Weird Cornwall

Gjinn

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#91
carole said:
Speaking as a furriner, what's the matter with Camborne? I bet it isn't as bad as Middlesbrough!

Carole
It's just a very dank place to be. There's nothing much of note there, half of it is borded up and there's high unemployment.

I've been told (don't know if it's true) that there are genuine inbreeding problems as well... I know there are in Redruth and I have a feeling Camborne is the same.

As far as I remember the only decent shop there was Trevada music which is where I did my work experience when I was in school and where I got my first clarinet :)

Gjinn
xx
 
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Anonymous

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#92
Gjinn said:
It's just a very dank place to be. There's nothing much of note there, half of it is borded up and there's high unemployment.

I've been told (don't know if it's true) that there are genuine inbreeding problems as well... I know there are in Redruth and I have a feeling Camborne is the same.

As far as I remember the only decent shop there was Trevada music which is where I did my work experience when I was in school and where I got my first clarinet :)

Gjinn
xx
Yes theres a beaten dog look to the town as a whole...recently they spent a lot of money on the town center to try to make the residents feel better about it all. They paved the center with granite to symbolise the great mineing and quarying tradition...it looks nice it realy does...its also Chinese Granite!!!!! says it all realy...
 

rynner2

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#93
I have investigated a haunting on the outskirts of Camborne, but it was rather inconclusive (as usual), and seemed to disappear following the death of the grandmother in the family.

At its height, however, it exhibited most of the ghost/poltergeist features.
 

marion

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#94
Gjinn said:
It's just a very dank place to be. There's nothing much of note there, half of it is borded up and there's high unemployment.

I've been told (don't know if it's true) that there are genuine inbreeding problems as well... I know there are in Redruth and I have a feeling Camborne is the same.

As far as I remember the only decent shop there was Trevada music which is where I did my work experience when I was in school and where I got my first clarinet :)

Gjinn
xx
My sister lives in Cornwall and works in the hospital at Newquay , they had a patient in casualty that was from a place my sister describes as being full of odd inbred people.The man had fallen off his bike and hit his head . After about six hours of the man drooling, rolling his eyeballs and being incapable of understandable speech they realised that that was what he was like normally and sent him home . Maybe he was from Camborne ?
 
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Anonymous

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#95
Thanks for all your replies guys, as a new member I really appreciate it.

Camborne is a [email protected] hole true but one of the more attractive shit holes in the world.

Sidecar_jon I do study for an eventual BA in Truro as it's a partner institute of the UNI of Plymouth and they have the photographic facilities in Truro that they don't in Plymouth.

I live in camborne because its cheap and had a flat I could live in with my pets.

I know trevada music:cool:

and I don't spend all my time in camborne I go all over, so keep the ideas coming.

Camborne is the worst place for inbreds. The people look like they've fallen off a Fu#@ing asteroid and into Chernobyl then into pig sty and finnally married their sisters and brothers, believe me its that bad

And the kids look totally bored stiff and the only bands they know are slipknot and well thats it.(big sale on slip knot clothes)

The high street has 5 or 6 pasty bakers(groce elastic bands in cardboard) and even more awful charity shops the people don't give away anything decent and I live in one of the most desirable buildings in camborne and it only costs me £305 a month.

ps I love my course and get chatted up by lots of lovely chickies he he he.
 

SoundDust

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#96
I used to go on holiday in cornwall - i don't remember the inbreds, just a load of surfers everywhere (no offence meant to any surfers btw) with big surfboards parading the streets of newquay
 
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Anonymous

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#98
Demon Avenger said:
Lucky you, I like Newquay too though but some guys just should'nt where a wet suit:D
i was in Newquey a couple of weeks ago and found it vile..well not to my tastes anyway...first time ive seen a Cornish pub with bouncers on the door too!.... Healand Hotel does good food tho and is a masterpice of Victorian confection.. Atalntic hotel jsut down the road was Setting for part of Magical Mystery tour (beatles).. they danced down the staircase and played on the beech..
 
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Anonymous

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#99
Starting out from Cambourne, eh? Get yourself a decent bike. Mountain bike, or a good hybrid. then cycle west along the north coast heading towards Land's End. Bypass St Ives. After that tourist town, it gets interesting. Though St Ives is much better out of season.

