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ramonmercado

CyberPunk
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Time for a Reintroduced Animals thread. Can't find one.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-mid-wales-12805550

Beavers set for return to Wales for Ceredigion project

Beaver (generic) Beavers lived in Wales until the 12th Century

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Beavers are to be re-introduced to the Welsh countryside for the first time in at least 900 years.

Ceredigion-based Wales Wild Land Foundation will create an enclosed habitat for a pair of European beavers at Artist's Valley, near Machynlleth.

An observation area will also be built for visitors.

Monitoring and research will also be carried out to evaluate whether the beaver can be introduced into more enclosed sites or back into the wild.

The project has been backed by a £5,000 Big Lottery grant to pay for fencing and relocation costs.

Wales Wild Land Foundation, formed in 2009, is developing the project at a 75 acre site at Blaeneinion Farm, near Furnace in Ceredigion.

Aspirin

The two beavers, a male and female, will be transported from their current homes in Devon and Gloucestershire.

Simon Ayres, of Wales Wild Land Foundation, said: "We're finishing the planting programme and then some time in April we'll start working on putting the fence and hide up.

"We're then aiming to release the beavers in early summer.

"It's a really exciting time as people will soon be able to see the beavers from dawn to dusk in their natural environment.

"The site has a couple of ponds and plenty of willow trees for them to make their lodge and eat its leaves."

The European beaver (Castor fiber) is a herbivore and was once widespread throughout the UK and was sought after for its highly-prized pelt.

The oil found in the glands at the base of its tail contains salicylic acid (aspirin) which was used as medicine for headaches and fever in the middle ages.

Beavers lived in Wales until the 12th Century and the rest of Britain until the 16th Century but were hunted to extinction.

Gerald of Wales reported in 1188 that by then the river Teifi was its only habitat in Wales.

Scotland managed to hang onto its beavers - the last in the UK - until the 1600s and by the beginning of the 20th Century only a few colonies remained across Europe.

Successful reintroduction programmes have taken place in Scotland during the last few years.
 
Now it's Dorset's turn.

Beavers are back in Dorset after an absence of more than 400 years.

Dorset Wildlife Trust introduced an adult male and female into an enclosed site in the west of the county on Monday. They will live in a large area of freshwater habitat not accessible to the public which can be continually monitored by wildlife experts.

Rivers conservation officer Steve Oliver said welcoming beavers back to the county was "fantastic". He said besides being "magnificent creatures in their own right" they were "extra special because their engineering activities have the potential to bring even more life to a landscape and enable other species to flourish".

The Eurasian beavers were relocated from Scotland under licence from NatureScot, the country's nature agency.

The project is part of a scientific study by the University of Exeter and Wessex Water to monitor the impact Europe's largest rodent has on water quality, flooding and other wildlife.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-dorset-56000833
 
Now it's Dorset's turn.

Beavers are back in Dorset after an absence of more than 400 years.

Dorset Wildlife Trust introduced an adult male and female into an enclosed site in the west of the county on Monday. They will live in a large area of freshwater habitat not accessible to the public which can be continually monitored by wildlife experts.

Rivers conservation officer Steve Oliver said welcoming beavers back to the county was "fantastic". He said besides being "magnificent creatures in their own right" they were "extra special because their engineering activities have the potential to bring even more life to a landscape and enable other species to flourish".

The Eurasian beavers were relocated from Scotland under licence from NatureScot, the country's nature agency.

The project is part of a scientific study by the University of Exeter and Wessex Water to monitor the impact Europe's largest rodent has on water quality, flooding and other wildlife.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-dorset-56000833
This story reminded me of
The True History Behind Idaho's Parachuting Beavers

https://www.google.com/amp/s/time.com/4084997/parachuting-beavers-history/?amp=true
 
There's a few beaver colonies around the UK. Kent, Devon, Knapdale in Scotland (Argyll I think), also up to 100 have been killed around Tayside !.
Those are just the known ones, should think there's a few more out there.

