Nuclear-Era Civil Defence Measures In The UK

FelixAntonius

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Aug 8, 2001
Messages
1,138
Likes
121
Points
94
#2
Oh God!!!!

This is the sort of c**p that got sent out in the 1960's & 70's.

What realy p***es me off, was there were lots of people of my age, who thought there was no point in considering or planning for the future, as it was all going to end in a few years in nucler war!!!!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#4
You'd be aswell hide under the bloody thing as read it...
Anyone ever see 'When the Wind Blows'?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#5
U could always fight ur way in the Big T's shelter under white hall that they built while we were "tightening our belts" (cost 165 mill).......
 

rynner2

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Aug 7, 2001
Messages
55,238
Likes
9,001
Points
284
#6
Apparently The Dome cost us 28 mill last year, just sitting there doing nothing.

Perhaps it has secret protective properties against Nuclear attack...?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#7
Victor Lewis-Smith managed to preserve some real gems, old long-forgotten public information films. One of them was from the late sixties (approx) and casually informed the viewer that if you're caught outside during a nuclear attack to shelter under a tree, and if you get any fall out on you to brush it off as quickly as possible.
 

TheOriginalCujo

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Jul 27, 2001
Messages
849
Likes
16
Points
49
#8
Inverurie Jones said:
You'd be aswell hide under the bloody thing as read it...
Anyone ever see 'When the Wind Blows'?
Yes and I still think it's one of the most terrifying things ever shown on terrestrial television.

Cujo
 

ogopogo3

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Oct 25, 2001
Messages
1,375
Likes
17
Points
69
#9
Truly the most depressing nuclear holocaust movie has got to be the UK film THREADS.

In fact, that is the most depressing movie I've EVER seen. It makes THE DAY AFTER look like a Norman Rockwell painting.

http://us.imdb.com/Title?0090163
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#10
I remember seeing these booklets first time round. Where I live Edinburgh Council countered them with a leaflet that they put in all the public libraries. I remember that it had a picture of a devastated city on the front and it said that after a nuclear war 'the living would envy the dead.'

And speaking of those public information films from the 60s and 70s Headpress did a big article on them in their print mag a while back. The one that warned children about not playing near water (it had that bloke in the monk's cowl and you saw the robes being thrown into the water and sinking at the end) scared me witless as a kid. Don't know if it worked but I've always been too frightened of water to learn how to swim.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#11
Just out of curiosity, are there any nuclear bunkers in the north of england that are currently still active? The nearest thing to me is a disused nuclear monitoring outpost which sits at the top of the highest point in my area over looking preston. I was just wondering if there were any major ones still going around here. Any ideas?

Thanks
Jim
 

techybloke666

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Mar 9, 2005
Messages
2,630
Likes
3
Points
54
#12
Why the hell would you need to know where they were ?

Do you know something we dont Jim ?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#13
Ooops you've got me now. Was planning to try and escape the upcoming apocalypse...ahem...anyway I just noticed that, according to past threads, the south seems to be clogged full of nuclear bunkers whether they are still are use or not, and I just wondered if the north had any. Plus I want to knock on the doors and ask if they have room for one more when the bombs fall :)
 

naSTEe

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Jul 24, 2002
Messages
134
Likes
0
Points
47
#14

techybloke666

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Mar 9, 2005
Messages
2,630
Likes
3
Points
54
#15
Ooops you've got me now. Was planning to try and escape the upcoming apocalypse...ahem...anyway I just noticed that, according to past threads, the south seems to be clogged full of nuclear bunkers whether they are still are use or not, and I just wondered if the north had any. Plus I want to knock on the doors and ask if they have room for one more when the bombs fall
no point in bombing the north west mate it already looks like it has been Dresdenized

Best to move somewhere quiet anyway
Newzeland's good
 

chockfullahate

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Oct 29, 2001
Messages
418
Likes
7
Points
49
#16
apparently there is a bunker at speke airport, so someone who worked there told me.
 

MrSnowman

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Aug 5, 2002
Messages
875
Likes
13
Points
49
#19
Most town halls and civic centres have nuclear bunkers. Well, of sorts. The vast majority of them were decommissioned at the end of the Cold War and turned into storage areas as far as I know, but in the event of a surprise nuclear war, I'm sure they'd still be useable.
 

oldrover

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Oct 18, 2009
Messages
3,948
Likes
1,369
Points
169
#20
Got a good first hand tip today that there's an abandoned bunker about half a mile from where I work.

One of my co workers told that he'd visited it a day or so ago it's open and you can just walk in. He grew up in the area and as a kid was cycling past when a hatch opened in the field he was passing and a 'man in a cap' emerged from the ground with a lot of weak explanations for what he was doing.

Interestingly it can only be about two miles from what was a known, or known in local gossip at any rate, to be a strategic target the DVLA headquarters supposedly because of its computing/communication potential.

Anyway I'm going to get more info and visit, I've always wanted to see one of these. If that is what it is.
 