A lot of the walled, field formations, you see around you and sloping down towards the sea, go back to the bronze age. First stop Zennor. The pub, The Zennor Arms, used to be pretty good. Zennor has a good mermaid legend attached.

Next, Pendeen. Couple of pubs and Geevor Tin Mine. I remember when it closed.

Next, St Just. The Star Inn used to be excellent! Keep going. About five from Land's End there's an excellent little sandy cove. It was where truly serious, hip surfers used to catch some excellent waves. There used to be a great little camping site there too. See if you can find it.

Don't forget to check out the Neolithic, bronze and iron age monuments along this route. Rings, standing stones, trillithions and forts. This is, reputedly, one of the most magical corners of Britain. Loads of ley lines end, or begin, here.

Smashing place.
 
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Anonymous

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Fine idea indeed... but only attempt it if ur legs are well used to the hills!... weve cycled on our tandem rouns bits of it and boy are ther some hill!.... as an aside..do u know anything about St Ives? i have ofent driven past that odd church as u go out of the town at the top of the hill . and never had the time to stop and look..it apears to have a tower but with a pitched roof!....
 

marion

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St Nectan's Glen is an interesting place to visit , and the church at Zennor too .
I like St Ives , it is full of cats despite the efforts of the man and his seven wives .
 

brianellwood

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Can certainly recommend the Star in St. Just!:D There are loads of sites and stories around West Penwith and some guy does a ghost tour around Penzance in the summer. The most haunted site is Pengersick castle just east of penzance, but I don't know anything about access arrangements. It has been on tv more than once starting with Rev. Fanthorpe ( or is it Fanshawe... oh well):confused:
 
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Anonymous

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u must glow inthe dark!.. the water suply of St Ives used to come from the old mine workings and one idea was to sell it as a Spa town...The Radium Spa town!........
 

marion

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Apparently you uaed to be able to get radium ointment for rubbing on your face to give you a healthy glow !
 

intaglio

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Word of advice, Never, ever, ever tell someone from 'Druth that it is like Camborne or vice versa. You'll find something strange and not very fortean happening to you in certain pubs.

Same applies to Falmouth and 'Rynn.

Of course it could become Fortean if you come back to haunt them.
 
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Anonymous

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yes cornwall has a "twin town" thing.. camborne and Druth...penryn and Falmouth, Penzance and Newlyn... historical i think , first the industry then the fishing....or is that the other way round?
 

rynner2

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First Charters:
Penryn 1236
Falmouth 1661

So Penryn was older, when Falmouth was founded, than Falmouth is now. Strange twins!
 

brianellwood

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and St.Just and Pendeen and so on down to the guys who fished out of Sennen cove v the boys who fished out of boat cove, and come to that we live on the hill above the town so we're uppers not downers!:D Will try to find some more info around my area for you
 

rynner2

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On another thread someone queried why Joseph of Arimathea would ever have wanted to visit Britain. I suggested that, as he was a rich man, he may have been engaged in the tin trade.

Just dug up this extract:

from "The Cornish Mining Industry", J.A.Buckley. Tor Mark Press, Penryn (no, I'm not JAB!)

Comish mining is one of the most ancient of industries and it is among the most fascinating. Few industries claimed the attention of so many ancient writers. Leaving aside the questionable association with the Phoenicians and Herodotus's Cassiterides, the Comish tin trade can still claim great antiquity. Throughout its long period of successful operation it has been marked by tremendous achievement, outstanding courage, ingenious innovation and dogged perseverance. It is no wonder that the story generates such abiding interest and even excitement among people from so many different backgrounds.

Artifacts found on tin sites, and identified by archaeologists, indicate that the tin industry was established by the Early Bronze Age (2100-1500 BC), and was widespread by the Middle Bronze Age (1500-800 BC). Finds in all the main tin-producing localities between Dartmoor and Land's End show that from as early as 1500 BC the extraction of tin has probably continued without serious interruption until the present day.

Historical references support this. They show a well established and fairly sophisticated tin trade between Cornwalll and the Mediterranean by the 4th century BC. There is little evidence that the great events of history - such as the invasion by the Romans and their subsequent withdrawal 400 years later - did any more than temporarily disturb that international trade.

