Coincidences

escargot

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Here're a couple of Facebook/cycling coincidences.

Today we admired a low-flying small plane that was buzzing a nearby field.
I said 'Oooer, it's like North By Northwest!' and we laughed.

Later Techy cycled so fast over a humpbacked bridge he reckoned he briefly left the ground, like the Dukes of Hazzard.
We said 'Yee-ha!' and again we laughed.

Back home later Techy posted our route on Facebook and I eventually looked for it.

On my feed I saw a recommendation for an Alfred Hitchcock page, with the following still from North By Northwest -

North By Northwest.jpg

followed by a joke about the Dukes of Hazzard car -

dukes of hazzard.jpg

My phone was in a back pocket of my cycling shirt so not listening in!
 

Ermintruder

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Last Sunday morning, my SO and I were out driving (on a visit to one of our children)- don't worry, my curious rambling does include some (very) relevant points)

I randomly turned-on the car radio to BBC Radio 2, and we were half-listening to The Michael Ball Show (hear the archived content yourself at https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/michaelballshow20210718 ).

(Please don't presume that this all categorises me as a parochial past-it pleb: I've plenty alternative evidence to both prove and counter that impression!)

Michael started his "It's On The Ball" phone-in competition....and a Welshman named Reece Thomas, and his mother Marion, were the inconsequential contestants.

At 38mins 41secs into the show, Marion's question was "list as many puzzle or quiz-related (British) TV shows as you can". By 39mins 36secs, the question had been falteringly-answered by Marion, then summarised by Michael Ball (he gave a considerable cross-sectional list of shows, spanning 30+ years).

Both my SO and I immediately/approximately then said to each-other "aha, notice that Michael Ball didn't include Crosswits?". Neither of us knew that both of us had been fans of the show (which started on UK TV before we met each-other, and we've no recollection of ever having talked between us about it before).

Both my SO and I then/approximately said to each-other "hey, I wonder what good-old Tom O'Conner is up to these days?" (Tom was the main host of the show until its end, and as well as being a comedian and a former teacher, he was a bit of a closet philosopher)

The sad non-metaphorical answer to that question is: that we found-out later on, mid-way through Monday.... Tom O'Conner had just died. On the very day we mentioned him, for the first time in maybe 20 years- perhaps just a few hours before we both suddenly/seperately thought of him.

Perhaps he was just checking-out, and somehow said hello in passing.....was anyone else tuned-in, at that time, a week ago? :-/

quote-your-distress-about-life-might-mean-you-have-been-living-for-the-wrong-reason-not-that-tom-o-connor-56-39-41.jpg

 
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hunck

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I just had an Ivor Cutler coincidence which is far too mundane to detail but somehow seems fitting with the man himself.
 

Mikefule

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Two this week.

My wife and I sometimes watch the quiz show, Pointless. We don't always watch the most recent one, we just go onto iPlayer and find one we've not seen.

On Monday we saw one in which one of the answers was an "obscure" Olympic swimmer, Anita Lonsbrough. I do not believe I had ever heard that name before. The episode was not themed on the Olympics. However, of course, the Olympics are on at the moment.

The next day, Tuesday, my eye was drawn to an article on the BBC website about how Anita Lonsbrough met her husband at the Olympics over 50 years ago.



However, on Tuesday, a customer rang me As part of my process, I had to check her address. It was a village called Trimley St Mary. I do not believe I had ever heard of the village before. I remember commenting to her that it sounded like the sort of village where Miss Marple might investigate a murder.

Today,I saw on the BBC website an article about an arrest in connection with a 1999 murder in Trimley St Mary.
 

escargot

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Last night I nipped out for groceries and picked up a big tray of strawberries* and a tub of cream. We gorged ourselves happily.
Later Techy told me he'd been discussing the dangers of climate change with a colleague and had said 'Can you imagine a world without strawberries? What a disaster!'

