S A MYSTERY MARSUPIAL
15:00 - 03 May 2005

Residents in Sundridge and Brasted are concerned that an escaped wallaby on the loose in the villages could cause a road accident.

Jane Belle, of Church Road, which runs between the two villages, was startled to discover the exotic animal in her garden on the morning of April 22.

She said: "It was jumping up and down and it looked at me through the kitchen window.

"It had quite round ears like a kangaroo and before we could take a photo, it jumped up and ran away at a great lick.

"It could have caused a horrible accident in the road."

There have been numerous sightings of the mystery marsupial in villagers' gardens.

It has been confirmed that the wallaby is owned privately by Phil Dobbington of Safari Gardens and Pets, at Main Road, Sundridge.

Mr Dobbington stated on the day of the sighting that the animal would be caught, but days later, staff members from the pet shop revealed that the wallaby was still on the loose.

RSPCA spokesman Klare Kennett confirmed the charity had received reports of the runaway wallaby.

She added that she had contacted Mr Dobbington to inform him of its whereabouts.
>Source<
 

lopaka

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Monkey Escapes From S.C. Island Labratory

The Associated Press
Friday, May 6, 2005; 6:14 PM

BEAUFORT, S.C. -- An escapee from Morgan Island has been captured in a tree in the backyard of a home on Lady's Island _ about 7 miles away from where he was supposed to be.

The 10-year-old, 20-pound male rhesus monkey was first noticed as missing from the island April 30, the same time residents of Coosaw and Lady's islands reported seeing him. Some residents were concerned the animal might carry an infectious disease because Morgan Island houses primates used in government research.

Alpha Genesis officials said they can't explain how the monkey managed to leave the island laboratory and make its way across Parrot Creek.

"I have been here eight years and this is the first (escape) I can remember in the area," said Greg Westergaard, president and chief executive officer of Alpha Genesis. "I'm at a loss at how it got over there. They probably can swim a little bit, but it really is a long way over there."


The monkeys have been on the island since 1979 and are the property of the Food and Drug Administration. They are used in defense and vaccine development studies.

The escaped monkey was caught Tuesday, Westergaard said. "I'm sure he wanted to get back but couldn't figure out how," he said.

But the escapee won't be going back to the 400-acres colony on Morgan Island. Instead, he'll probably be taken to one of two breeding facilities in Yemassee or Early Branch, Westergaard said.

Westergaard said it was unlikely the monkey would have a disease because the research performed on the animals isn't done at the island. The monkeys also go through physical examinations four times a year to make sure they are healthy and carry no diseases, he said.

"This monkey's in great shape," he said.

He said there are no artificial barriers keeping the monkeys on the island other than the water surrounding it, as they tend to be social creatures and stay with other monkeys.

"I don't know what happened to this guy," Westergaard said.

___

Information from: The Beaufort Gazette, http://www.beaufortgazette.com

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/co ... 01148.html
 

oll_lewis

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(100m deap not 100m from the cornish coast as the headline says)

Deep-sea crab found 100m offshore

A rare crab, usually found in depths of up to 9,840ft (3,000m), has been caught in the nets of a Cornish fisherman.
The giant box crab was brought to the surface by skipper John Walsh as he fished 75 miles (121km) west of Padstow at a depth of just 328ft (100m).

Staff at Blue Reef Aquarium, where the deep-sea crab is on display, believe it is Britain's largest crab species reaching lengths of up to 6ft (2m).

It is thought to be only the seventh recorded specimen in the UK since 1900.

'From another planet'

Few have survived the huge changes in pressure as they are hauled to the surface and a spokeswoman for the aquarium said they fear this crab may not live for long.

But she said at the moment it appears to be in good health and is recovering in a specially chilled tank at the aquarium in Newquay.

The crab, which has a claw span of 120cm, was kept alive on the boat for three days before arriving back at Padstow.

Aquarist Matt Slater said: "It looks like something from another planet and has caused quite a stir among all the staff here.

"It's one of the oddest crabs I've ever seen. It has weird eyes on stalks which look like bicycle handlebars and a strange pair of backwards facing pincers."

The crab has now been formally identified with the help of a local zoologist, Dr Paul Gainey.

Mr Slater said: "Apparently it is normally found very deep on the edge of the continental shelf which runs from Morocco to Ireland at depths of 3,000 metres."