Timaeus of Sicily and Pytheas of Massalia (Marseilles), of the 4th and 3rd centuries BC, gave accounts of Cornwall's tin trade. Neither author's work has survived but from fragments quoted by other authors it is clear that Pytheas had visited and probably circumnavigated Britain some time between 325-250 BC. In the 1st century BC, Liodorus Siculus quoted Pytheas' report and told much about the nature and importance of Cornwall's tin trade. He said that the Cornish were friendly and civilised, due to contact with foreign merchants. They extracted the tin from its host rock 'in an ingenious manner'. He refers to their skill in dressing and smelting the concentrate, and then describes how they conveyed the metallic tin to an off-shore island, called Ictis. The island, generally presumed to be St Michael's Mount, could only be approached at ebb tide. The tin was then carried across to Gaul and then by horseback to the mouth of the Rhone, where modern-day Marseilles is located. We are left in no doubt as to the importance of the trade.

From the Early Bronze Age to the end of the Mediaeval period most tin in Cornwall came from streaming alluvial deposits. Over thousands of years cassiterite was weathered from the outcrops of lodes, and washed by flood into the nearest valley.
 

Melf

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bore dda
as a cymric man living in exile in the land of the sias let me tell you. dont forget you only need 2 other countrys to aknowlege your indi from london eg ask eire and scotland or iom weve be tryng for years so when u get indi aknowlege us as well then we can form the feduration of united celtic kingdoms

and outsiders are usualy ret. majors/generals etc allways seem to be incharge of "the "local marina (basiclly you can work in the marina but to jion you need refs form at least 3 tpo brass etc its the same in cymru

re:- the taymar as a border,
offas dyke was built by the cymric to keep the sias out and look whats happened theyve gone and built 2 bridges and we have to pay to come back home:D acient cymru joke

this ends the political boardcast on behalf of the fed of united celtic lingdoms now back to the thread
 

Diabolik8

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Sidecar John

I thought I recognised ye.. Didn't you used to put out a paranormal fanzine a few years ago?
 
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Anonymous

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Re: Sidecar John

Diabolik said:
I thought I recognised ye.. Didn't you used to put out a paranormal fanzine a few years ago?
Well Wierd Cornwall... thats me!... u round here then?
 

Gjinn

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Talking about 'The Cornishman' newspaper, a mate of mine brought me last weeks issue up from Penzance when he came to visit, none of my friends up here could understand why I was so terribly amused to read it.

They all appreciated that one of the top stories was basically about a man sitting at a bus stop on a chair though :)

Ahhhh.. I miss Cornwall so much, soon be home for Christmas though.

(my mate also brought me up some clotted cream and I made saffron cake for everyone to try)

Gjinn
xx
 
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Anonymous

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Gjinn said:
Ahhhh.. I miss Cornwall so much, soon be home for Christmas though.

(my mate also brought me up some clotted cream and I made saffron cake for everyone to try)

Gjinn
xx
ahh toasted safron buns and butter....ummm
 
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Bid to attract supernatural fans

Cornwall's historic home owners and tourism bosses are being urged to make more of the area's supernatural credentials.

The county has many mystic sites, but some feel it could do more to attract visitors interested in the paranormal.

South West Tourism collects details of accommodation which may be haunted because many holidaymakers specifically ask to stay in such places.

Chief executive Malcolm Bell said it was an indication of a growing market.

Separate presences

"The holiday industry is becoming very segmented into people' s interests, as shown by the recent facts and figures on surfing holidays," he said.

"The idea and desire to discover more about the unknown is very strong and, given that Cornwall's history is steeped in myths and legends, it's attracting people who have a desire to explain the unexplainable."

There are said to be more than 20 separate presences at Pengersick Castle, near Penzance, including a ghostly 14th Century monk, a 13-year-old girl who danced to her death off the battlements and a four-year-old boy who tugs at visitors' clothes.

The famous old Jamaica Inn at Bolventor, near Bodmin, has an equally well-known story of a haunting.

The ghost of a murdered sailor returning to finish his last drink has been seen by many visitors sitting on a wall outside.

Celtic connection

Graham King, the owner of the Museum of Witchcraft in Boscastle, said sensitive marketing could reap rewards.

