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The Deltic story in Herbert's book always seemed a bit fanciful and I read recently that it was written as a seasonal tale for an enthusiasts club (possibly a Deltic society, I forget) but was published as the real thing even though the parties involved wrote to the author telling him it was fictional.

Railway Ghosts and Phantoms is an interesting read but a mixed bag. There are stories that read like first hand accounts, some that have a grain of truth but are heavily embroidered and others that sound like pure hokum. I reckon railways and the supernatural have yet to receive the literature they deserve.
For a folklorists account with some ghostly aspects, Paul Smeeton's 'Crossing the Line, Trespassing on Railway Weirdness' has much to commend it.

edit: the Deltic story's true provenance is in Smeeton p28-29
 
Ronnor said:
As for the Hatfield/Great Heck connection - it was the same class 91 involved rather than the same DVT. It's not a particularly spectacular coincidence when you consider the class comprises of only 31 engines. The loco was 91023, and was indeed renumbered to 91132 which seems to have ended its run of bad luck. .

My apologies, Freight's my thing, and then only as a career rather than a hobby. Dunno much about the ones that carry more than 2 people!
I do still think it's freaky though. Even if there aren't that many in the fleet, to have the same one in 2 major accidents still has to be a bit :shock:

Cavynaut, I asked a colleague the other day about the 37 and he confirmed that it was supposed to be haunted and told me the story, but had no experiences himself.
I used to regularly get that loco and have never had anything weird happen. As I said before, I feel cheated :(
 
blacktractor said:
I do still think it's freaky though. Even if there aren't that many in the fleet, to have the same one in 2 major accidents still has to be a bit :shock:

Apparently the same loco was involved in the Sandy derailment of 1998. :shock:
 
Hi everyone,

Great thread! As someone with a long-time interest in both the railways and in ghosts it ticks all the boxes for me!

About ten or fifteen years ago I got a book out of my (then) local library which was concerned with railway ghosts. It was a very good read, but unfortunately I can't recall who it was by, or it's title (beyond the fact that it was called something like: "Ghosts of Britain's Railways", "Railway Ghosts", or something). The story that has particularly stuck in my mind concerned the haunting of High Wycombe railway station - as I lived in High Wycombe at that time and used the statioin daily.

Has anyone seen this story in a railway/ghost book, and if you have could you consider posting the name of the book and it's author here, as I would dearly love to track down a copy via Amazon, etc?

Thanks in advance.

CAL.
 
CALGACUS03 said:
Has anyone seen this story in a railway/ghost book, and if you have could you consider posting the name of the book and it's author here, as I would dearly love to track down a copy via Amazon, etc?

Thanks in advance.

CAL.

It's called 'Railway Ghosts and Phantoms' by W B Herbert, Guild Publishing. Preserved railways are your best bet for a bargain copy, there's often one knocking about in the second hand book areas.
 
It's called 'Railway Ghosts and Phantoms' by W B Herbert, Guild Publishing. Preserved railways are your best bet for a bargain copy, there's often one knocking about in the second hand book areas.

Thanks for that colpepper1.

I'll try to hunt that one out. If I remember correctly it was a very interesting and informative read on the subject.
 
...Great story Ronnor. Somewhat reminiscent, at least in atmosphere, of the one I provided a (now broken) link to way back at the start of this thread: remote sidings, Peak District, shuffling footsteps, stick man - I'll have to see if I can find the original.

Thanks to zufus I've managed to rediscover the original IHTM, which I thought had been lost forever. Here it is.

I'm not exactly sure how stable that source is, so I'm going to cut and paste the original in full...
 
TRAINYARD GHOST?
Mrs Andrea X

This event concerns my husband who works for the railway and does lots of night shifts.

As you can imagine many stories fly around the different yards about railway ghosts, legends and suchlike. Normally he laughs them off but on this night and at this particular location which is situated deep in the middle of the Derbyshire Peak District, he found little to laugh about!

It happened in August this year on a hot soundless night , as where this yard is situated means that it is surrounded by open fields and hills and so no traffic etc. can be heard, especially in the middle of the night.