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/e ... 536255.stm

Published: 2005/05/11 11:47:31 GMT

© BBC MMV
 

Melf

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looks like a spider crab to me
 

borubryan

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http://www.gazetteextra.com/urbanbear042705.asp


Black bear captured in Milwaukee suburb

(Published Wednesday, April 27, 2005 04:09:52 PM CDT)

Associated Press

WAUWATOSA, Wis. - A black bear spotted wandering around a business in this western Milwaukee suburb was captured Wednesday morning after being shot with a tranquilizer dart and scampering up a tree.

Officers found the 180-pound male bear under a semitrailer after getting reports about it around 6:30 a.m., Police Chief Barry Weber said.

The bear was shot with a tranquilizer but was able to climb up a nearby tree before eventually feeling the effects of the tranquilizer and falling down, Weber said. It became caught in a lower branch and then was lowered into a net.

Neil Tomkowiak got a good look at the bear when she climbed up to the break room window at Schwaab Stamp & Seal.

"I spilled my coffee all over myself," Tomkowiak said.

State wildlife officials took the bear to the Milwaukee County Zoo so veterinarians could check it and then headed to a state wildlife area in northeastern Wisconsin to release it.

Jim McNelly, a wildlife program supervisor for the Department of Natural Resources, said the bear was probably trying to find some land unoccupied by other bears that he could claim.

"This one took it a little bit to the extreme," he said.

Wildlife officials received recent reports of a bear sighting in Calumet and Manitowoc counties and then two days ago in Cedarburg, north of Milwaukee. McNelly said it's likely the bear found in Wauwatosa was the same one see farther north.

The DNR has received reports of bears as far south as Green Bay and Middleton but never one in southeastern Wisconsin in recent history, McNelly said. Wisconsin has about 11,000 to 12,000 bears, mostly in the northern two-thirds of the state.

Weber said he would have been more concerned if the animal had wandered into a more populated area of the community.

Wildlife officials quickly ruled out the bear was from the Milwaukee County Zoo, located near where the bear was captured, said Laura Pedriani, the zoo's public affairs and services director.

"The sheriff's department called. Our night keeper took a count of our bears and all were accounted for," she said.
 

Bullseye

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Re, wallabies.There ARE wallabies seen in the UK,there have also,maybe still are colonies of them living wild,however theres an awful lot of people that don't really know what our native wildlife looks like.A large hare could (by the inexpirienced) be "confused" with a wallaby,have seen some very large hares so I know how big they get,BIG.!.
(Chap I know swore he saw a penguin on the beach once,'twas a guilimot,very common but not normally seen on the beach) :roll:
 

Human_84

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....grandfather (who was a farmer) used to drown trespassing racoons. Well, anyways he put them underwater obviously. Thats an out of place animal right? Does that fit here?
 

oll_lewis

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An out of place animal is an animal thats in an environment or country where it is not officialy ment to be (in the wild, not in a zoo or cage or whatever).

For example if a lemur was spotted leaping from tree to tree in a Cardiff park this would be an out of place animal, as Wales is very far from the lemur's natural home of Madagasgar and the environment is very different.
 
A

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So does it count if we knew where they came from or how they got there? If so Tampa and the Ocala National Forest have well established monkey populations due to Busch Gardens and Silver Springs.
 

lopaka

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A bear swimming in a suburban LA pool makes for great video, I gotta say. :D

Bear Returned to Mountains After Taking Dip in Pool

SURPRISE VISITOR

PORTER RANCH (CNS) — An overheated bear, or perhaps a bear in heat, was back home in the mountains today after ambling through a Porter Ranch neighborhood and taking a dip in a homeowner's pool, authorities said.

A resident called 911 about 6:30 p.m. yesterday to report that the bear was in the backyard of a home in the 17800 block of Orna Drive, said Brian Humphrey of the Los Angeles Fire Department.

Los Angeles Animal Services and state Fish and Game Department personnel were dispatched to figure out how to get the beast back into the wild.

No injuries were reported, although the bear attracted curious neighbors.

The homeowner said her children were in the pool when the bear arrived. "We were in the swimming pool, my kids were swimming, I was by it," homeowner Maryam Salahael said. "My dog began barking very loudly. I went to see what's going on. I see a bear in my backyard."

She said she got her children inside and called 911.

"I think he was looking for water," Capt. John Mitchell of the Los Angeles Fire Department said. "When we got here he seemed very hot, very tired, was panting heavily. I really think he was looking for water, and he found it."

However, a Fish and Game official said the 140-pound black bear was a female and may have been looking for love, in the wrong place.