Cherrybomb

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Aug 26, 2009
Messages
1,341
Likes
607
Points
129
Location
Sitting on the roof, at dusk.
#21
I was told a few years back that power sub-stations have small bunkers under them. Anyone else know of this? I just chalked it up to hocum, but I guess it would be a fairly safe place to hide.
 

oldrover

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Oct 18, 2009
Messages
3,948
Likes
1,369
Points
169
#22
One thing I've found out about nuclear bunkers recently is that they're absolutely everywhere. Especially this mini sort;

http://www.subbrit.org.uk/rsg/roc/db/987584526.html

This is the one I heard about in work, and is about ten miles from where I live
I find though that there are quite a few closer again.

If you want to find out where yours are, or other bigger plusher bunkers near you, you can find out here;

http://www.subbrit.org.uk/

Either by searching by location or category.
 

Anonymous-50446

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Jun 27, 2015
Messages
8,865
Likes
10,814
Points
279
#27

Krepostnoi

Viva la Quinta Brigada
Joined
Jul 9, 2012
Messages
2,992
Likes
5,697
Points
209
#28
Do we have anyone here who was in the Royal Observer Corps? There's a tremendously sad recruiting film out there on Youtube somewhere - which I was directed to by @taras - which plays heavily on the fact that there are tremendous social opportunities to be had by joining the ROC - the subtext there is perhaps not one that might have recruits flocking to join. So that's one element of sadness, in the more modern sense, but there is also an odd coda, given that the thing sets out as a recruitment film, which states that the Corps was stood down in 1991, and a truly bizarre cod-heroic allusion to the stalwart members remaining ready to answer the call in the nation's hour of need, as though they were Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table slumbering under a hill somewhere.


Please note, it's the editing decisions taken around that film which I find questionable. I don't mean to mock the actual Corps members, who signed up for an unsung but brave role. In fact, I have so many questions about the job they were meant to do if it did all kick off: how long were they supposed to stay at the monitoring stations? What were they supposed to do afterwards? etc. etc. I have spoken to a former Vulcan rigger, who told me his plan would have been to remain at his post with a cigarette on once the bombers had departed. He wouldn't have made it very far in the four minutes or so it was reckoned they would have had left, so what would have been the point of working up a sweat? I suspect that, in contrast to the many poor sods who didn't have a fast ride out of RAF Finningley, for many Observers, the end would have come with a whimper, not a bang, and still the reality would have been very different from official guidance. I am curious to know what that guidance said. I recall that in the War Game, the narrator reads out, dead-pan over scenes of chaos, the planned menus that field kitchens were supposed to rustle up for the survivors: substantial meals of meat and veg with pudding and custard for dessert. That tension between what the authors must have known and what they wrote down fascinates me unduly.
 

Yithian

Parish Watch
Staff member
Joined
Oct 29, 2002
Messages
27,585
Likes
29,715
Points
309
Location
East of Suez
#29
Do we have anyone here who was in the Royal Observer Corps? There's a tremendously sad recruiting film out there on Youtube somewhere - which I was directed to by @taras - which plays heavily on the fact that there are tremendous social opportunities to be had by joining the ROC - the subtext there is perhaps not one that might have recruits flocking to join. So that's one element of sadness, in the more modern sense, but there is also an odd coda, given that the thing sets out as a recruitment film, which states that the Corps was stood down in 1991, and a truly bizarre cod-heroic allusion to the stalwart members remaining ready to answer the call in the nation's hour of need, as though they were Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table slumbering under a hill somewhere.


Please note, it's the editing decisions taken around that film which I find questionable. I don't mean to mock the actual Corps members, who signed up for an unsung but brave role. In fact, I have so many questions about the job they were meant to do if it did all kick off: how long were they supposed to stay at the monitoring stations? What were they supposed to do afterwards? etc. etc. I have spoken to a former Vulcan rigger, who told me his plan would have been to remain at his post with a cigarette on once the bombers had departed. He wouldn't have made it very far in the four minutes or so it was reckoned they would have had left, so what would have been the point of working up a sweat? I suspect that, in contrast to the many poor sods who didn't have a fast ride out of RAF Finningley, for many Observers, the end would have come with a whimper, not a bang, and still the reality would have been very different from official guidance. I am curious to know what that guidance said. I recall that in the War Game, the narrator reads out, dead-pan over scenes of chaos, the planned menus that field kitchens were supposed to rustle up for the survivors: substantial meals of meat and veg with pudding and custard for dessert. That tension between what the authors must have known and what they wrote down fascinates me unduly.
Have you hotlinked something? The media embed is not loading for me.
 

Krepostnoi

Viva la Quinta Brigada
Joined
Jul 9, 2012
Messages
2,992
Likes
5,697
Points
209
#30
Have you hotlinked something? The media embed is not loading for me.
Tried to use what I thought was a kosher forum function: "insert media", using the Youtube URL. This one:
NB I can see the embedded clip in my post, functioning as expected. Apologies if this in fact counts as hotlinking and is thus frowned upon.

ETA The forum has just automagically transformed the URL. Let me try again: youtube.com/watch?v=xiepfG7IKRo&feature=youtu.be with https://www. where you might expect it at the start.
 
Top