Lost: Malaysia Airlines—Flight MH-370

rynner2

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Search for MH370: 'High possibility' debris from Boeing 777

Malaysia's transport minister has said there is a "high possibility" that debris found in Mozambique came from a Boeing 777, the same model as missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.
Liow Tiong Lai tweeted: "Based on early reports, high possibility debris found in Mozambique belongs to a B777".
Mr Liow said Malaysian aviation teams were working with their Australian counterparts to retrieve the debris.

MH370 disappeared in March 2014 while en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.
The aircraft and all 239 passengers remain missing.

If confirmed, the object found in Mozambique will be the second piece of known debris from the aircraft. Last year authorities found a piece of the plane's wing on the shore of Reunion island in the Indian Ocean.According to reports, the new object was discovered on a sandbank off the coast of Mozambique. NBC News said the debris was found by an American man who has been tracking the investigation into the missing flight.
Mr Liow said: "I urge everyone to avoid undue speculation as we are not able to conclude that the debris belongs to MH370 at this time."

Mozambican authorities have no information on the sighting of the object, interior ministry spokesman Inacio Dina told Reuters.

The US National Transportation Safety Board and aircraft manufacturer Boeing declined to comment.

Based on satellite communications data, MH370 is thought to have crashed in the Indian Ocean.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-35709867
 

rynner2

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MH370: head of search says 'very likely' plane will be found by July
Martin Dolan, head of the Australian authority scouring the Indian ocean, is confident aircraft will be located

Elle Hunt in Sydney
Monday 7 March 2016 03.05 GMT

The man in charge of the hunt for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 believes it is “very likely” the plane will be found in the next four months, even as the multimillion dollar search effort enters what is likely to be its final stage.

In the two years since the plane disappeared en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 227 passengers and 12 crew on board, its only confirmed trace has been a barnacle-encrusted flaperon wing that washed up on the French island of Réunion last July.
Two other pieces of flotsam, found on Réunion and Mozambique, are suspected to come from the plane, but are yet to be positively identified.

Yet Martin Dolan, the head of the Australian authority tasked with scouring an expanse of seafloor for the wreck of the aircraft, is confident it will be found this year.
Since 31 March 2014, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau has led the search effort for the plane, driven by what its investigators have always considered to be the most likely scenario – known as the “ghost flight” theory – that no-one was at the controls when the jet went down.

The ATSB’s modelling shows that, after running out of fuel, the plane would have crashed in the southern Indian ocean, off the coast of Western Australia. As of this month, four ships have searched more than 85,000sq km of a long but narrow “seventh arc”, totalling 120,000sq km of seafloor – without success.
To Dolan, that suggests that the plane is in the 30,000-odd sq km yet to be searched, and will be found when the operation concludes around July, if not before.
“It’s as likely on the last day [of the search] as on the first that the aircraft would be there. We’ve covered nearly three-quarters of the search area, and since we haven’t found the aircraft in those areas, that increases the likelihood that it’s in the areas we haven’t looked at yet.”

At this late stage, Dolan is aware that his assurance could seem like blind optimism, or a bid to save face over a US $133.3m operation – paid for by Australia and Malaysia, plus $14.8m in funding and equipment from China – that has already been said to have failed.

The search zone – twice the size of Tasmania – shows a range of places the plane could be, some higher probability than others. “We now know that there’s a range of those places the aircraft isn’t in, but that hasn’t changed the overall probability that the aircraft is in the total search area,” Dolan said.
“To eliminate that from the search – assuming we don’t find the aircraft – we have the cover the whole area.”

The complexities surrounding the search are immense: the area is six days’ sail from the nearest shore and previously unmapped, with water depths of up to 6,000m and underwater mountains, crevasses and 2,000m sheer drops. It is being covered at a rate of two knots – about walking pace.

etc...

http://www.theguardian.com/world/20...earch-says-very-likely-plane-will-be-found-by

The article also touches on a conspiracy theory that the plane was hijacked on Vladimir Putin’s instruction! :evil:
 
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Australia's transport minister says two plane parts found in Mozambique "almost certainly" came from missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370.

The two pieces of debris were found separately by members of the public and were flown to Australia for analysis.

