1970s: Why So Dark?

Spookdaddy

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CarlosTheDJ said:
escargot1 said:
...Have you seen the documentary about them? Think it was on Sky Arts.

Possibly the funniest thing we've ever seen. :lol:

No I didn't! Any idea what it was called?

I'd recommend the Judas Priest related documentary, Dream Deceivers - clearly not the one Escargot is talking about, because it's decidedly NOT funny.

It's available on YouTube, but I would warn anyone of a squeamish disposition that one of the main players in the film is extremely facially disfigured as a result of shotgun related injuries.

If that kind of stuff upsets you - don't go there.
 

CarlosTheDJ

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Yeah I saw that one when it was on TV. Unbelievable that he survived wounds like that.
 

Yithian

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Sometimes you wish you'd taken someone's word for it.
That is a troubling sight to see, and doubly so when you consider what caused it.
 

escargot

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The Judas Priest documentary we saw didn't feature anyone with facial injuries. It was a straightforward account of the band's rise to global success.

:lol:
 

GNC

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The fact that Rob Halford's "look" was more appropriate for the Leatherman in the Village People was amusing enough. Something else amusing, the legendary underground short Heavy Metal Parking Lot:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=whZuz5Dwtw8

I have a feeling the lady wanting to "jump Rob's bones" would be disappointed.
 

escargot

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Never mind Rob Halford's brilliant coup of dressing every heavy metal fan in the world as a San Francisco clone. :lol:

What about cigarette machines in people's houses? A bloke'd come round every week and take away the money and replace the cigarettes. I only remember seeing one, in a house in Stoke, back in about 1974. I was stunned. :shock:
 

Mythopoeika

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Spookdaddy said:

AFAIK, it's still available - but who the hell buys it???? :shock:
 

DougalLongfoot

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Kondoru said:
Because viewing culture and time as static makes sense, does it?

Just when were the Aboriginals (and the native americans for that matter) given citizenship...It was quite late, wasn't it?

Sorry to derail the thread, Ive been meaning to ask this some time.

Australian Citizenship was created in 1949. Under the Constitution, the Federal Government did not have the power to make laws with regards to Aborigines, nor were they counted in the census. Aboriginal "welfare" was the responsibility of the state governments, and restrictions were quite varied. An aboriginal person who could prove they were "responsible" enough to manage their own affairs could apply to be exempted from the state acts, and thus gain full citizenship. The legal position was changed with the referendum in 1967. It included aborigines in the census and gave the Federal Government powers to make laws with regards to any race.

This is an excellent website:

http://indigenousrights.net.au/default.asp

Particularly this page:

http://indigenousrights.net.au/subsection.asp?ssID=13

Click on the document at the bottom of the page to read a summary of the various state acts in 1962.

Of course, just because the referendum passed in 1967, didn't mean everything was suddenly a land of milk and honey for our indigenous brethren, even today for many (most?) of them.
 

Kondoru

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Thanks a lot, its one of those stupid things that has been bugging me for some time.

(I imagine it varies from state to state in the US)
 

Floyd1

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Just found this thread and Yes, I have said the same thing. I didn't realise anyone else thought the same though!

To my eyes, it started around 73/74, (although you could even say from 1969 things got darker somehow). I first noticed it with album covers. The hippy/free love/psychedlic era had pretty much gone and bands like Black Sabbath were starting out. Dennis Wheatley was very popular as were the Hammer Horror films. The Manson family were still very much in people's minds too.

As for actual 'darkness' in the literal sense, it certainly was for me growing up in dark, freezing old cottage, and a lot of the tv shows were as well.
People wore beige and brown a lot (as were the cars) and a heck of a lot of shows like the Avengers/the Saint etc had a lot of nighttime shots (ironically these were usually filmed in the day, but with a filter over the camera which gave it an even stranger ambience). Even American shows (often filmed in sunny California) weren't as 'glamorous' as they are today. The interior shots on Columbo for eg are often dark (perhaps partly due to the age of the film through wear and tear and storage), but more likely due to the dark browns and reds that were so popular back then.
Then in UK at least, it was the Yorkshire Ripper, IRA Bombings and Northern Ireland on TV every night which didn't help matters.
Of course you did still have the 'brighter' stuff on tv but I definitely remember it as a dark time.
 

