Fortean Headlines

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Tribble

Killjoy Boffin
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"The smitten prison guard admitted to detectives that she was "devastated" by events but still hoped that there was a chance her relationship with Warren might continue."

No more danger-sex, no more drugs being smuggled in, unemployed, in a different jail (as an inmate)... Call me cynical but I doubt he'll want a long-distance relationship.
 

CuriousIdent

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I couldn't find this posted anywhere else on here. Probably a perfectly natural explanation for it, but...

Gigantic mystery 'skeleton' found washed up on beach by Storm Ciara baffling locals - via The Mirror (but has also appeared in the Scotsman, Sun and RT.

skeleton.jpg


"A gigantic 'skeleton' was found washed up on a Scottish beach during Storm Ciara.

And locals near Aberdeen have speculated that it could be the remains of the mythical Loch Ness Monster - despite the notorious body of water being roughly 120 miles away.

The photos of the rotting carcass were posted online by Aberdeen-based community Facebook page Fubar News - hours after Storm Ciara battered Britain with 90mph winds.

Fubar News posted: "Came across this weird creature today near Aberdeen. Any ideas what it could be?"

Possible suggestions of the identity of the mysterious North sea creature were put forward - with folk saying it was a whale, orca or dolphin.

However one Facebook user said the remains actual pre-date the storm.


Lyn Crawford said: "We saw this at Blackdog I think. It was rotting when we came across it in December."

But some users joked the carcass could be the remains of Scotland's very own Loch Ness Monster.

Meg Plummer wrote: "Oh me it’s Nessie the Loch Ness monster."

But Emma –Louise Bolland disagreed that the nation's favourite folklore monster, adding: "Nessie could not adapt to salt water."

Dex Stewart meanwhile joked: "Yep it’s a very very rarely seen deep sea Haggis."

Matthew Cook was convinced it dated back to the pre-historic age, writing: "At first glance I thought a brontosaurus but looking at the vertebrae in the skeletal structure I’m swayed towards a diplodocus/triceratops."

It is not the first time people have speculated over Nessie – who was first “spotted” back in 565 AD.

Loch Ness’s native monster was mentioned in the biography of Irish monk St Columba mentions a giant "water beast" dragging a man to his death."
 

gordonrutter

There must be a set character limit to this opt...
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I couldn't find this posted anywhere else on here. Probably a perfectly natural explanation for it, but...

Gigantic mystery 'skeleton' found washed up on beach by Storm Ciara baffling locals - via The Mirror (but has also appeared in the Scotsman, Sun and RT.

View attachment 23236

"A gigantic 'skeleton' was found washed up on a Scottish beach during Storm Ciara.

And locals near Aberdeen have speculated that it could be the remains of the mythical Loch Ness Monster - despite the notorious body of water being roughly 120 miles away.

The photos of the rotting carcass were posted online by Aberdeen-based community Facebook page Fubar News - hours after Storm Ciara battered Britain with 90mph winds.

Fubar News posted: "Came across this weird creature today near Aberdeen. Any ideas what it could be?"

Possible suggestions of the identity of the mysterious North sea creature were put forward - with folk saying it was a whale, orca or dolphin.

However one Facebook user said the remains actual pre-date the storm.


Lyn Crawford said: "We saw this at Blackdog I think. It was rotting when we came across it in December."

But some users joked the carcass could be the remains of Scotland's very own Loch Ness Monster.

Meg Plummer wrote: "Oh me it’s Nessie the Loch Ness monster."

But Emma –Louise Bolland disagreed that the nation's favourite folklore monster, adding: "Nessie could not adapt to salt water."

Dex Stewart meanwhile joked: "Yep it’s a very very rarely seen deep sea Haggis."

Matthew Cook was convinced it dated back to the pre-historic age, writing: "At first glance I thought a brontosaurus but looking at the vertebrae in the skeletal structure I’m swayed towards a diplodocus/triceratops."

It is not the first time people have speculated over Nessie – who was first “spotted” back in 565 AD.

Loch Ness’s native monster was mentioned in the biography of Irish monk St Columba mentions a giant "water beast" dragging a man to his death."
Most likely a Minke Whale. I was going to go and have a look but couldn’t find a description of where exactly it is other than an Aberdeen beach, and also some people were saying it had been removed.
 

CuriousIdent

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Most likely a Minke Whale. I was going to go and have a look but couldn’t find a description of where exactly it is other than an Aberdeen beach, and also some people were saying it had been removed.

This was reported earlier in the week. There's every chance that it will have been by now. I would imagine a whale of that size being most likely.
 

IbisNibs

Exotic animal, sort of . . .
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"Through donations, Pearce and Johnny Taylor, the other leader of His Name is Flowing Oil, have made a full-time job of traveling the country with the Bible, . . ."
Oh! I wish I had a son so I could name him Flowing Oil.
 
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