"You don't want crass promotion of this sort of thing," he said.

"It's lovely to have people coming along who are interested in spirituality and the Celtic connection and appeal of these wonderful Celtic lands, but you don't want to over-exploit it because you could spoil it."

Angela Evans, from Pengersick Castle, hosts ghost trails at the property.

She said she saw nothing wrong with trading on peoples' desire to be spooked.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/england/cornwall/3546726.stm

Published: 2004/08/09 07:29:06 GMT

© BBC MMIV
 

mxhaunted

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It’s true. I’ve been visiting Cornwall for many a year and you really don’t get much information on haunted places to visit. The few that I know are haunted is Jamaica Inn (and I think St Michaels mount). It’s a nice, solid, old pub and worth a visit… even if the locals are a bit “Slaughtered Lamb”. But they really aren’t fourth coming with any info on the ghosts.

Shame they are chancing their initiative about things spooky just when I’m going to miss going down there for the first time in years. :/

MX
 
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Supernatural vision

November 26, 2004


Giant killers, angels and ghosts are just part of the charm of St Michael's Mount, writes David Wilson.

In England, if you head for the Cornish coast, five kilometres east of the town of Penzance, you will find what enthusiasts call the jewel of Cornwall: St Michael's Mount.

This 8.5-hectare island is small enough to take in easily, but also dramatic, thanks to the castle perched on top. Approached by ferry at high tide and causeway at low tide, the mount, which is essentially a granite crag rearing out of the sea, has hidden depths.

According to legend, it was created by a giant called Cormoran, who would wade to the mainland to seize cattle from local farms and carry them back across the water. After a reward was offered for killing the giant, a boy called Jack came forward. One night, as Cormoran slept, Jack crept over to the mount and hollowed out a pit halfway up one side. In the morning, Jack blew on his horn to wake the thief.

The giant raced down the side of the mount but, blinded by the sun, failed to see Jack or the hole and fell in. Jack then filled it, burying Cormoran alive. Apparently delighted by this, the local people dubbed the perpetrator Jack the Giant Killer and he promptly went professional, butchering a slew of overgrown men.

If you climb the pathway to the castle at the top of the mount you will stumble upon a heart-shaped stone said to be Cormoran's heart. Stand on it and you can supposedly hear the giant's heartbeat.

Another supernatural with a stake in the mount is St Michael, the high-flying angel who led the army of God during an uprising led by an upstart called Lucifer.

Even by the standards of immortals, St Michael has a dazzling resumé. He supposedly works against temptation and on behalf of ambulance drivers, artists, bakers, bankers, boatmen, medical technicians, paratroopers and paramedics. He also moonlights for Spanish cops, sailors and radiotherapists, among others. In his spare time, he lobbies for Texas, Florida and, of course, Cornwall (and you thought you were busy).

In 495, fishermen spotted this phenomenal multi-tasker either suspended high on a ledge or walking on the water. By coincidence, around the same time he was spotted at the island of Mont St Michel, across the Channel off the coast of Brittany.

In 1135, a Benedictine priory linked to the mount's French twin was built on the English crag in Mounts Bay, destined to endure until the early 15th century, when King Henry V declared war on France and seized the mount for the Crown as an alien priory. By 1424, all links between the pair had been severed.

The Cornish one then evolved into a fortress that was armed, defended, stormed and recaptured routinely over the centuries before it morphed into a shrine for pilgrims, then a castellated mansion. It came into the possession of the aristocratic

St Aubyn family in 1659. Three centuries later, the St Aubyns teamed with the National Trust and their private fortress and its grounds were thrown open to the public.

Today, if you slog up the steep, rough steps you can tour the castle, which features an armoury, a drawing room and a 14th-century church. Naturally, this complex is haunted by two ghosts. One, which sounds like a poltergeist, just twiddles doorknobs and generally plays up. The other, a grey lady with issues, supposedly rushes along the Long Passage and vanishes at the window at the end.

Look out and you will experience some of the best views around. If you are lucky, when summer takes the chill off the Channel you might just catch a glimpse of some seals or bottlenose dolphins.

For information on prices and opening hours, visit www.stmichaelsmount.co.uk
Source
 
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