Naughty_Felid

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Just found this thread and Yes, I have said the same thing. I didn't realise anyone else thought the same though!

To my eyes, it started around 73/74, (although you could even say from 1969 things got darker somehow). I first noticed it with album covers. The hippy/free love/psychedlic era had pretty much gone and bands like Black Sabbath were starting out. Dennis Wheatley was very popular as were the Hammer Horror films. The Manson family were still very much in people's minds too.

As for actual 'darkness' in the literal sense, it certainly was for me growing up in dark, freezing old cottage, and a lot of the tv shows were as well.
People wore beige and brown a lot (as were the cars) and a heck of a lot of shows like the Avengers/the Saint etc had a lot of nighttime shots (ironically these were usually filmed in the day, but with a filter over the camera which gave it an even stranger ambience). Even American shows (often filmed in sunny California) weren't as 'glamorous' as they are today. The interior shots on Columbo for eg are often dark (perhaps partly due to the age of the film through wear and tear and storage), but more likely due to the dark browns and reds that were so popular back then.
Then in UK at least, it was the Yorkshire Ripper, IRA Bombings and Northern Ireland on TV every night which didn't help matters.
Of course you did still have the 'brighter' stuff on tv but I definitely remember it as a dark time.


Nope, long, hot beautiful summer days when a proper summer started when it should have started and had the grace to end when it should have ended ready for conkers, Halloween, and bonfire night.

Winter has snow. Spring glorious.

Not the hustle and bustle of the mindlessness of today.
 

JaneD

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Just found this thread and Yes, I have said the same thing. I didn't realise anyone else thought the same though!

To my eyes, it started around 73/74, (although you could even say from 1969 things got darker somehow). I first noticed it with album covers. The hippy/free love/psychedlic era had pretty much gone and bands like Black Sabbath were starting out. Dennis Wheatley was very popular as were the Hammer Horror films. The Manson family were still very much in people's minds too.

As for actual 'darkness' in the literal sense, it certainly was for me growing up in dark, freezing old cottage, and a lot of the tv shows were as well.
People wore beige and brown a lot (as were the cars) and a heck of a lot of shows like the Avengers/the Saint etc had a lot of nighttime shots (ironically these were usually filmed in the day, but with a filter over the camera which gave it an even stranger ambience). Even American shows (often filmed in sunny California) weren't as 'glamorous' as they are today. The interior shots on Columbo for eg are often dark (perhaps partly due to the age of the film through wear and tear and storage), but more likely due to the dark browns and reds that were so popular back then.
Then in UK at least, it was the Yorkshire Ripper, IRA Bombings and Northern Ireland on TV every night which didn't help matters.
Of course you did still have the 'brighter' stuff on tv but I definitely remember it as a dark time.
Brown and swirly interiors and no central heating until about 1975. That’s how i remember the 70s. Some great music though
 

Naughty_Felid

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Brown and swirly interiors and no central heating until about 1975. That’s how i remember the 70s. Some great music though

or kitchen-item styled wallpaper. Hey, I'm looking at lots of fruit, chickens, kitchen implements, Andy Warholesque but done in french restaurant style..
 

Mythopoeika

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My parents put some dark-coloured wallpaper in an alcove back in the 70s, making it darker. It had an interesting Egyptian theme on it (pharaohs riding chariots). It didn't stay there long.
 

Floyd1

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Nope, long, hot beautiful summer days when a proper summer started when it should have started and had the grace to end when it should have ended ready for conkers, Halloween, and bonfire night.

Winter has snow. Spring glorious.

Not the hustle and bustle of the mindlessness of today.
Well, the original question/thought posed by McAvennie didn't allude to the weather/climate of the 1970s or if the pace of life was slower then. It referred to the darkness of the tv shows, films and documentaries of the time. I expanded it to mention the books, music and the news that filled our screens night after night. Not to mention all the strikes, only three channels on tv ( in colour if you were lucky) and power cuts.