Sea Eagles re-introduced to the Isle of Wight, Christchuch Harbour and Norfolk could be next.

Serious talk of Lynx being brought back , not so serious talk about wolves in Scotland, might be a good idea, too many red deer, look up wolf re-introduction in Yellowstone.

Storks re-introduced here in Sussex, successfully bred last year.

Cranes successfully re-introduced in Somerset now spreading .
 
Back in an urban setting.

Perth has become the first UK city to see resident urban beavers for hundreds of years, with the mammals establishing a "strong presence" there.

A new survey has found evidence of beaver activity on the River Tay, including in the centre of Perth. Signs of fresh activity were also seen on Moncreiffe Island and along the river at the North Inch.

Beavers were hunted to extinction in Britain in the 16th Century for their fur, meat, and scent glands.
The animals were reintroduced in Scotland in 2009 and are valued for their impact on ecosystems and abilities as "natural engineers".

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-tayside-central-56111873
 
The cranes are back!

A giant bird that has been part of Irish folklore and was often kept as a pet in medieval times could be returning to the island after an absence of more than 300 years.

A pair of cranes are nesting on a rewetted peat bog in the Republic of Ireland's midlands. It is hoped they could be the first of the species to breed in Ireland for centuries. The cranes are on land owned by former peat producer Bord na Móna. The location is to remain confidential to protect the birds.

In January, Bord na Móna ceased peat harvesting for good and has been rehabilitating thousands of hectares of boglands, rewetting the drained sites.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-57074156
 
Just desperate for Lynx to be reintroduced. Sadly the outfit making the most noise about it seem to be total idiots (see Private Eye) so it’s unlikely to happen in my lifetime
 
The eagles have landed.

White-tailed eagle chicks have arrived in Kerry today as part of a landmark collaboration to restore the native and once-extinct bird to Ireland.

As part of a long-term reintroduction project, 23 eagle chicks were collected from nests in west-central Norway and transported by plane to Kerry Airport.

They will be held for six-to-eight weeks at purpose-built flight cages at four sites in Munster as they are monitored and cared for by the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS).

Following this, the chicks will be released into the wild in early-mid August at four sites across the province including Killarney National Park, along the River Shannon, the lower Shannon estuary, and a site in Waterford.

https://www.irishexaminer.com/news/munster/arid-40322342.html
 
Gives a whole new meaning to fish falls. Vid at link


Thousands of fish dropped from plane to restock Utah lakes

This gives a new meaning to flying fish - wildlife authorities in Utah are restocking lakes with fish by dropping them out of a plane. Thousands can be dropped in a single flight into water that is inaccessible to other forms of transport.

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-us-canada-57793082
 
Gives a whole new meaning to fish falls. Vid at link


Thousands of fish dropped from plane to restock Utah lakes

This gives a new meaning to flying fish - wildlife authorities in Utah are restocking lakes with fish by dropping them out of a plane. Thousands can be dropped in a single flight into water that is inaccessible to other forms of transport.

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-us-canada-57793082
How many survive, I wonder?
 
Beautiful baby beaver born. Well I'll be dammed!

The first baby beaver to be born on Exmoor for 400 years has been captured on camera, the National Trust has said.

The baby, known as a kit, was spotted at the charity's Holnicote Estate in Somerset, where the animals were reintroduced in 2020. The once-native mammals are able to restore wetland habitats but were hunted to extinction for their fur, glands and meat in the 16th century. A ranger from the estate said the new family of beavers were "thriving".

The footage shows the beavers have successfully bred, with images from a static camera revealing the six-week-old kit swimming with its mother back to the family lodge, while she stops to nibble a branch.

Holnicote Estate ranger Jack Siviter said he was "pleased" to see the first-time beaver mum with the new baby.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-somerset-57808517
 
Beautiful baby beaver born. Well I'll be dammed!

