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Quoting A Post In A Different Thread?

Spookdaddy

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May 24, 2006
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I was just wondering if there is any sort of protocol in regard to quoting a post in a different thread to the one it originally appears in.

Some general threads have posts in them which are relevant to more specifically focussed ones. The general threads tend to trundle on like juggernauts, the more nuanced ones often fall by the wayside. I think this is a shame, as the concentration on one particular theme or aspect can be very productive.

As a specific example, Dick Turpin recently posted a really great story in the Anyone Seen a Ghost? thread, which would be very relevant to Weird Things That Have Multiple Witnesses?; the former is 30 pages long, and fascinating - the latter 3, but also fascinating.

I'm not suggesting that the big threads are a problem - far from it, they are often enthralling. But their ubiquity maybe attracts tales at the expense of other corners of the board that are well worth nurturing.

In my experience I've found that links can break, and also that following multiple links from an original source can be messy and distracting - so I'm thinking a full quote of the original post.

I'm not looking at this from some sort of pedantic organisational viewpoint, but as a potential way of breathing life into threads less visited, but equally deserving - and by extension, maybe maintaining the health of the board in general.

So, is this a rubbish idea? Any protocols involved: should you maybe ask the author of the post if they are okay with it? As I can't see this happening that often, I can't imagine it would be a bloat issue - but are there any other issues involved?
 
Yes, it's a good idea. I sometimes do this when editing / merging / re-arranging threads.

You already have the ability to do this. It can be done in 2 different ways that will preserve the backward link to the original place where the quoted poster posted the quoted text.

One way is more convenient, but may not always work (depending on your device and browser).

The second way is a bit more involved, but will always work.

Here are the 2 approaches illustrated with respect to quoting something from its original location (Post 0 in Thread 0) in another location (Post X in Thread Y)

Method A: The Convenient Approach

Go to the post you wish to quote (Post 0 in Thread 0).

Click on the Quote link at the lower right (" +Quote ").

This copies the content of Post 0 into a temporary snippet.

Go to the place (Thread Y) where you'd like to quote Post 0 from Thread 0.

Scroll down to the text entry box at the bottom of the page (where you enter a new post).

Click on the "insert Quotes" button / link.

Select the quote from Post 0 / Thread 0 to enter it in your new post.

Method B: The Bulletproof Approach

Go to the post you wish to quote (Post 0 in Thread 0).

Click on the "Reply" link. This will automatically quote all of Post 0 in your text entry box.

Edit the quoted content if desired, but don't touch the Quote tags and text within brackets at either end of the quoted text.

Select and copy the entire quoted text you're ready to transplant (including the tags). NOTE: I always immediately paste this captured quote into a text editor or notepad app off to the side, so it doesn't get lost in the mean time.

Go to the place (Thread Y) where you'd like to quote Post 0 from Thread 0.

Scroll down to the text entry box at the bottom of the page (where you enter a new post).

Paste the copied quote (tags and all) into the text entry box.

Insert any text / comments of your own*, and post the result to Thread Y.

*NOTE: It's wise to mention you're quoting something from another thread, so as to avoid confusing readers.

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In both cases, the backward link to the original post being quoted is preserved. This link keys on the earlier post's index number, so the quoted text's original location is automatically carried along through the transplant procedure.
 
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