OK, it's summer and we all like strawberries. But I didn't know they were on his mind. Or I thought I didn't. :wink2:


*This could end badly. I once ate a load of fresh strawberries late at night and next morning had sudden explosive (but painless) diarrhoea. This was on way to work, on my bike, approaching a roundabout, wearing jeans and a hi-viz running shirt.

I thought uh-oh, better nip home! and continued round the roundabout - no choice as there was traffic behind me - and let myself in through the back gate to inspect the damage in private.

It had shot up my back like a loathsome volcano, turning my shirt brown right up to the collar.

The driver following me must've seen the whole thing as they followed me home. I bet they changed their route after that.
 

GingerTabby

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Current events in Afghanistan have prompted me to revisit Peter Hopkirk's books on the Great Game. I suspected he'd passed on, so earlier today I googled his name to find out. Sadly, my hunch was correct. The coincidence is that, according to Wikipedia, PH died at age 83 on 22 August 2014.
 

maximus otter

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Yesterday l tried to check the local weather forecast on the BBC weather app, but with no luck. For some incomprehensible ‘pootery reason, it declared that it couldn’t find out where l was, and l should try again later.

Later arrived, and l tried again. This time, for no earthly reason, it decided that l was in Takoradi, Ghana, and displayed the weather for that estimable metropolis! (A pleasant, temperate afternoon, BTW.)

I can assure my reader that l have never tried to check the Ghanaian weather, nor have l ever Googled “Takoradi”, or done anything else to have that city lurking in my iPad’s memory.

The coincidence is that Takoradi features more than once in my late dad’s WWII RAF log books. He was a Wireless Operator on Dakotas, and served all over the world. lt was the starting point of what became known as the West African Reinforcement Route, by which aircraft were assembled at Takoradi, then ferried to the Middle East by an established route:


25.-Air-Vice-Marshal-Don-Hills-who-has-died-aged-95-was-an-RAF-equipment-officer-and-ensured-that-Allied-aircraft-could-take-the-fight-to-the-skies-in-the-Second-World-War-no-matter-what.jpg


Other stops on that route also occur regularly in dad’s log books: El Fasher, Khartoum, Wadi Halfa…

What are the odds that a random computer glitch could throw me a reference to an obscure town thousands of miles away, to which l have a tenuous family connection?

maximus otter
 

Victory

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Some non-descript coincidences have happened to me this past week.

Truly think they are a sign that G-D is showing he is at work, even though it does not feel like I am in the right place in my life.

I was thinking about someone I knew whose initials are AD.
The next day, I saw someone different but with that exact name listed as an employee where I work.
Then today, a customer with that name called in.

Also I was thinking about someone I know with the surname Green, and two customers in a row with that name called in.
 

Victory

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And today... a customer called Mr Wood, immediately followed by a customer called Mr Woodside.

I wondered if customers are allotted to call centre advisors on an alphabetical basis, but even if they are, both customers called in at an almost identical time.
 

JahaRa

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When I was a kid we lived in a small village in the mountains. The elementary school was so small they only had 3, and later 4 teachers and the older kids were bused to the next town 10 miles away. There were 4 boys who were cousins 2 from each family, the mothers were sisters. The sisters were 2 of several siblings. One family lived on the property next to ours (we had 5 acres) and the oldest son was my age. I used to play with both of those boys often. One day one of their other aunts was visiting with her two daughters. One was our age but would have nothing to do with us and the other was 2 years younger and did not play with us. She was angry about something, and it was funny because she swung in the swing so hard that it finally fell over (the swing set was not rooted to the ground). Her two cousins ran over and worried that she was hurt, but she got up angrily and stomped into the house (she was 5, we were 7). We went back to our game and I thought nothing of it.

13 years later I was in the army and was stationed in Germany. When I got to the unit everyone asked where I was from. "Albuquerque", oh you must know Adela, she's from Albuquerque too. I had no clue who Adela was. I said something silly like "Albuquerque has 80,000 people, I can't know all of them."