Darren Chester said the finds were "consistent with drift modelling" of how debris from the missing plane may have been carried by ocean currents.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-...ng&ns_source=twitter&ns_linkname=news_central
 

Ermintruder

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. It is being covered at a rate of two knots – about walking pace.
There was an evocative interview comment made by an Australian Naval Commander who said something like "it's like having one man covering an area the size of Wales with a metal detector pulled on a dog-lead the length of four football pitches"
 

rynner2

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Debris gives new clues to MH370 disappearance
By Richard Westcott BBC Transport Correspondent
19 April 2016

Investigators looking for the missing Malaysian airliner, flight MH370, have identified two pieces of debris that are "almost certainly" from the plane.
Unique stencilling has been the key to identifying the parts.
The bits of debris, one from the tailplane, one from the wing flap, were found 130 miles apart on beaches in Mozambique.

The search team in Australia has now released photos that give an eerie clue to the fate of the flight.
Two pieces of text are stencilled onto the parts, one says "NO STEP", the other says "676EB". Investigators say they are clearly in the same font and design used by Malaysian Airlines.

If you look at the pictures below, you can see that the letters and numbers differ from the way they would have looked when they left Boeing's factory. The fonts are different. Plus, one was repainted a different colour and the other was in a different place.

The pieces reveal other clues too.
Both are from the right type of plane, a Boeing 777. Bear in mind that no other 777 has ever crashed in the southern hemisphere, and none has reported bits falling off.

The piece of tailplane also had a fastener on it, carrying a manufacturer's stamp (see picture). That manufacturer does not make parts for the latest 777s, but it was making them when MH370 was built. They double checked by looking at the aircraft that rolled off the production line straight afterwards, number 405. The Malaysian flight was number 404.

There is still work going on to examine all the bits of marine life found on the debris, which could give away how long they have been in the water.
But for now investigators have concluded that both these pieces are, "almost certainly from Malaysian Airlines Boeing 777 aircraft, registered 9M-MRO".

Australian experts are also checking two other pieces of flotsam found on beaches. One has a Rolls-Royce logo on and turned up in South Africa. The other was found on Rodrigues Island.
And this all comes on top of confirmation that another wing part, called a flaperon, that washed up on a beach on Reunion Island, was also from the missing plane.
All of this suggests the aircraft did crash into the sea. None of it tells us why.

Thousands of miles from where these pieces have washed up, three ships are still combing the belly of the ocean looking for the main body of the aircraft. Most of it will not have floated away.
It is tough, dangerous work in a hostile environment, searching a sea bed that makes the Alps look like a billiard table.

The sea search is due to end this summer. After that, barring new evidence, they will stop looking.
That is miserable news for families of the 239 people on board, some of whom have told me that their lives have been in limbo ever since MH370 disappeared.
Many still don't believe the aircraft crashed into the sea, they do not trust anything the authorities tell them.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-36086251
 

Peripart

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This all seems to be heading towards a conclusion now, which will hopefully go some way to explaining what happened.
 

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Breaking news that debris thought to be from Egyptair flight MS804 has been spotted WEST of Crete.
That is several hundred miles away from where the last point of contact was supposedly made just North of the Egyptian coast. Instead of preparing for a landing at Cairo, that would suggest the aircraft had started turning back towards Greece. Most odd.
 

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Looks like the debris spotted in the sea off Crete did not come from flight MS804.
Whilst the Pacific is vast and the search for Malaysia flight 370 was always going to be hugely difficult, the Mediterranean is comparatively small, is regularly overflown and has a high density of shipping traffic. Hence it does seem surprising that no trace of the Airbus has yet been found.
 
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Looks like the debris spotted in the sea off Crete did not come from flight MS804.
Whilst the Pacific is vast and the search for Malaysia flight 370 was always going to be hugely difficult, the Mediterranean is comparatively small, is regularly overflown and has a high density of shipping traffic. Hence it does seem surprising that no trace of the Airbus has yet been found.
Yeah. Naval ships and aircraft were swiftly in the general area of the disappearance. Yu would have expected something by now.
 

rynner2

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Shouldn't the last few posts be in Aviation Accidents (or even a new thread), as they have nothing to do with MH370.
 
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Probably. Was just comparing the incidents though.
Shouldn't the last few posts be in Aviation Accidents (or even a new thread), as they have nothing to do with MH370.
Some should but there is the comparative issue. I'll copy the relevant ones into Aviation Accidents. Thankfully it looks as if this wasn't a terrorist act.
 