He had seen to one train, he is a shunter by the way, and was in the cabin awaiting his next train due some half an hour later. The cabin is really just an old wooden shack with a little office and a kitchen area with an old chair and cooker. In fact the yard is so old that the old semiphore signal system is still in operation and I find the whole place spooky even in daylight!

Anyway this night - a Tuesday if I remember,there was a full moon in the sky - known for reasons that shall become clear later, my husband was sat on the chair waiting for the kettle to boil to make a cup of tea. He was sat in the dark, enjoying the peace and quiet. Suddenly he distinctly heard footsteps on the gravel in the yard outside. He could hear someone (or something!!) moving towards the cabin and the cracking sounds of the leaves and twigs as it grew closer. He is the only member of staff on duty at night, save for the drivers who arrive and depart with each train, so knew that he was completely alone.

The footsteps grew louder but seemed to be of a dragging nature as he could hear one foot being dragged behind the other! As I said, this place is so remote up a long dark lane, that no one from the nearby village bothers to go up there - it is private property after all and so it is desolate at night. Normally my husband would go out and confront whoever it was, as at other yards there have been cases of opportunists, out to steal from the standing trains, and he has had to call the police many times before. But for some reason the sound of these footsteps filled him with foreboding.

There is a small window at the side of the cabin and if you are sat in the chair you look directly at it. My husband could see the bright light of the full moon outside and suddenly he saw illuminated by it, as if leaning against the window, a dark inverted V shape ie, an arm bent at the elbow as if somebody was stooping and holding onto their back as they walked, it was also very knobbly - like a twiglet is how Sean described it!! . He could also hear a deep rasping sound like somebody breathing with a bad lung problem!

The elbow moved around the building away from the window and as myhusband looked at the door he realised that it wasn't locked! Instead of jumping up to lock it as he might have done he felt compelled to sit still and so sat stunned as a sharp tapping could be heard on the door itself. Suddenly the doorknob turned about three times - but not enough to open it .

By now my husband was scared stiff and expecting who knows what to enter the cabin, but as suddenly as it appeared it turned on its heel and was gone. The dragging sound and rasping disappeared - but not gradually, just all of a sudden!

He went out to investigate but found, as he expected, that he was alone again! He told me this story with some reluctance as I said he is a real sceptic!!

Incidentally, he regualary sees one particular driver and has to get into the cabin for part of the journey down the line to this yard. Anyway, this particular driver insists on keeping the doors locked - even though he knows that they never see anyone around there! My husband asked him why he kept them firmly bolted but all he asked in reply, was had Sean heard or seen anything strange whilst he had been working at this particular yard. Sean pretended that he didn't know what he meant, to see if he would say more - but he just shrugged and locked the door again!!

He has thankfully seen or heard nothing untoward since but now goes on nights at that particular yard with some trepidation!!

NB. I have changed my husband's name to protect identities, but otherwise this is a full and true account of what happened!
 
I came across this story on a railway enthusiast board that I belong to a couple of nights ago.

Most of the British members of this board will recall the Great Heck crash about three years ago. For those who don't, basically a car driver crashed onto the main East Coast railway line, causing a collision between a goods train and a passenger train. Several people died as a result, including the driver of the goods train. The goods train locomotive was so badly damaged that it was broken up and a replacement locomotive ordered.

Anyway, the upshot of the story is that the company concerned, GB Railfreight, named another of their locomotives after the driver who was so tragically killed.

One of the members of the board I referred to is a driver at the depot (FB, Ferrybridge?, I'm not up on the new codes) at which the dead driver worked, and he happened to mention that he, and the other drivers, have experienced some odd occurences on the locomotive which was named after the deceased driver. Things such as brakes coming on for no good reason, and the engine revving way over what it should do. Apparently it got to a point where the company concerned offered to have the loco blessed by a priest. I find it interesting that these things began to be reported after the locomotive was named in honour of the deceased driver.

As a railway enthusiast of about 35 years standing, I do know of other stories concerning 'bad luck' or 'jinxed' locomotives, and I just wondered if anyone else (principally jima or Escargot, as they both appear to be rail enthusiasts) had heard anything about this or any other case.


Interesting thread, just discovered by me for the first time.

