The Mysterious Case Of Elisa Lam

bugmum

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IH GP sounds on the ball. Is he any good at psychic diagnosis ? I've got this bad knee you see...….
He doesn't see so many patients face-to-face these days, so either his psychic diagnosis or his telephone diagnosis is coming on a treat.

However, I have terrible knees, but when I mention them he always says he's off-duty, so I cannot promise anything. ;)
 

catseye

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Neither Techy or his elderly mother are thirsty people.
This puzzles me as I'm swigging water, juice, tonic, squash and pop all day and if I don't I soon know about it. :eek:
I never seem to feel thirsty either. I was out in Oz in forty degree heat and people kept having to tell me to drink something. It just didn't occur to me and I never had that feeling of 'thirst' that should drive you to drink. I suspect I may be an evolutionary dead end...
 

escargot

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I never seem to feel thirsty either. I was out in Oz in forty degree heat and people kept having to tell me to drink something. It just didn't occur to me and I never had that feeling of 'thirst' that should drive you to drink. I suspect I may be an evolutionary dead end...
The drinking is just a habit with me. I have been tested for diabetes/pre-diabetes and am totally healthy. If I were on anything harder than Jusoda I'd be in trouble!

There's quite a bit of alcoholism in my family. I wonder if it starts with a big thirst?
 

bugmum

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I never seem to feel thirsty either. I was out in Oz in forty degree heat and people kept having to tell me to drink something. It just didn't occur to me and I never had that feeling of 'thirst' that should drive you to drink. I suspect I may be an evolutionary dead end...
As.a child, my sister often called me "the camel" because I didn't seem to drink as much as other people. Certainly whilst at secondary school, I rarely drank anything between breakfast and getting home, but I think this was partly because I was trying to avoid the horror of school toilets. These days my drinking habits are more sensible.
 

catseye

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The drinking is just a habit with me. I have been tested for diabetes/pre-diabetes and am totally healthy. If I were on anything harder than Jusoda I'd be in trouble!

There's quite a bit of alcoholism in my family. I wonder if it starts with a big thirst?
There's mostly diabetes in my family. I can't acquire the habit of drinking, as working on the till doesn't lend itself to regular drinking and I wonder if that's just 'trained me out' of it?
 

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I really don't know how people who are on dialysis awaiting transplants manage to cope when they are only allowed very minimal fluid intake.
 

sherbetbizarre

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Crime Scene: The Vanishing at the Cecil Hotel arrives on Netflix on February 10th, consisting of four 50-minute episodes.
Netflix has revealed the new series Crime Scene, which tackles the mythology of locations in contemporary crime. The first season focuses on the nefarious Cecil Hotel in downtown Los Angeles.

Directed by Joe Berlinger, the trailer contains footage of “Hotel Death,” explaining the murders and suicides that have occurred within its walls since the early Thirties. “Is there a room here that somebody hasn’t died in?” the hotel manager asks. “I never got used to that.”

The series also investigates the mystery of Elisa Lam...
https://www-rollingstone-com.cdn.am...otel-trailer-netflix-1119361/amp/?amp_js_v=a6

 

skinny

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Very tasty. My cuppa.
 

Mr. Banooka

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Spookdaddy

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For some reason this story breaks my heart. I find it so sad. I don’t know why it resonates so much. I just wish that people would let the whole paranormal slant go, and treat it as the tragedy it likely was. The most likely thing being the poor girl had a psychotic breakdown of some kind that led to her accidental death...
It probably has an actual name, but there's a factor I think of as 'travellers angst' which I sometimes wonder about it this case.

I used to travel an awful lot for work - sometimes based away from home for quite long periods of time. Although I really enjoyed that aspect of the job, and am fortunate to possess pretty robust mental health, I myself used to have the odd minor episode. I would describe these as little moments of fracture, or fleeting dissociative states, where your own actions, and those around you, and the environment that surrounds you - even time itself - appear as a series of disjunct elements, resulting in a kind of loss of equilibrium; as if your mooring line has snapped and you are floating out to sea, without power or sail. I wonder if it’s actually the very same process that can create a sense of freedom in relation to travel, but somehow contaminated by other elements, creating a darker version of that same loosening of bonds.