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"Thankfully it looks as if this wasn't a terrorist act."

Not so sure. The latest reports talk of multiple smoke alerts from the cabin before the aircraft disappeared. The Airbus is a very reliable aircraft not known for spontaneous combustion, which hints at some sort of incendiary or explosive device. Unfortunately the aircraft went down in one of the deepest parts of the Mediterranean, so recovering the flight recorders may prove difficult.
 
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"Thankfully it looks as if this wasn't a terrorist act."

Not so sure. The latest reports talk of multiple smoke alerts from the cabin before the aircraft disappeared. The Airbus is a very reliable aircraft not known for spontaneous combustion, which hints at some sort of incendiary or explosive device. Unfortunately the aircraft went down in one of the deepest parts of the Mediterranean, so recovering the flight recorders may prove difficult.
Sigh. Maybe I spoke too soon.
 

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Wild weather delays completion of MH370 search

Giant waves and high winds have prevented any search operations for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 for the past month with the hunt now not expected to be complete until August, authorities said Wednesday.

Australia is leading the painstaking search for MH370 in the remote Indian Ocean, but the wild weather has not allowed the three ships involved to make any progress in recent weeks.

"Recent poor weather conditions have severely impacted search operations. The last four weeks saw no search operations undertaken," the Australian Transport Safety Bureau said in an update.

"It is now anticipated it may take until around August to complete the 120,000 square kilometres, but this will be influenced by weather conditions over the coming months, which may worsen."

So far 105,000 square kilometres (40,500 square miles) of the designated 120,000-square-kilometre seafloor search zone has been covered without success.

If nothing turns up once the area is fully scoured, the search will be abandoned, Australia, Malaysia and China -- the countries that most of the passengers came from -- have jointly said. ...

So far eight pieces of debris have been found and are presumed to have drifted thousands of kilometres (miles) from the search zone far off Western Australia's coast.

Five of them have been identified as definitely or probably from the Boeing 777, with three others discovered last month still being examined.
SOURCE: https://www.yahoo.com/news/wild-weather-delays-completion-mh370-search-071113884.html
 

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MH370 search: New debris found on Madagascar beach

New pieces of debris have been found in Madagascar by a man searching for parts of missing flight MH370.

Blaine Gibson, who has already found possible debris in Mozambique, made the latest discovery on the east coast of Madagascar.

One of the parts resembles an aeroplane seat part. Mr Gibson has sent images of the finds to investigators. ....
Full Story: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-36495617
 

rynner2

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MH370 search: Photos of possible personal items released
By Richard Westcott BBC Transport Correspondent

Campaigners for families of those on board missing flight MH370 have released photographs of personal items that washed up on a Madagascar beach, hoping to identify them.

Some 20 items found include purses, backpacks and part of a laptop case.
There are no labels identifying them as belonging to the 239 people on board the jet that vanished two years ago.
The items were found by US lawyer Blaine Gibson, who concedes they may be irrelevant in the hunt for MH370.
"They may have just fallen off a ship," Mr Gibson told the BBC.
"Still, I found them on the same 18km (11-mile) stretch of beach where I found suspected aircraft parts [of the Malaysia Airlines jet] so it is important that they are investigated properly."

MH370 was flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in March 2014 and is presumed to have crashed into the southern Indian Ocean after veering off course.

The personal items found include a white, black and red "Angry Bird" purse, a tartan handbag and part of a black laptop case inscribed with the letters "MENSA".
Mr Gibson, who has has funded his own search for MH370 debris in east Africa, found them earlier in June on Riake beach, on the island of Nosy Boraha in north-east Madagascar.

As well as the personal items, he also found two pieces of debris that may be from the aircraft itself.
He recently found three pieces of debris in that area, having already found another piece of debris in Mozambique in March, which Australian investigators believe is almost certainly part of the missing plane.

Campaigners have released the images on the Aircrash Support Group Australia website to ascertain whether they may have belonged to MH370 passengers.
The group's chair, Sheryl Keen, said the images were being posted "to make sure everyone has the right and opportunity to view these items".
"The nature of aviation investigations [means] usually people don't get to see the nitty gritty of it. But because these have been found by members of the public we're able to take this opportunity to display the objects," Ms Keen said.