It turned out Adela was that 5 year old and both our families had moved to Albuquerque and I had classes with Adela's sister in junior high. Her father was in the Army and they moved around a lot so after junior high I never saw her sister. It turned out we were working together so we did talk about what schools we went to, etc. I don't think I ever told her I remembered the incident with the swing, but she did catch me up on what her 4 cousins that lived in that village were up to.
 

Mungoman

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When I was a kid we lived in a small village in the mountains. The elementary school was so small they only had 3, and later 4 teachers and the older kids were bused to the next town 10 miles away. There were 4 boys who were cousins 2 from each family, the mothers were sisters. The sisters were 2 of several siblings. One family lived on the property next to ours (we had 5 acres) and the oldest son was my age. I used to play with both of those boys often. One day one of their other aunts was visiting with her two daughters. One was our age but would have nothing to do with us and the other was 2 years younger and did not play with us. She was angry about something, and it was funny because she swung in the swing so hard that it finally fell over (the swing set was not rooted to the ground). Her two cousins ran over and worried that she was hurt, but she got up angrily and stomped into the house (she was 5, we were 7). We went back to our game and I thought nothing of it.

13 years later I was in the army and was stationed in Germany. When I got to the unit everyone asked where I was from. "Albuquerque", oh you must know Adela, she's from Albuquerque too. I had no clue who Adela was. I said something silly like "Albuquerque has 80,000 people, I can't know all of them."

It turned out Adela was that 5 year old and both our families had moved to Albuquerque and I had classes with Adela's sister in junior high. Her father was in the Army and they moved around a lot so after junior high I never saw her sister. It turned out we were working together so we did talk about what schools we went to, etc. I don't think I ever told her I remembered the incident with the swing, but she did catch me up on what her 4 cousins that lived in that village were up to.
Love it!
 

Victory

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We recently all saw the tragedy in Miami where an apartment block collapsed with large loss of life, still lived in by residents in spite of engineers warning it was structurally not safe.

On Saturday in Holon (next to Tel Aviv) in Israel, an apartment block was evacuated by engineers who warned it was at immininent risk of collapse.

The next day it collapsed, mercifully whilst empty of people.

36 families normally live there.

Not quite a Coincidence, but extraordinary how one warning was acted on, another not.



 

Little_grey_lady

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I was on a shift last night with someone I haven't seen for a long time - the last time I saw him, he was starting to learn Spanish during lockdown. When I saw him, I asked how it was going and he told me it was good, but he wanted to improve his conversation more, as the apps he was using weren't good at that. A litle later I opened FB and a pub local to the two of us had advertised beginner Spanish conversation lessons starting tonight!

Whilst I'm sure FB algorhythms(aka listening in devices) may have had something to do with it being one of the first posts I saw, it's still a pretty good coincidence that they were starting the very thing he wanted, the day after he was telling me about it.
 

JahaRa

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We recently all saw the tragedy in Miami where an apartment block collapsed with large loss of life, still lived in by residents in spite of engineers warning it was structurally not safe.

On Saturday in Holon (next to Tel Aviv) in Israel, an apartment block was evacuated by engineers who warned it was at immininent risk of collapse.

The next day it collapsed, mercifully whilst empty of people.

36 families normally live there.

Not quite a Coincidence, but extraordinary how one warning was acted on, another not.



Extraordinary how much difference a government based on protecting the population makes from one more concerned with profit for the corporations.
 

Floyd1

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We recently all saw the tragedy in Miami where an apartment block collapsed with large loss of life, still lived in by residents in spite of engineers warning it was structurally not safe.

On Saturday in Holon (next to Tel Aviv) in Israel, an apartment block was evacuated by engineers who warned it was at immininent risk of collapse.

The next day it collapsed, mercifully whilst empty of people.

36 families normally live there.

Not quite a Coincidence, but extraordinary how one warning was acted on, another not.



I don't know what caused this, but only very recently I have commented about how I believe that Israel will be in big trouble soon with all their 50s/60s era buildings. Just about everything in Israel is made from poured concrete- ie cast in-situ. Many, many times you will see the rebar showing through the concrete. Often very thin rebar at that. A lot of these building were thrown up very quickly after the war years as well.
Add in the salt air from the sea and you're going to have problems.
 