This still happens to me occasionally – but I know what it is, I know that it’s fleeting, I know how to deal with it. But, when I think about the Elisa Lam case, I just wonder if – when someone has significant underlying mental health issues, or is maybe suffering extreme stress in some other way – whether the thing I think of a as a passing mood can lodge itself far deeper in an individual's consciousness, and have a potential for much more devastating consequences.

Granted, the urban west coast of Canada is maybe not so very culturally different to the urban West Coast USA – but I’m not convinced that actual obvious differences in culture, language and environment are at all necessary factors in the phenomenon I’m trying to explain.

I often wonder about this - not just in the case of Elisa Lam, but also in other stories of individuals who seem to become somehow untethered when alone and far from home.

I wonder if anyone else knows what I mean, and recognises the thing that I've tried to explain?
 

catseye

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It probably has an actual name, but there's a factor I think of as 'travellers angst' which I sometimes wonder about it this case.

I used to travel an awful lot for work - sometimes based away from home for quite long periods of time. Although I really enjoyed that aspect of the job, and am fortunate to possess pretty robust mental health, I myself used to have the odd minor episode. I would describe these as little moments of fracture, or fleeting dissociative states, where your own actions, and those around you, and the environment that surrounds you - even time itself - appear as a series of disjunct elements, resulting in a kind of loss of equilibrium; as if your mooring line has snapped and you are floating out to sea, without power or sail. I wonder if it’s actually the very same process that can create a sense of freedom in relation to travel, but somehow contaminated by other elements, creating a darker version of that same loosening of bonds.

This still happens to me occasionally – but I know what it is, I know that it’s fleeting, I know how to deal with it. But, when I think about the Elisa Lam case, I just wonder if – when someone has significant underlying mental health issues, or is maybe suffering extreme stress in some other way – whether the thing I think of a as a passing mood can lodge itself far deeper in an individual's consciousness, and have a potential for much more devastating consequences.

Granted, the urban west coast of Canada is maybe not so very culturally different to the urban West Coast USA – but I’m not convinced that actual obvious differences in culture, language and environment are at all necessary factors in the phenomenon I’m trying to explain.

I often wonder about this - not just in the case of Elisa Lam, but also in other stories of individuals who seem to become somehow untethered when alone and far from home.

I wonder if anyone else knows what I mean, and recognises the thing that I've tried to explain?
The poor girl was off her meds, which I think probably contributed majorly.

I've sometimes had something like an extreme home sickness when away travelling. Especially when sitting alone in a hotel room - however exciting the reason for the journey and however fabulous the destination. The only times I'd not get it were when my family was with me. Maybe yours is something similar?
 

Spookdaddy

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The poor girl was off her meds, which I think probably contributed majorly.

I've sometimes had something like an extreme home sickness when away travelling. Especially when sitting alone in a hotel room - however exciting the reason for the journey and however fabulous the destination. The only times I'd not get it were when my family was with me. Maybe yours is something similar?
Although similar, I'm not sure it's exactly the same thing. The thing I'm trying to describe is disorienting to the point where even the idea of a home to be homesick for is negated; it's more of a feeling of complete disconnection than a wish to retreat to the comfort of old ones.
 

Yithian

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It probably has an actual name, but there's a factor I think of as 'travellers angst' which I sometimes wonder about it this case.

I used to travel an awful lot for work - sometimes based away from home for quite long periods of time. Although I really enjoyed that aspect of the job, and am fortunate to possess pretty robust mental health, I myself used to have the odd minor episode. I would describe these as little moments of fracture, or fleeting dissociative states, where your own actions, and those around you, and the environment that surrounds you - even time itself - appear as a series of disjunct elements, resulting in a kind of loss of equilibrium; as if your mooring line has snapped and you are floating out to sea, without power or sail. I wonder if it’s actually the very same process that can create a sense of freedom in relation to travel, but somehow contaminated by other elements, creating a darker version of that same loosening of bonds.
I've had some experiences in Japan while travelling alone that seem not a million miles from what you describe. I recall being massively jetlagged and far from home, waiting around for an embassy to issue me a visa. They couldn't tell me when it would be processed and suggested I just visit and ask each day. So for three days I woke up after lunchtime and shambled around Osaka with no idea of where I was (I'd checked into the first hotel I'd found), no phone or map, no Internet access and zero ability to speak Japanese. Every action taken was done on pure whim.