Speaking by phone in Madagascar, Blaine Gibson told the BBC that a Malaysian investigator was due on the island to collect the pieces, but the investigator's trip was cancelled at the last minute by his superior. "We don't know why," Mr Gibson said.

Now the families have taken things into their own hands by releasing the images.
Relatives of those on board the plane have expressed frustration at the official investigation into MH370's disappearance.
KS Narendran said that while none of the personal items found belonged to his wife, MH370 passenger Chandrika Sharma, investigators' lack of urgency was disconcerting.
"We don't sense any sense of urgency at any level," he told the BBC from his home in Chennai.
"So what choice do families have but to pull together and help whoever they can?"
He said the current search does not include the only areas of the world where pieces of the aircraft have actually been washed up - beaches on the Indian ocean, thousands of miles from the official underwater sea search.

Australia, Malaysia and China have nearly completed a search of 120,000 sq km (46,000 sq miles) of the Indian Ocean, using underwater drones and sonar equipment deployed from specialist ships.
All the debris is being examined in Australia by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau and other experts.
But the countries involved have agreed the sea search will end in the next couple of months unless "credible new information" is found.
...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-36571822
 

rynner2

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Oh Hell..!
MH370 search team: 'We've been looking for the missing plane in the wrong place'
Reuters
21 July 2016 • 12:48pm

earchers at the Dutch company leading the underwater hunt for Malaysia Airlines jet MH370 say they believe the plane may have glided down rather than dived in the final moments, meaning they have been scouring the wrong patch of ocean for two years.
Flight MH370 disappeared in March 2014 with 239 passengers and crew en route to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur. Searchers led by engineering group Fugro have been combing an area roughly the size of Greece for two years.

That search, over 120,000 square kilometres of the southern Indian Ocean off Western Australia, is expected to end in three months and could be called off after that following a meeting of key countries Malaysia, China and Australia on Friday. So far, nothing has been found.

If it's not there, it means it's somewhere else," Fugro project director Paul Kennedy told Reuters.

While Mr Kennedy does not exclude extreme possibilities that could have made the plane impossible to spot in the search zone, he and his team argue a more likely option is the plane glided down - meaning it was manned at the end - and made it beyond the area marked out by calculations from satellite images.
"If it was manned it could glide for a long way," Mr Kennedy said. "You could glide it for further than our search area is, so I believe the logical conclusion will be well maybe that is the other scenario."

Doubts that the search teams are looking in the right place are likely to fuel calls for all data to be made publicly available so that academics and rival companies can pursue an "open source" solution - a collaborative public answer to the mystery.

Fugro's controlled glide hypothesis is also the first time officials have lent some support to contested theories that someone was in control during the flight's final moments.
Since the crash there have been competing theories over whether one, both or no pilots were in control, whether it was hijacked - or whether all aboard perished and the plane was not controlled at all when it hit the water. Adding to the mystery, investigators believe someone may have deliberately switched off the plane's transponder before diverting it thousands of miles.

However, the glide hypothesis is not supported by the investigating agencies: America's Boeing Co, France's Thales SA, U.S. investigator the National Transportation Safety Board, British satellite company Inmarsat PLC, the UK Air Accidents Investigation Branch and the Australian Defence Science and Technology Organisation.

The meeting between officials from China, Australia and Malaysia is expected to discuss the future of the search. The three governments have previously agreed that unless any new credible evidence arises the search would not be extended, despite calls from victims' families.

Any further search would require a fresh round of funding from the three governments on top of the almost A$180 million ($137 million) that has already been spent, making it the most expensive in aviation history.
Deciding the search area in 2014, authorities assumed the plane had no "inputs" during its final descent, meaning there was no pilot or no conscious pilot. They believe it was on auto-pilot and spiralled down when it ran out of fuel.

But Mr Kennedy said a skilled pilot could glide the plane approximately 120 miles (193 km) from its cruising altitude after running out of fuel. One pilot told Reuters it would be slightly less than that.
For the aircraft to continue gliding after fuel has run out, someone must manually put the aircraft into a glide - nose down with controlled speed.

"If you lose all power, the auto-pilot kicks out. If there is nobody at the controls, the aircraft will plummet down," said a captain with experience of flying Boeing 777s - the same as MH370. Like all pilots interviewed for this story, he declined to be named given the controversy around the lost jet.