Mythopoeika

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I don't know what caused this, but only very recently I have commented about how I believe that Israel will be in big trouble soon with all their 50s/60s era buildings. Just about everything in Israel is made from poured concrete- ie cast in-situ. Many, many times you will see the rebar showing through the concrete. Often very thin rebar at that. A lot of these building were thrown up very quickly after the war years as well.
Add in the salt air from the sea and you're going to have problems.
Yes, indeed. Rebar will rust away inside the concrete and then one day it will go boom.
This is why I persuaded my Mum to have her garage pulled down... because otherwise it would have fallen down suddenly.
 

Victory

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I don't know what caused this, but only very recently I have commented about how I believe that Israel will be in big trouble soon with all their 50s/60s era buildings. Just about everything in Israel is made from poured concrete- ie cast in-situ. Many, many times you will see the rebar showing through the concrete. Often very thin rebar at that. A lot of these building were thrown up very quickly after the war years as well.
Add in the salt air from the sea and you're going to have problems.

So many of the buildings are near identical apartment blocks...much of Tel Aviv is like this...a lot fo it built in the 1920's and 30's.

Then further in the 1950's and 60's as you point out.

Building continues apace, and rebuilding will need to also.
 

Floyd1

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Yes, indeed. Rebar will rust away inside the concrete and then one day it will go boom.
This is why I persuaded my Mum to have her garage pulled down... because otherwise it would have fallen down suddenly.
Was it poured concrete or pre-cast panels (that's what garages that have been added on later here normally are here).
 

Floyd1

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So many of the buildings are near identical apartment blocks...much of Tel Aviv is like this...a lot fo it built in the 1920's and 30's.

Then further in the 1950's and 60's as you point out.

Building continues apace, and rebuilding will need to also.
Yes. - I'm not so much saying that the earlier ones were necessarily 'bad workmanship', just that the concrete wasn't as good as it would be today and they'd use thicker rebar today also. The smaller houses will probably be fine for years to come.
Another thing is that with the modern buildings they often clad them in artificial stone which hides the bare concrete but can also hide defects-like water getting in unnoticed, (a bit like render can do here.) It's not really a problem in Israel though as there is so little rain there.
 

maximus otter

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Extraordinary how much difference a government based on protecting the population makes from one more concerned with profit for the corporations.

Floyd1 said:
Just about everything in Israel is made from poured concrete- ie cast in-situ. Many, many times you will see the rebar showing through the concrete. Often very thin rebar at that. A lot of these building were thrown up very quickly…

There’s a compatibility issue between these assertions…

maximus otter
 

PeteS

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Didn't know whether to put this in lost and found, but a bit of a coincidence anyway. Having nearly completed a small but annoyingly awkward repair on my old convertabubbly, I couldn't locate 2 rather obscure 7/16 UNF nuts. In a manly fashion, I searched everywhere, house garage toolboxes everywhere for several days but no luck. Yesterday duck under half open garage door, stare at car, and throwing a bit of a wobbler yell "these nuts are driving me nuts" as I yank open the door from the inside to fully open, whereupon the 2 nuts hit me fully in the face! I must have knocked them off my toolbox into the U channel at the bottom of the door. Blue air infiltrates garage.
Of course 'twas only afterwards when I perused Ebay that I found they were readily available for bobbins. Further rant, followed by much eye rolling on part of MsPetes.
 

Floyd1

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There’s a compatibility issue between these assertions…

maximus otter
It's not that the older buidings there are crap as such- in fact solid concrete is great in a very hot, dry climate (in the north they do get a bit damp inside during the few days of 'winter' that they have, due to being solid, ie no cavity like we have to have), but otherwise they are fine. It's just that after 60 -100 years the concrete and rebar of the time is past its date really.
 