On the matter of “bad luck”, or “jinxed”, locomotives: my favourite bit of agreeable creeping-out, involves the faraway Philippines. The island of Negros in that group, has played host to many “agricultural / industrial” railways: which happened, island-wide, to go on using steam locomotives way into the late 20th century, when steam was in retreat throughout the world – attracting many railway enthusiasts to visit Negros. One such line on this island, was operated by the Insular Lumber Company; its purpose being to bring timber felled up in the hills, down to the coast and the sawmills thereon. The ILC’s railway used throughout its life, assorted curious and interesting US-built steam locos, bigger and smaller. A large one, was its locomotive no. 7: a huge Mallet-type articulated steam loco, built for the ILC in 1925 by the US firm of Baldwin.

This machine was in the latter years of the line’s operation – IIRC late 1970s / early 80s – the one in charge of hauling the large-scale timber trains to the mills. At this time, when foreign railway enthusiasts became acquainted with this venue; the railway’s staff were convinced that no. 7 was a “hoodoo engine” – prone to inexplicably and dangerously malfunctioning: many men were reputed to have been killed in the course of working on her. Without wishing to come across as patronising: what with these guys being mostly Catholic, and not highly sophisticated folk – their drawing the conclusion that no. 7 appeared to be possessed by “something not-good”, perhaps wasn't surprising. (It seems not to be known whether – in parallel to the British situation mentioned in the OP – it was thought of, to call in the local priest to address the matter.) A more common-sense explanation perhaps suggests itself: by the late ‘70s, no. 7 was in dreadfully bad mechanical shape, and had to be operated with great caution – at very low boiler pressure, and moving no faster than a crawl.

The ILC’s railway was abandoned some two-to-three decades ago, and locomotive no. 7 is now on static display as a “monument” in the city of Sagay on Negros, presumably no longer endangering anyone.

Pictures of her (and a great deal of highly-varied other stuff) can (hopefully) be found as below: the loco concerned, is the enormous one – sometimes identifiable by the number 7 -- shown in a couple of pictures hauling, tender-first, a timber train over a timber trestle viaduct.


https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=I...&biw=1280&bih=890&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ8
 
Going down below there are a lot of ghost stories attached to the London Underground. I read a facinating book about it once.

There's also an excellent documentary on the subject, Ghosts On The Underground, available on YouTube.
If you haven't seen that, I can recommend it. :eek:
 
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Seconding about the doc Escargot/Spookdaddy has mentioned.

I regretted first watching it alone in the house with the lights off. No stupid intrusive FX but.....
 
Seconding about the doc Escargot/Spookdaddy has mentioned.

I regretted first watching it alone in the house with the lights off. No stupid intrusive FX but.....

I think it's probably the best documentary of it's type that I've seen; McGanns narration, like the rest of the production, is perfectly pitched and unsensational, this, with the unembellished matter of factness of the storytelling and the solidity of the witnesses makes the stories all the more hair raising. To me, it's perfect viewing. (Oh, and they use Sigur Rós on the soundtrack - perfect music for the spooky stuff.)
 
I think it's probably the best documentary of it's type that I've seen; McGanns narration, like the rest of the production, is perfectly pitched and unsensational, this, with the unembellished matter of factness of the storytelling and the solidity of the witnesses makes the stories all the more hair raising. To me, it's perfect viewing. (Oh, and they use Sigur Rós on the soundtrack - perfect music for the spooky stuff.)

They also used Interpol's "hands away" on the soundtrack too, IIRC so it was spookily perfect all the way around. :)

I do wish there were more documentaries dealing with strange phenomena that matched the quality of that one.
 
They also used Interpol's "hands away" on the soundtrack too, IIRC so it was spookily perfect all the way around...

I'd forgotten that one. Interpol's Untitled is a favourite of mine: chilly sounds, gutrumbling bass, sparse lyrics.

'I will surprise you sometime, I'll come around'
- if that's not the lyric to go hand in hand with a haunting, I don't know what is.
 
'I will surprise you sometime, I'll come around' - if that's not the lyric to go hand in hand with a haunting, I don't know what is.

*happy shriek* I hadn't picked that up!
 