Fugro works on a "confidence level" of 95 per cent, a statistical measurement used, in Fugro's case, to indicate how certain the plane debris was not in the area they have already combed, a seabed peppered with steep cliffs and underwater volcanoes.

"The end-of-flight scenarios are absolutely endless," Fugro managing director Steve Duffield said. "Which wing ran out of fuel first, did it roll this way or did it tip that way?"

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB), the agency coordinating the search, has consistently defended the defined search zone. It did not immediately respond to questions over whether it was assessing the controlled glide theory.
Authorities used data provided by Inmarsat to locate the likely plunge point through communication between the plane and satellite ground station.
"All survey data collected from the search for missing flight MH370 will be released," an ATSB spokesman said.

etc...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...ng-in-the-wrong-place-mh370-search-team-says/
 

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Exclusive: MH370 Pilot Flew a Suicide Route on His Home Simulator Closely Matching Final Flight

New York has obtained a confidential document from the Malaysian police investigation into the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 that shows that the plane’s captain, Zaharie Ahmad Shah, conducted a simulated flight deep into the remote southern Indian Ocean less than a month before the plane vanished under uncannily similar circumstances. The revelation, which Malaysia withheld from a lengthy public report on the investigation, is the strongest evidence yet that Zaharie made off with the plane in a premeditated act of mass murder-suicide.
http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2016/07/mh370-pilot-flew-suicide-route-on-home-simulator.html
 

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Malaysia said on Thursday that a large piece of aircraft debris discovered on the island of Pemba, off the coast of Tanzania, in June, was from the missing Malaysia Airlines jet MH370. ...

The debris, an outboard flap, will be examined further to see if it can yield any insight into the circumstances around the missing plane, Malaysian Transport Minister Liow Tiong Lai said in a statement.
SOURCE: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-malaysia-airlines-tanzania-idUSKCN11L13G

(Multiple photos of the piece are accessible at the source URL.)
 

rynner2

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MH370 search: Photos of possible personal items released
By Richard Westcott BBC Transport Correspondent

Campaigners for families of those on board missing flight MH370 have released photographs of personal items that washed up on a Madagascar beach, hoping to identify them.

Some 20 items found include purses, backpacks and part of a laptop case.
There are no labels identifying them as belonging to the 239 people on board the jet that vanished two years ago.
The items were found by US lawyer Blaine Gibson, who concedes they may be irrelevant in the hunt for MH370.
"They may have just fallen off a ship," Mr Gibson told the BBC.
"Still, I found them on the same 18km (11-mile) stretch of beach where I found suspected aircraft parts [of the Malaysia Airlines jet] so it is important that they are investigated properly."

MH370 was flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in March 2014 and is presumed to have crashed into the southern Indian Ocean after veering off course.

The personal items found include a white, black and red "Angry Bird" purse, a tartan handbag and part of a black laptop case inscribed with the letters "MENSA".
Mr Gibson, who has has funded his own search for MH370 debris in east Africa, found them earlier in June on Riake beach, on the island of Nosy Boraha in north-east Madagascar.

As well as the personal items, he also found two pieces of debris that may be from the aircraft itself.
He recently found three pieces of debris in that area, having already found another piece of debris in Mozambique in March, which Australian investigators believe is almost certainly part of the missing plane.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-36571822
For some reason the Guardian now devotes a whole article to Blaine Gibson:
The man on a solo mission to find the wreckage of flight MH370
Blaine Alan Gibson is a lawyer and amateur ‘adventurer’ who is on a self-funded quest to trace the
Malaysia Airlines plane that vanished in 2014
Elle Hunt
Monday 26 September 2016 13.45 BST

...
Even allowing for misses, Gibson’s successes have been remarkable, especially given his lack of professional expertise and resources. He has no prior aviation experience, although he says he is learning. “I know now what pieces of a plane look like. I’ve probably held in my hands more pieces of Malaysia 370 since it crashed than anyone alive.”
...

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2...-mission-to-find-the-wreckage-of-flight-mh370

 

rynner2

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MH370: Report suggests flight was not preparing for landing

Wreckage analysis suggests Flight MH370 did not make a controlled descent into the Indian Ocean, says a new report.
The Boeing 777 disappeared while flying to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur with 239 people on board in March 2014.

The report from Australian investigators suggests the aircraft's wing flaps were in a "cruise" position when it hit the ocean surface.
It casts further doubt on the theory supported by some analysts that someone was in control of the plane's descent.

