Roman Britain: New Findings & Discoveries

ramonmercado

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Lucky horseshoes find

Early Roman "horseshoes" unearthed during an excavation at a fort near Hadrian's Wall are to go on display.

Barbara Birley, curator at Vindolanda, near Hexham, in Northumberland, said it was "incredibly rare" to find a full set of four iron hipposandals.

She said the hoof protectors were so well preserved that their tread to stop horses slipping was clearly visible.

The haul was found by a volunteer - one of 250 who carry out digs at the fort every year.




https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-tyne-45034623
 

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Roman town found in Kent

Remains of one of the most significant small Roman towns in Kent have been found on a building site, with a temple and evidence of a pottery.

Experts have uncovered the 18-acre town on land destined for houses, which are being built by developer Persimmon Homes, next to the A2 in Newington, near Sittingbourne.

Archaeologists said it is one of the most significant finds. Among it were rare coins, jewellery, furnaces and a seven-metre wide road thought to be an alternative route to the A2.

"We already had evidence of a Roman burial ground and Roman occupation in the immediate vicinity and this excavation shows there was a thriving manufacturing site in the heart of our village.

"The temple and major road are massive discoveries.

"It proves the A2 wasn't the only Roman road through the village.

Archaeological director at Swale and Thames Archaeological Survey, Dr Paul Wilkinson, said: "This is one of the most important discoveries of a Roman small town in Kent for many years with the preservation of Roman buildings and artefacts exceptional."
It will soon be buried under a housing development.





 

ramonmercado

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A rare 2,000-year-old wooden arm has been recovered from the bottom of a Roman well.

The "finely carved" limb was found by archaeologists excavating land at the Warth Park industrial estate in Raunds, Northamptonshire. Experts believed the discovery is of national and international importance, because of its location - and survival. Wood specialist Michael Bamforth said it may have been an offering to the gods.

Archaeologists from Oxford Archaeology East said the arm survived in the water-logged well as it had been filled in at the top so a lack of oxygen prevented deterioration.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-northamptonshire-48712130
 

ramonmercado

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Gems, games and a Roman Bigfoot (for the time).

Two rare Roman gemstones that had fallen down a toilet and a 2,000 year-old gaming board have been unearthed at a Northumberland fort.

The treasures found at Vindolanda in Hexham, near Hadrian's Wall, were dug up by a team of 400 volunteers and have been sent for analysis.

As well as the 1,800-year-old gems, a soldier's size 11 shoe was also found.

A trust spokesman said the gems were precious but the glue used to fix them in rings was not strong enough.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-tyne-48745656
 

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Rynner toiled in that mine.

Archaeologists digging near a Roman fort in Cornwall have unearthed remains of a mine and a Roman road.

The discoveries were made during a new dig near a fort found at Calstock in 2007, one of only three such sites known in the county.

Experts will carry out further analysis of a previously-unknown series of deep pits, connected by arched tunnels.

Dig leader Dr Chris Smart, from the University of Exeter, said the mine was an "unexpected bonus".

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-cornwall-48841598
 

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This is a different sort of find - a humorous souvenir from two millennia ago ...
Ancient Roman 'Pen' Was a Joke Souvenir

The tradition of buying cheap, joke souvenirs for your loved ones while traveling dates back at least two millennia.

During an archaeological excavation at a Roman-era site in London, researchers found around 200 iron styluses used for writing on wax-filled wooden tablets. One of those styluses, which just debuted in its first public exhibition, holds a message written in tiny lettering along its sides. The inscription's sentiment, according to the researchers who translated it, is essentially, "I went to Rome and all I got you was this pen."

Roger Tomlin, a classicist and epigrapher at the University of Oxford, translated the full inscription as follows:

"I have come from the City. I bring you a welcome gift
with a sharp point that you may remember me.
I ask, if fortune allowed, that I might be able (to give)
as generously as the way is long (and) as my purse is empty."

The researchers said the "the City" in the inscription likely refers to Rome. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.livescience.com/66066-ancient-roman-pen-was-joke-souvenir.html
 

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You just got her hand if you won the race?

A Roman mosaic has been fully uncovered in a West Berkshire village in what has been described as one of Britain's most exciting discoveries.

It is one of just three known mosaics of its kind in the world, according to Anthony Beeson, an expert on Roman and Greek architecture and art.

Archaeologist Matt Nichol described it as "second to none" in terms of imagery and iconography.

The mosaic depicts a mythical chariot race for the hand of a princess.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-berkshire-49524009
 

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Roman and Anglo-Saxon artefacts found in Baginton

Source: BBC Online
Date: 25 December, 2019

A Gaulish flagon used to pour wine has been preserved

"Breathtaking" Roman and Anglo-Saxon artefacts have been discovered in burial sites near the edge of an airport.

Pots, jugs and jewellery were found in Baginton, next to Lunt Roman Fort and Coventry Airport in Warwickshire.

Archaeologists believe two of the graves contained a "high status" ranking officer and Roman girl, aged between six and 12.

The artefacts could go on display at local museums.

The pieces were found during a dig at a housing development site in summer 2017 but many of the items have only just been officially dated and verified by experts.

Senior archaeologist Nigel Page, from Warwickshire County Council which led the dig, said it was a "remarkable" find.

"It's a significant discovery in the West Midlands," he said. "There was a real buzz of excitement when the site was found. It's breathtaking."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-coventry-warwickshire-50809706
 

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Archaeologists solve Roman Empire mystery with 500 letters discovered near Hadrian's Wall

ARCHAEOLOGISTS solved a 2000-year-old mystery after discovering 500 stone tablets revealing the secrets of the Roman Empire..