Mythopoeika

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Was it poured concrete or pre-cast panels (that's what garages that have been added on later here normally are here).
My Dad assembled it from a kit in the late 1950s. The uprights and other structural bits were concrete with pretty poor rebar inside. The side panels that were just slotted into place were made from concrete with steel webbing inside - not even rebar. The concrete broke off over the years to expose the rusty metal. The only thing holding it up was a brick wall I'd built in the 80s.
 

catseye

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I was on a shift last night with someone I haven't seen for a long time - the last time I saw him, he was starting to learn Spanish during lockdown. When I saw him, I asked how it was going and he told me it was good, but he wanted to improve his conversation more, as the apps he was using weren't good at that. A litle later I opened FB and a pub local to the two of us had advertised beginner Spanish conversation lessons starting tonight!

Whilst I'm sure FB algorhythms(aka listening in devices) may have had something to do with it being one of the first posts I saw, it's still a pretty good coincidence that they were starting the very thing he wanted, the day after he was telling me about it.
I just came over to this page for a catch up, from reading a page on UK Reddit about phones listening in to converstions (impossibility of technology thereof). I feel I should shout Bingo! or similar.

Edit to add - it was this page https://www.reddit.com/r/AskUK/comments/ponseg
 

Victory

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Yes. - I'm not so much saying that the earlier ones were necessarily 'bad workmanship', just that the concrete wasn't as good as it would be today and they'd use thicker rebar today also. The smaller houses will probably be fine for years to come.
Another thing is that with the modern buildings they often clad them in artificial stone which hides the bare concrete but can also hide defects-like water getting in unnoticed, (a bit like render can do here.) It's not really a problem in Israel though as there is so little rain there.

The earlier ones were often built hurriedly. The build quality can be questionable.

Not so much rain there, true, but when it rains it is usually heavy rain which can find it's way in and cause leaks.
 

CarlosTheDJ

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I just came over to this page for a catch up, from reading a page on UK Reddit about phones listening in to converstions (impossibility of technology thereof). I feel I should shout Bingo! or similar.

Edit to add - it was this page https://www.reddit.com/r/AskUK/comments/ponseg

If you have an Android phone it will constantly be 'listening' to pick up a voice command you might give.

Android is a Google OS, you have to be logged into Google to use the phone.

So that data is gathered along with everything else you do while online and is used to create your Google profile, which then targets the adverts.

I would imagine iPhones work in the same way, but it's not essential to be logged in to Google. Presumably iOS, Siri and Safari have connectivity.

So if your phone 'hears' something, Google 'remembers' it, and then the next time you're on any device and logged into the same Google account, you're going to see ads relating to what you were talking about. It's not really any different to doing a text search.

If you own a voice activated phone I would imagine you agreed to all this in some T&Cs somewhere along the line.

You can tell Google not to track your voice, it's in the settings somewhere. I've done that, I have to for work - we realised that any smartphone in the room during a confidential meeting could actually be recording it, even passively, which is a massive data breach. Switching it off does work, on Android at least.
 

Kryptonite

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Last night I nipped out for groceries and picked up a big tray of strawberries* and a tub of cream. We gorged ourselves happily.
Later Techy told me he'd been discussing the dangers of climate change with a colleague and had said 'Can you imagine a world without strawberries? What a disaster!'

OK, it's summer and we all like strawberries. But I didn't know they were on his mind. Or I thought I didn't. :wink2:


*This could end badly. I once ate a load of fresh strawberries late at night and next morning had sudden explosive (but painless) diarrhoea. This was on way to work, on my bike, approaching a roundabout, wearing jeans and a hi-viz running shirt.

I thought uh-oh, better nip home! and continued round the roundabout - no choice as there was traffic behind me - and let myself in through the back gate to inspect the damage in private.

It had shot up my back like a loathsome volcano, turning my shirt brown right up to the collar.

The driver following me must've seen the whole thing as they followed me home. I bet they changed their route after that.
Can I just say how much I love the description of "a loathsome volcano" :hahazebs::clap:
 
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