The thought repeatedly struck me that nobody in the entire country knew who I was, and nobody elsewhere in the world who did know me had the slightest inkling where I was.

The difficult part to explain is the odd mood this left me in: I felt as if I wasn't myself; rather, I was some kind of mobile mental-vessel, carrying the biographical memories of 'the real me' around inside, but as I was hardly speaking most days, I was almost completely anonymous. I actually enjoyed myself after a fashion, but I came away feeling as if I'd somehow stepped outside of my actual life for a few days.
 

Austin Popper

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I've had some similar experiences to these, though not quite the same either. I did three summers of bus tours, traveling constantly in the company of strangers. The job looked easy, but there was a lot of work the passengers never saw. Often I'd find myself having to make decisions late at night, when I was mentally spent. That didn't always go well.

One of the biggest problems I had was that after a while, I had more interesting experiences than I could process. It was then that I began to feel like part of the bus or something, with no life outside it. Having a rigid itinerary and many chores kept me firmly grounded most of the time, but there were times like the morning I woke up on top of the bedspread in my hotel room, fully clothed except for shoes, with just enough time to get a shower and do last night's chores, this morning's chores, and get the bus running, that my identity seemed submerged, or on hold, or something. I had no idea where to get something to eat quickly so it was coffee from the front desk and granola bars from my "pantry" again. Some of those trips ran together in a blur almost as they happened, and I'm sure I forgot a lot of things immediately.
 

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It probably has an actual name, but there's a factor I think of as 'travellers angst' which I sometimes wonder about it this case.

I used to travel an awful lot for work - sometimes based away from home for quite long periods of time. Although I really enjoyed that aspect of the job, and am fortunate to possess pretty robust mental health, I myself used to have the odd minor episode. I would describe these as little moments of fracture, or fleeting dissociative states, where your own actions, and those around you, and the environment that surrounds you - even time itself - appear as a series of disjunct elements, resulting in a kind of loss of equilibrium; as if your mooring line has snapped and you are floating out to sea, without power or sail. I wonder if it’s actually the very same process that can create a sense of freedom in relation to travel, but somehow contaminated by other elements, creating a darker version of that same loosening of bonds.

This still happens to me occasionally – but I know what it is, I know that it’s fleeting, I know how to deal with it. But, when I think about the Elisa Lam case, I just wonder if – when someone has significant underlying mental health issues, or is maybe suffering extreme stress in some other way – whether the thing I think of a as a passing mood can lodge itself far deeper in an individual's consciousness, and have a potential for much more devastating consequences.

Granted, the urban west coast of Canada is maybe not so very culturally different to the urban West Coast USA – but I’m not convinced that actual obvious differences in culture, language and environment are at all necessary factors in the phenomenon I’m trying to explain.

I often wonder about this - not just in the case of Elisa Lam, but also in other stories of individuals who seem to become somehow untethered when alone and far from home.

I wonder if anyone else knows what I mean, and recognises the thing that I've tried to explain?
I certainly recognize what you are saying and fleeting dissociative states perfectly describes what I very occasionally felt when working away. It's not that I was unused to travelling- I drove 100k miles per year during one period and at the most I was 5 hours from home and like you I enjoyed this at the time. Yet suddenly, for a few minutes, I would feel "out of it", on occasion, then it would pass. A peculiar sensation.
 

