Remarkable Mice

Xanatic*

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We had a mouse trap for catching the mouse. The mouse managed to get into the trap, take the bait and then return later and put a nut in it's place instead. All without getting caught.
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
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We had a mouse trap for catching the mouse. The mouse managed to get into the trap, take the bait and then return later and put a nut in it's place instead. All without getting caught.
Your mouse is taking the piss. It's intelligent!
 

JamesWhitehead

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I have to admit that vermin and insects bring out my inner-Dalek. Taking them out into the country to breed reinforcements would cost petrol-money!

I note that mainstream shops are encouraging us to poison the buggers - a method which risks putrifying corpses under your floorboards. Olde-Tyme traps are available at the poundies - often three or four for a pound.

Presumably they are assembled by blind children in sweat-shops, so I am extra-cautious in setting the things, wondering if tensioning the spring might be the last thing I see before my own eye receives the full force of the failed mechanism!

I know, a cat would save all this mither, while creating a whole lot more! :cat:
 

ramonmercado

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Should get them to watch Of Mice And Men.

The eerie opening shot of the slow drive of a bomb-carrying car in Orson Welles’ 1958 Touch of Evil prompts strong reactions in film watchers.

Now reactions in the brains of an unusual audience — mice — offer a major twist in our understanding of how brain cells parse visual scenes.
Scientists used to think that each of the many cells in the brain’s visual system primarily handles a single job, such as responding to a black and white contrast. But a study published December 16 in Nature Neuroscience does away with that simplicity.

Researchers including Saskia de Vries, a neuroscientist at the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle, used a powerful microscope to study 59,610 brain cells in the visual systems of live mice, through openings in their skulls. The researchers then watched whether these cells responded to (or ignored) a lineup of visual input, including clips from Touch of Evil and simpler images, such as drifting black stripes and a still picture of a butterfly.

The way that the nerve cells, or neurons, behaved was a surprise. Overall, only about 10 percent of the neurons studied responded as the researchers expected, based on data from earlier studies. “The remaining neurons don’t look like what’s going on in the textbook,” de Vries says.

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/mice-watching-movies-show-surprising-complexity-vision-cells
 

ramonmercado

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Beyond the reach of cats?

A South American mouse is the world’s highest-dwelling mammal
By Jack J. Lee 24 HOURS AGO

A yellow-rumped leaf-eared mouse has shattered the world record as the highest-dwelling mammal yet documented.

The mouse (Phyllotis xanthopygus rupestris) was found 6,739 meters, or 22,110 feet, above sea level on the summit of Volcán Llullaillaco, a dormant volcano on the border of Chile and Argentina. For comparison, Mount Everest is 8,848 meters high (29,029 feet).

The record was previously held by the large-eared pika (Ochotona macrotis), reported at an altitude of 6,130 meters during a 1921 Mount Everest expedition. Birds have been found at even higher altitudes (SN: 2/13/14).

That mammals can live at these heights is astonishing, considering there’s only about 44 percent of the oxygen available at sea level. “It’s very difficult to sustain any kind of physical activity, or mental activity for that matter,” says Jay Storz, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. The temperature is also rarely above freezing and can drop as low as –60° Celsius.

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/south-american-mouse-world-highest-dwelling-mammal
 
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