Source: express.co.uk
Date: 25 December, 2019

Neapolis was a major ancient hub, established as a trade port by the Greeks of Cyrene in the fifth century before it became a port when the Roman Empire conquered North Africa. Now, a city known as Nabeul stands where the metropolis once was, built on top of most of the remains, making them inaccessible and likely mostly destroyed. However, researcher Mounir Fantar discovered multiple tanks in this ancient city in 2017, leading him to theorise that Neapolis was an exporter of a fish sauce called garum.

https://www-express-co-uk.cdn.amppr...-mystery-vindolanda-tablets-hadrians-wall-spt
 

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Thel Roman massacre that never happened: Archaeologist is accused of inventing AD43 battle after digging up skeletons of ancient tribe

Source: dailymail.co.uk
Date: 25 December, 2019

It was written into the history books as one of the nation’s most dramatic and horrific battles.

But the tale of a Roman assault on Dorset’s Maiden Castle in AD43 was invented by an archaeologist with a flair for storytelling, research claims.

https://www-dailymail-co-uk.cdn.amp...3-battle-digging-skeletons-ancient-tribe.html
 

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According to my missus, most UK archaeologists are aware that Mortimer Wheeler misinterpreted the evidence at Maiden Castle. But she says it was an honest mistake, informed by the information available at the time, rather than a complete fabrication. Interpretations change all the time.
 

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First intact Roman-era egg recovered

Source: archaeology.co.uk
Date: 5 February, 2020

Archaeologists have recovered the first intact egg from Roman Britain among other unusual finds during investigations in Buckinghamshire.

Oxford Archaeology’s excavation at Berryfields uncovered a wealth of evidence for Iron Age and Roman occupation at the site. They found a waterlogged pit containing what are thought to be votive deposits, including four Roman chicken eggs and a well-preserved basketry tray, as well as bridge timbers that may have carried Akeman Street over the River Thame (a tributary of the Thames).

The site is located along the path of Akeman Street, an important Roman road that now lies beneath the A41, and adjacent to the site of a Roman town in the parish of Fleet Marston. It was therefore assumed that some evidence of Roman activity would be found at Berryfields – but the site yielded a much wider range of archaeology than expected.

https://www.archaeology.co.uk/articles/first-intact-roman-era-egg-recovered.htm
 

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First intact Roman-era egg recovered

Source: archaeology.co.uk
Date: 5 February, 2020

Archaeologists have recovered the first intact egg from Roman Britain among other unusual finds during investigations in Buckinghamshire.

Oxford Archaeology’s excavation at Berryfields uncovered a wealth of evidence for Iron Age and Roman occupation at the site. They found a waterlogged pit containing what are thought to be votive deposits, including four Roman chicken eggs and a well-preserved basketry tray, as well as bridge timbers that may have carried Akeman Street over the River Thame (a tributary of the Thames).

The site is located along the path of Akeman Street, an important Roman road that now lies beneath the A41, and adjacent to the site of a Roman town in the parish of Fleet Marston. It was therefore assumed that some evidence of Roman activity would be found at Berryfields – but the site yielded a much wider range of archaeology than expected.

https://www.archaeology.co.uk/articles/first-intact-roman-era-egg-recovered.htm
Hatch it...
 

maximus otter

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Thel Roman massacre that never happened: Archaeologist is accused of inventing AD43 battle after digging up skeletons of ancient tribe

But the tale of a Roman assault on Dorset’s Maiden Castle in AD43 was invented by an archaeologist with a flair for storytelling, research claims.
That would seem odd, considering that the same legion, commanded by the same man, had most definitely previously attacked another hill fort at Hod Hill, and had taken others farther south.

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EnolaGaia

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Drought conditions and aerial photographs reveal many previously unknown Roman sites and roads in Wales.
Missing Roman forts and roads revealed by drought

Roman forts, roads, military camps and villas have been identified by a new analysis of aerial photographs taken in the 2018 heatwave across Wales.

Scorched crop marks uncovered about 200 ancient sites during the drought.

Experts say the Roman finds are key pieces in the jigsaw to understand how Wales was conquered and dominated 2,000 years ago.

Researcher Toby Driver said the discoveries "turn everything we know about the Romans on its head".

The aerial investigator for the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales said the new research published in the journal Britannia showed the "Roman military machine coming to rural Wales". ...

The aerial photographs confirmed the locations of at least three new fort sites, including the first found in the Vale of Gwent at Carrow Hill, west of the Roman town of Caerwent and the Roman legionary fortress at Caerleon. ...

The researchers, who included Roman experts Jeffrey Davies and Barry Burnham, have also been able to identify details of new villas - including at St Arvans, north of Chepstow in Monmouthshire. ...

Perhaps the most startling discoveries have been pieces of unknown Roman road. ...

One shows how the Roman armies pushed their way south from Carmarthen to Kidwelly, reinforcing speculation the town was home to a Roman fort - even if it may now be covered by Kidwelly Castle.
"It's the scale of the control of Wales which is exciting to see," said Dr Driver. ...

"These big Roman roads striking through the landscape - straight as arrows through the landscape." ...

"There are still huge gaps. We're still missing a Roman fort at Bangor, we've got the roads, we've got the milestones - but no Roman fort. We're still missing a Roman fort near St Asaph, and near Lampeter in west Wales we should have one as well," he said.

"Although we had loads come out in 2018, we've got this big gaps in Roman Wales that we know should have military installations - but you've got to get out in dry weather to find them."
SOURCE: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-52911797
 
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