GNC

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Not a big fan of murder porn and I hope they don't focus too much on Lam as I reckon she's suffered enough, (and family and friends are still alive).
Those Netflix docs are pretty tabloidy, so you might be hoping against hope there. I think I'll skip it, "suffered enough" is right.
 

dejanmikic

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The thought repeatedly struck me that nobody in the entire country knew who I was, and nobody elsewhere in the world who did know me had the slightest inkling where I was
And this is when you put your My Bloody Valentine / Jesus and Mary Chain mixtape into your listening device
 

Souleater

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Bringing this thread back OT, just a few things that i have noticed that seem to crop up regularly in posts that are very speculative and some that have been mentioned and researched in some of the links
1, a lot of people see to assume the video of her in the lift is when the lift is at the lobby/ground floor, its been stated in previous links that the lift was not on the gf
2, she was suffering a mental episode due to either, not taking her meds or over dosing on her meds. The toxicology results from the autopsy showed levels of medication consistant with regular use at prescribed doses and in messages to her parents she stated that she was taking her meds
3, the video in the lift shows she was having a mental episode/scared and hiding.
A body language expert assessed the footage and said that she showed no signs of fear or anxiety and her behaviour was more likely to be flirtatious and playful.
4, the police couldnt search the hotel because they didnt have probable cause.
In the press conference, the police were treating her disappeaeence as a robbery/homicide (this was before her body was found), so what police force cannot get a search warrant to search the last known location that a potential homicide victim was seen in.
5, what happened to the forensic reports, finger prints on the window where the dog indicated and the water tower, what the white residue and sandy particulate were/where they came from.
5.its been proposed that a mental episode may have been brought on by her hearing/seeing mention of the LAM ELIZA TB lab process,
This didnt become common knowlege until after her disappearance, and it is unlikely, as it was a lab process that it would have been mentioned anywhere she could have heard it.

Questions that still have yet to be addressed,
1.why would she, if she entered the water tower to cool off or of her own volition, dump all her possessions in the water aswell.
2. Where is the footage from the reported 'numerous' cameras covering the corridoors in the hotel.
3.why was the Lam familys case against the hotel dismissed before it got to court.
 

Naughty_Felid

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A body language expert assessed the footage and said that she showed no signs of fear or anxiety and her behaviour was more likely to be flirtatious and playful.
But driven by what? There are elements of play but it's clear to me there is nobody there with her. I would say she is either intoxicated, (not backed up with the bloods), or be having an episode. There is nobody else with her.

She is in a dissociative state I don't know why this is an issue - it's clear to me.
 

Souleater

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But driven by what? There are elements of play but it's clear to me there is nobody there with her. I would say she is either intoxicated, (not backed up with the bloods), or be having an episode. There is nobody else with her.

She is in a dissociative state I don't know why this is an issue - it's clear to me.
There is nobody in view of the camera, that is different from thete being nobody with her, if like has been speculated, she is on the 14th floor, where the more salubrious rooms were, rather than the hostel area (floors 1-4), its not unreasonable to think there may be a guest she is flirting with, who is stood in the doorway of his room or in the corridoor.
Why do you say
She is in a dissociative state
What evidence do you have for this opinion?
When viewed at the correct speed, her movements in the video are not that odd, and, according to the evidence available, she was taking her meds at the perscribed dosage.
 

ramonmercado

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The Netflix series is quite interesting. Explores things from all angles. I'm inclined to believe that she just accidentally drowned whilst undergoing a psychotic episode. Her behaviour over her time at the hotel, including the elevator episode and leaving weird notes on other peoples beds points to this. Of course the web sleuths are interesting as is the hotel manager. Worth watching.
 

dejanmikic

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Without checking the Net - what do you remember of the water tank where the body was found? Was it closed tight or open? [Mandella effect]
 

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Without checking the Net - what do you remember of the water tank where the body was found? Was it closed tight or open? [Mandella effect]
Just reading through the mandela effect thread as we speak lol
 

ramonmercado

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Without checking the Net - what do you remember of the water tank where the body was found? Was it closed tight or open? [Mandella effect]
It's hatch was unlocked, that was common at the time according to the Cecil Hotel manager.
 

EnolaGaia

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Anyone watching the 'Elisa Lam' 4 part doc?
 
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