The first baby beaver to be born on Exmoor for 400 years has been captured on camera, the National Trust has said.

The baby, known as a kit, was spotted at the charity's Holnicote Estate in Somerset, where the animals were reintroduced in 2020. The once-native mammals are able to restore wetland habitats but were hunted to extinction for their fur, glands and meat in the 16th century. A ranger from the estate said the new family of beavers were "thriving".

The footage shows the beavers have successfully bred, with images from a static camera revealing the six-week-old kit swimming with its mother back to the family lodge, while she stops to nibble a branch.

Holnicote Estate ranger Jack Siviter said he was "pleased" to see the first-time beaver mum with the new baby.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-somerset-57808517

And now in Norfolk.

A baby beaver has become the first to be born in Norfolk in more than 600 years, conservationists say.

The baby, known as a kit, was filmed paddling in water at Wild Ken Hill, near Heacham, where this year's BBC Springwatch was based. Two pairs of Eurasian beavers were reintroduced at the site last year.

Ecologist Lloyd Park said the discovery of the kit represents "an historic moment" for the return of the species.

The "ecosystem engineers", known for creating habitats for other animals, were hunted to extinction in Britain for their fur, glands and meat in the 16th Century.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-norfolk-58011639
 
The cranes are back!

A giant bird that has been part of Irish folklore and was often kept as a pet in medieval times could be returning to the island after an absence of more than 300 years.

A pair of cranes are nesting on a rewetted peat bog in the Republic of Ireland's midlands. It is hoped they could be the first of the species to breed in Ireland for centuries. The cranes are on land owned by former peat producer Bord na Móna. The location is to remain confidential to protect the birds.

In January, Bord na Móna ceased peat harvesting for good and has been rehabilitating thousands of hectares of boglands, rewetting the drained sites.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-57074156

Chicks hatched but may have died.

The first birth of crane chicks in Ireland for more than 300 years has been recorded.

Sadly, one chick disappeared shortly after first being seen in May and the second chick has not been seen since late June.

Ecologists have said that cranes are elusive by nature and that there is still a chance that the second chick may have survived and fledged. It is thought more likely that a predator such as a fox may have carried off the young bird, or it died for some other reason, but the births have been praised as it shows the conditions being created for cranes are suitable.

Common cranes had set up home on a rewetted peatland in the Midlands and two previous breeding attempts in 2019 and 2020 were unsuccessful. It can take several years for cranes to successfully fledge chicks.

The chicks hatched on Bord na Móna peatlands and their lead ecologist said that despite the potential demise of the chicks, it is good news.

https://www.irishexaminer.com/news/arid-40350899.html

 
More beavers! Cull the farmers!

A consultation is launching to seek people's views on whether beavers should be reintroduced to England's rivers.

The creatures were once widespread throughout Britain, but were hunted to extinction 400 years ago. Studies have shown that the return of the mammals could help to restore river habitats.

But the National Farmers' Union warned that beavers' dams can cause disruption.

The consultation will last for 12 weeks.

Environment Secretary George Eustice said: "Today marks a significant milestone for the reintroduction of beavers in the wild.

"But we also understand that there are implications for landowners, so we are taking a cautious approach to ensure that all potential impacts are carefully considered."

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-58322561
 
More beavers! Cull the farmers!

A consultation is launching to seek people's views on whether beavers should be reintroduced to England's rivers.

The creatures were once widespread throughout Britain, but were hunted to extinction 400 years ago. Studies have shown that the return of the mammals could help to restore river habitats.

But the National Farmers' Union warned that beavers' dams can cause disruption.

The consultation will last for 12 weeks.

Environment Secretary George Eustice said: "Today marks a significant milestone for the reintroduction of beavers in the wild.

"But we also understand that there are implications for landowners, so we are taking a cautious approach to ensure that all potential impacts are carefully considered."

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-58322561
What the hell do the public know about how beavers are going to help or hinder the natural environment, they should consult experts surely!
 