Great track (no pun intended). Didn't mean to suggest that it's used on that documentary though - just went off on a tangent...which I do quite a lot..
 
I just found this book in my local Sainsburys today.
 

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Railways often run in remote places and at all times of day and night, tunnels and signal boxes
are often lonely strange places which very few people visit, walking a long tunnel can make even
the brave feel just a little uneasy. there are many stories about Railway Ghosts and one or to old
films, but this is my little tale so not in any book I have never told it before as I have put it down to
dreaming or imagination, but a few days ago someone I know told me a tale that made me decide
to share it.

We have lived were we are for over 20 years in that time but only wile sleeping in the back bedroom
I have heard a steam engine running at a good speed approaching from maybe a mile or two away
throttle well open and whistling up for the crossings it blows for 4 crossings getting closer and
louder then disappears suddenly as if shutting off steam for the station that is in a much modified
form still at the end of our road, I have always heard it on quiet still nights which is strange as the
railway as far as I know did not run that late, now when I have heard it I have just woken from
sleep so have thought it was a dream or imagination though it is very real and loud at the time.

Now when my daughter slept in that room she asked me a several occasions were the steam railway
was she was hearing the same thing and when I asked not long ago she said her and her friend had
heard the same thing when down the local woods, the railway ran along the edge and a private
branch went off to the salt mines trough the woods.

Then this week and this is what prompted me to type this, someone was telling me that they were down
the woods when younger with friends and they saw a line of people traveling along the old line all sat
as if on a train just floating along but no train or noise so maybe I am not dreaming after all.


The Railway is the Garstang and Knott End Railway the Cafe at the end of the slipway is the old
station the carpark were the platforms were and the big house on the far corner looking from
the carpark is the old stationmasters house for those that know the area closed around 1960
but had been freight only for some years, it runs quiet straight for about 10 miles and has more
that it's fare share of level crossings.


Anyone else have any interesting Railway tales there must be many people on here that have worked
on them.?
 
Railway ghosts begin very quickly after the railways themselves. Perhaps it was the loss-of-life associated with their creation or with early, gruesome accidents?

An 1821 death on the Middleton Railway, Leeds may underlie ghost stories there, though the sightings are undated.

Living close to a railway line in childhood, I can recall odd nights when trains I heard approaching and expected to pass, instead faded away. I would quiz my parents about branch-lines or sidings in the area - there were none*. The Liverpool-Southport line ended around midnight. In later years, I learned about the mysterious vehicles which would make nocturnal journeys to perform some maintenance tasks but their mechanical riveting noise was unlike the ghost-trains of my boyhood!

*It is quite possible that the sound was carried from the mainline station a mile or so away - especially on frosty nights. There were extensive sidings at Southport. Yet my childish impression was always of a train approaching then diverted into regions still unknown! :eek:
 
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When my Daughter first asked about the nearest steam railway my first thought was the trams about 1 mile
away across the river but she was adamant it was a steam train, and to be honest she had been on enough
of them to know, I had not heard it at this time, only other railway's are the West coast main line at Garstang
about 13 miles and the Preston Blackpool line at Poulton, they both have the odd steam train but you cant
hear them.
 
The Garstang and Knott End was a slow, bucolic, sleepy sort of organisation. no gruesome accidents of which I am aware, and probably never any full passenger trains for that matter. Which doesn't mean it has no ghosts, but if it does have any they are there for other reasons than being killed in a train crash.
 
There's a whole culture of railway ghosts out there. I've read a few books on the subject. Most old railway staff have a tale or two to tell. There're some on here, didn't we have a thread on it?

I heard a nice one last year. A colleague told me that a train driver of his acquaintance was taking a loco along near Milton Keynes, quite slowly, and glancing at the scenery as they do, to be aware of hazards. He noticed a cemetery nearby, and as he turned back to the track he noticed a woman sitting next to him.

The cab door is always locked when the train is moving and nobody could have got in. He was highly alarmed and was considering what to do when he looked away from her again and when he glanced back, she'd gone.

He didn't report this as he'd have been taken off operations on suspicion of mental problems. The person he told shouldn't have told me, but as I don't know who it is his secret is safe!
 
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