Necrolog (Deaths Of Folks Who Had Impact On The Fortean World)

ramonmercado

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Top Cryptozoology Deaths of 2016
by Loren Coleman, Cryptozoology A to Z.
Director, International Cryptozoology Museum

In 2016, we appeared to be visited by one of the worst of marauding Death Angels to be remembered in recent years. Many notables left this plane, and the suffering by the loved ones was felt widely. This was true also due to the recently departed from the fields of cryptozoology, hominology and Bigfoot hunting, in general. Many deaths touched many.



At the end of this year, the mainstream reviews of 2016 will reflect on the apparently unusual number of high profile deaths that occurred during the past 12 months. We may wish to consider the cluster of Bigfoot-cryptozoology investigator passings as significant too. During 2016, the news of the deaths of John Green, Mark A. Hall, Smokey Crabtree, Barry Blount, Ed Bousfield, Thomas Scott Ruh, Mary Green and several local investigators were startling to behold. ...

http://www.cryptozoonews.com/deaths-2016/
 

Naughty_Felid

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The Man Who First Saw "The Men in Black" Dies





The man who brought the ufo silencers, the men in dark clothing, into modern consciousness, Albert K. Bender, 94, died on March 29, 2016, in California.

"Men in Black" (MIBs) are what appear to be male humans dressed in black suits who claim to be government or paramilitary (or even alien) agents and who harass or threaten UFO witnesses to keep them quiet about what they have seen.

From portrayals in The X-Files, appearances in movies, references in popular culture and points of debate in UFO conspiracy theories, the MIBs have become part of our 21st Century culture.
In April 1952, Albert K. Bender, a factory worker from Bridgeport, Connecticut, announced the formation of International Flying Saucer Bureau (IFSB), whose purpose was to "gather flying saucer information" and to "get all Flying Saucer minded people acquainted with each other...."

At the time he established the IFSB, Bender was a 31-year-old bachelor who lived with his stepfather. He was obsessed not only with UFOs but with occultism, horror movies, and science fiction. Bender transformed his part of the house into what he called a "chamber of horrors." Jerome Clark, The Emergence of a Phenomenon: UFOs from the Beginning through 1959 ~ The UFO Encyclopedia - Volume 2 (Chicago: Omnigraphics, 1992: 73)
Ufology historian Jerry Clark told of how Bender took "out-of-body trips into deep space," but also worked hard on the IFSB's publication, Space Review. Bender built up the 1952-1953 membership to 1500 people from around the world. "One of the most active was a West Virginia man named Gray Barker."

In early September 1953, Bender, who is acknowledged as one of the first pioneers of UFO research, was visited at his home in Bridgeport, Connecticut, by three men dressed in black who warned him in threatening terms to cease his investigations or else. ...

http://copycateffect.blogspot.ie/2016/04/Bender-obit.html
So they finally got him? The bastards :mad:
 

Mythopoeika

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Ohhh shit. I Googled him and looked at his Wikipedia entry just the other day. :eek:
The synchronicity is spooking me.
 

Frideswide

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Ohhh shit. I Googled him and looked at his Wikipedia entry just the other day. :eek:
The synchronicity is spooking me.
stop it! stop googling people! Bad Mytho! ;)
 

Fluttermoth

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My son and I were discussing U2 the other day; isn't odd how they can sell out these massive stadiums, but neither of us has ever met anyone who really likes them.

Where do all the U2 fans hide?
 

Swifty

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My son and I were discussing U2 the other day; isn't odd how they can sell out these massive stadiums, but neither of us has ever met anyone who really likes them.

Where do all the U2 fans hide?
America mostly ... same as fans of Sting ..
 

Spudrick68

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I loved Henry Rollins early spoken word rant at Bono. I have copied a clip of it here:
.
 

Ulalume

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America mostly ... same as fans of Sting ..
Excuuuuse me! I've never known a single person who liked U2 after 1983. Or Sting's solo work, for that matter. Well, maybe a few people liked The Joshua Tree, but they wouldn't dare admit to it now. Bono's reputation as a sanctimonious prat is retroactive.
 

Swifty

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Excuuuuse me! I've never known a single person who liked U2 after 1983. Or Sting's solo work, for that matter. Well, maybe a few people liked The Joshua Tree, but they wouldn't dare admit to it now. Bono's reputation as a sanctimonious prat is retroactive.
Sorry then, I'm clearly confusing the early 90's with nowadays Ulalume :p ..
 

hunck

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You're most welcome.
 

Ermintruder

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Landau was an excellent understated Commander Koenig. For me, anything else he did was just secondary to that.

The whole Space:1999 style, of an edgy unhurried/unexaggerated grandeur, was either set by him, or he just knew exactly how the role had to be played.

I think that both the series, and Landau, deserve much more acclaim and credit than they have received so far.

I always had the impression that Space:1999, as offered to us, was like one amazing chocolate from a box we could never properly investigate. Dark, deeper layers were hinted at, as were sweeter highlights...but as with much in the series (and with Landau) plenty was confidently-implied and left to your imagination.

Is it death that gives a meaning to life in the end?
If there is an end...


This is Moonbase Alpha out...
 

Bigphoot2

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Another familiar face gone
Mission: Impossible star Landau dies
Image copyrightREUTERS
Image captionMr Landau died after "unexpected complications" from a hospital visit
The actor Martin Landau, best known for roles in the TV series Mission: Impossible and 1960s blockbusters like Cleopatra, has died, aged 89.

His publicist Dick Guttman confirmed the death, saying: "We are overcome with sadness."

Mr Landau won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar in 1995 for portraying the horror movie star Bela Lugosi in Ed Wood.

He died on Saturday in Los Angeles of "unexpected complications" following a hospital visit.
etc
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-40627982
 

Vardoger

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I was growing up with M.L. on the Space 1999 show, called Månbas Alpha on Swedish television. Must have been 9 or 10 y.o. when the show was aired.
 

GNC

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Martin Landau was a stalwart of science fiction and horror, and made a lot of cheapo examples in his wilderness years, but I too first knew him as Commander Koenig, and he won an Oscar for a brilliant performance as Bela Lugosi, another psychotronic star who had his wilderness years but unlike Landau never recovered from them. Landau was also nearly Mr Spock on Star Trek! RIP.
 
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