Among more than 20 items of debris, investigators focused their attention on the recovered right outboard wing flap section.
"The purpose of the examination was to inform the end-of-flight scenarios being considered by the search team," the report said.
"The right flaperon was probably at, or close to, the neutral position at the time it separated from the wing."

The release of the report comes as a team of international aviation and communications experts gather in Canberra to discuss the next stage of the search process.
The report from the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB), which is co-ordinating the search, is based on satellite data, flight simulations and a comprehensive analysis of debris which had drifted from the suspected crash site.

"Findings of the review will be released after the meeting," Transport Minister Darren Chester said in a statement.
"Australia, Malaysia, and China continue to work together to find MH370."

The search effort for MH370 has been combing a 120,000sq km area of seabed using underwater drones and sonar equipment deployed from specialist ships.
It is expected to draw to a close by the end of the year if it does not find credible new evidence.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-37843752
 

rynner2

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MH370: Plane 'not likely to be in search area', say investigators

Experts leading the hunt for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 have said the plane is unlikely to be found in the current search area, and recommended looking further north.

No trace of the plane has been recovered in the southern Indian Ocean, after more than two years of searching.

MH370 disappeared while flying to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur with 239 people on board in 2014.

With the search to end soon, Australian officials say it will not be extended.
Australia's Transport Minister Darren Chester said the search would be unlikely to go beyond the scheduled end of January or February 2017 as the report does not give a "specific location" for the aircraft.
The governments of Australia, Malaysia and China, who are funding the search, had previously agreed that "we will be suspending the search unless credible evidence is available" that identifies the location, he said.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB), tasked to coordinate the search, convened a review with a multi-national team of aviation and science experts in November.
Its latest report, based on that meeting, said "there is a high degree of confidence that the previously identified underwater area searched to date does not contain the missing aircraft".

Search vessels have been looking in a 120,000 sq km (46,332 sq miles) part of the southern Indian Ocean.
Experts identified a new area of approximately 25,000 sq km to the north of the current search area that had the "highest probability" of containing the wreckage.
"The participants of the First Principles Review were in agreement on the need to search an additional area representing approximately 25,000 km²".
This was the last area the plane could possibly be located, given current evidence, the report said.
Their conclusion was based on new flight simulations and analysis of satellite communications, as well as drift modelling patterns based on the timing and locations of the discovery of debris.

Some debris pieces confirmed to be from MH370 have been found along the African coast and islands in the Indian Ocean by private citizens in recent months.
The experts also said the plane was on an "unstable flight path" and that its wing flaps were in a retracted position, in line with earlier findings by the ATSB that the plane made a "rapid and uncontrolled descent".
The ATSB said it had presented the recommendation to the Malaysian, Chinese and Australian governments.

Only one vessel is left searching for the plane in the current search area.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-38375357
 

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The scale and mechanism for this search has been likened to someone cutting a sequence of lawns (each the size of Wales) with a mower hanging on the end of a half-mile bungee cord, whilst reversing a Ford van at 10 miles an hour in the rain.
 

rynner2

Gone But Not Forgotten
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Flight MH370: Search for vanished airliner suspended

The search for the Malaysian airliner that disappeared three years ago with 239 on board has been suspended.
In a statement, Australia, Malaysia and China said the decision was taken with "sadness" after a fruitless search in more than 120,000 sq km (46,300 miles) of the Indian Ocean.
They remained hopeful new information would enable the aircraft to be found in the future.

The Boeing 777 vanished while flying to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur in 2014.
So far only seven of the 20 pieces of recovered debris have been identified as definitely or highly likely to be from the missing plane.

A report in November 2016 said the plane probably made a "high and increasing rate of descent" into the Indian Ocean.
"Whilst combined scientific studies have continued to refine areas of probability, to date no new information has been discovered to determine the specific location of the aircraft," Tuesday's joint statement said.

"We remain hopeful that new information will come to light and that at some point in the future the aircraft will be located."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-38647365
 

Coastaljames

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Think I mentioned earlier on this thread but a close friend of my wife and I, Chandrika was on this flight.

The other morning my wife woke up to tell me that she had dreamt of Chandrika. My wife told me that she gave was smiling and she said she was fine. That it had been hard but things were better now. She was at peace and safe.
 
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