Of course we still had summers, (and also long hard winters- where I grew up anyway), but the darkness of the era, literally and figuratively was definitely there. I'd even extend it to around 1981 ish.
 

blessmycottonsocks

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Whilst I remember the power cuts, winter of discontent, riots, cold war paranoia etc. I was young, so life felt great!
Also, for me the 70's (or perhaps more strictly 1968 to 1978) were the decade of brilliant prog-rock and heavy metal music.
All of the following songs are still regulars on my playlist:
Yes - And You and I
Genesis - The Musical Box
Van Der Graaf Generator - Refugees
Focus - Hocus Pocus
Jethro Tull - Thick as a Brick
Uriah Heep - July Morning
Camel - Lady Fantasy
Barclay James Harvest - She Said
Emerson Lake & Palmer - Karn Evil 9
King Crimson - Starless
Pink Floyd - Comfortably Numb
 
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Cochise

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I also had a pretty excellent 1970's, after a pretty horrible 1960's. My eye got fixed in 1970 so I didn't have to wear a patch, and I started to get more varied friends.

Through the decade I was playing in a number of rock bands, girlfriends you could have put on album covers (in particular one who looked like Debbie Harry), plenty of cash - the wheels did start to come off about 1978 though. Had a rough time from 1980 through 1984 and then things righted themselves again for a couple of decades.

Can I start over from 1974 please?
 

Cochise

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Whilst I remember the power cuts, winter of discontent, riots, cold war paranoia etc. I was young, so life felt great!
Also, for me the 70's (or perhaps more strictly 1968 to 1978) were the decade of brilliant prog-rock and heavy metal music.
All of the following songs are still regulars on my playlist:
Yes - And You and I
Genesis - The Musical Box

Van Der Graaf Generator - Refugees
Focus - Hocus Pocus
Jethro Tull - Thick as a Brick
Uriah Heep - July Morning
Camel - Lady Fantasy
Barclay James Harvest - She Said
Emerson Lake & Palmer - Karn Evil 9
King Crimson - Starless
Pink Floyd - Comfortably Numb
Bold are all still on my play list, along with , from the same bands
Van der Graaf Generator - Arrow
Uriah Heep - Easy Livin', Stealin'
Jethro Tull - Witches' Promise.

Not a BJH fan, and never really got exposed to Camel for some reason. One almost forgotten band I liked very much at the time is Family, although IIRC they finished fairly early in the decade. Thin Lizzy is another favourite - the style journey from their early to late albums is amazing.

Genesis' three early albums - Trespass, Nursey Cryme, and Foxtrot I all still play regularly - I think they are absolute genius especially given the ages of the band members at the time. The 70's were definitely an album decade - the charts especially in the middle of the decade were utter rubbish.

I'll stop wittering on now - I could fill pages. I LOVE 70's music. Even punk. (not all of it, obs.)
 

Patrick30

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The 70s were my teenage years. It was a decade of do your own thing and debauchery for the most part. The social idealism of the 60s was past but everyone seemed to be ok with paddling your own canoe. The music was great. I had fun. Then disco and the 80s over commercialized everything, plus I had to grow up and earn a living.
 

Patrick30

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Complain about 70s music all you want but it was way more diverse than today. Sure there was pop pablum but there was also the Allman Bros, skynyrd, Springsteen, the Dead kept trucking on, Pink Floyd, ELP, Steely Dan, a ton of great singer songwriters, etc.
 

maximus otter

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Whilst I remember the power cuts, winter of discontent, riots, cold war paranoia etc. I was young, so life felt great!
Also, for me the 70's (or perhaps more strictly 1968 to 1978) were the decade of brilliant prog-rock and heavy metal music.
All of the following songs are still regulars on my playlist:
Yes - And You and I
Genesis - The Musical Box
Van Der Graaf Generator - Refugees
Focus - Hocus Pocus
Jethro Tull - Thick as a Brick
Uriah Heep - July Morning
Camel - Lady Fantasy
Barclay James Harvest - She Said
Emerson Lake & Palmer - Karn Evil 9
King Crimson - Starless
Pink Floyd - Comfortably Numb

Saw King Crimson live at the Regal Cinema, Cambridge in May ‘71.

Genesis plus the Pink Fairies (IIRC) in the same time frame. ( I remember it cost £1.50! )

maximus otter
 
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