What the hell do the public know about how beavers are going to help or hinder the natural environment, they should consult experts surely!

Ask Joe Public and he’ll just say, “Aww, yes!”, because it won’t be his land that’s flooded or his trees that are felled.

Everyone’s happy to contemplate wolves, lynxes etc. being reintroduced. As long as it’s not near them, because Tibbles.

maximus otter
 
Ask Joe Public and he’ll just say, “Aww, yes!”, because it won’t be his land that’s flooded or his trees that are felled.

Everyone’s happy to contemplate wolves, lynxes etc. being reintroduced. As long as it’s not near them, because Tibbles.

maximus otter

The beavers know where you live! You're Damned!
 
Beavers return to London.

Beavers are being brought back to London for the first time in more than 400 years to help restore nature and river habitat and reduce flood risks.

A male and female beaver, both aged two, are being released into a specially designed enclosure in the grounds of Forty Hall Farm in Enfield. The species was hunted to extinction in Britain in the 16th century for its fur, glands and meat. Enfield Council and Capel Manor College devised the north London project.

Beavers are seen as natural engineers who restore wetland habitats through dam-building and felling trees, slowing, storing and filtering water in the landscape, which attracts other wildlife and reduces flooding downstream.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-60763438
 
When I lived in WDC, the locals were very happy to see beavers reintroduced. But then, the beavers suddenly became an anathema, and then just as suddenly disappeared. They had felled some popular cherry trees, part of the cherry blossom festival, were captured and then relocated far far away.

After a couple of years, the locals were once again wanting beavers on the downtown banks of the Potomac river to restore the balance of nature.

I am amazed how quickly a group of these furry eco-terrorists (this is the term used by my husband and me) can fell a big tree.
 
You want beavers, we'll be glad to send ya some from here in Canada. They have to wrap steel around the trees near Parliament to stop 'em getting eaten. And their dams flood so many farm fields the Armed Forces blow them up as training for new recruits (without the beavers inside, natch).
 
You want beavers, we'll be glad to send ya some from here in Canada. They have to wrap steel around the trees near Parliament to stop 'em getting eaten. And their dams flood so many farm fields the Armed Forces blow them up as training for new recruits (without the beavers inside, natch).
Fraid we can’t have them as they are not Eurasian beavers and we can only have tattooed beer-swilling ones.
 
Beavers return to London.

Beavers are being brought back to London for the first time in more than 400 years to help restore nature and river habitat and reduce flood risks.

A male and female beaver, both aged two, are being released into a specially designed enclosure in the grounds of Forty Hall Farm in Enfield. The species was hunted to extinction in Britain in the 16th century for its fur, glands and meat. Enfield Council and Capel Manor College devised the north London project.

Beavers are seen as natural engineers who restore wetland habitats through dam-building and felling trees, slowing, storing and filtering water in the landscape, which attracts other wildlife and reduces flooding downstream.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-60763438

Cane toad
Muntjac
Grey squirrel
Feral cat
African bee

Beaver

- It's got to work this time, right?

giphy.gif


maximus otter
 
Mystery beavers at Longleat

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m000ywj5/animal-park-summer-2021-episode-7

There’s an unusual mix of animals at Longleat house - hippos share a lake with sealions, & there’s wolves, tigers, rhinos, giant ant eaters so on.

Unexpected beavers appeared - 2 lodges found around 1½ miles apart. They weren’t sure for a while whether it was one pair of beavers with a large territory or two pairs. They find in fact it’s two pairs. They’re delighted but mystified as to where they’ve come from, beavers not being common..
 
None of these were native in the UK. Except beavers.
Beavers were 500 years ago. There simply is no predicting what the re-introduction of them will do to ecosystems. I think it's just virtue signalling by faux conservationists, who don't want to spend time or do any hard yards on the non-photogenic indigenous species at risk, like eels, or the native crayfish (@maximus otter you left out Signal Crayfish), water voles, or 'insects in general'.
 
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