"It's a female bear, it looks like it's possibly in heat," said Cindy Wood of the state Department of Fish and Game. "She probably just made a wrong turn and ended up in a neighborhood. She belongs up in the hills, and that's where she lives."

Fish and Game personnel shot the bear with a tranquilizer gun, causing it to fall asleep by the pool, said Humphrey.

"She was tranquilized," Wood said. "She walked around, she actually did fall into the pool. She had a noose put around her and she was pulled from the pool by my partner and they held her until the drug took effect."

Earlier, residents said the bear knocked on doors and windows as she crossed several streets and climbed a wall before finding her way into the backyard, where she took several swims and walked around for a couple of hours.

The bear, an older adult, did not appear agitated or aggressive and was in good health, authorities said.


The bear was released in the Santa Susanna Mountains, Wood said. "I'm glad it turned out OK," neighbor Diana Spencer said. "I'm happy they are going to take it back up to its home and let it live out its life, and hopefully never come down here again."

Copyright © 2005 KABC-TV and the Associated Press.
http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/news/052305 ... _bear.html
 

oll_lewis

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shonda said:
So does it count if we knew where they came from or how they got there? If so Tampa and the Ocala National Forest have well established monkey populations due to Busch Gardens and Silver Springs.
yes, it certinly dose, so long as the animal is out of it's natural area. It might not be as spectacular as, say, a rino being spotted in Cardiff central station when no british zoo's, circuses, safari parks and private colectors claim responcibility but it's certinly interesting to read about escaped zoo monkeys surviving in the wild. Some people would say that out of place animals are not 'fortean enougth', but in some cases it can provide explanations or theorys to explan cryptids or monster myths, or could be genuine mysteries in themselves like for example the pervasion of alien big cats in the UK of which them being OOPA is only one possible explanation.
 

TheQuixote

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Alaskan awakens to find bear in trailer
Associated Press — March 28, 2005
JUNEAU, Alaska — Florentino Acosta has seen plenty of black bears around his Juneau neighborhood but never inside his trailer home — until now.

Acosta woke up in the living room as the bear was breaking in. Acosta had fallen asleep while watching television.


His son, Paul, was shouting, and the only thing standing between him and the bear was a wooden door that the animal soon forced open.

Paul Acosta said the bear was inside for 30 to 45 minutes Thursday night before it left. Most of the time it was moving between the two ends of the living room, where Acosta family members were chasing it back and forth.

The bear got out of the trailer a couple of minutes before police arrived. Florentino Acosta said he didn't call the police right away because he lost track of the telephone in the excitement.

The bear probably weighed 500 to 600 pounds, he said, although his son said it wasn't that big.

No one was hurt. Florentino Acosta said the bear raised some blood pressure but that he was lucky his son woke him up.

Laurie Dubish, who lives about four trailers away, said she heard the son calling for help around midnight.

Bears, she said, "were in my yard last summer. I wouldn't let my kids out."

Acosta has also seen his share of bears. At the back of the Switzer Village mobile park, there is only a creek between his property and the woods.

Acosta said he believes the break-in bear could return. It's only the beginning of spring, and the bears aren't long out of hibernation.

Police said the incident at the trailer was the second call of a reported bear sighting in the area this spring. Capt. Tom Porter said garbage didn't attract the bear to the trailer.

Acosta said the garbage was inside, secured and not touched. The only thing he could figure is that the family had fried fish for dinner and the smell must have lingered.
and from the same site:

Bear takes dip in suburban L.A. pool
Associated Press — May 24, 2005
LOS ANGELES — A 140-pound bear wandered into a suburban neighborhood and took a dip in a swimming pool before being tranquilized and returned to the wild.

The female bear ambled into the San Fernando Valley's Porter Ranch area shortly after 6 p.m. Sunday, bumping into doors and windows before taking a few splashes in a backyard pool, fire spokesman Brian Humphrey said.

Homeowner Maryam Salahael pulled her children out of the pool when the bear showed up, and she called 911.

"My dog began barking very loudly. I went to see what's going on. I see a bear in my backyard," Salahael told KTTV-TV.

Authorities cordoned off the area as wildlife officials tranquilized the bear, said Cindy Wood of the California Department of Fish and Game. The animal was then released into the Santa Susana Mountains.

"It looks like it's possibly in heat," Wood said. "She probably just made a wrong turn and ended up in a neighborhood. She belongs up in the hills and that's where she lives."
Source
 
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