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What's The Most Outrageous Conspiracy Theory You Have Heard?

Well, this! One poster highlighted their satellite TV dish, saying I point it at the sky where I'm told there is a satellite — I get TV. If I point it somewhere else, I don't: QED. He did not have an answer.
There is such a thing as bouncing a radio signal off a high-altitude layer of clouds, whereupon it ends up over the horizon... BUT that doesn't produce a clean, consistent signal like a signal received from a satellite.
 
There's a proper wingnut on another forum I use, who under the broader heading of the 'moon landing hoax', argues that satellites are equally fictitious and physically impossible under the current laws of physics.

He attempts to sound sciencey, but fails miserably and trots out a number of now worn out and debunked tropes but seems to relish the fight more than the point.
The attempt to sound sciencey is usually an appeal to intuition, the principal that governs most science denial. Intuition is the enemy of rational thought unless it's backed by a good understanding of the facts and leads to a testable understanding. But making something sound intuitive can convince a lot of people.
I wouldn't even bother arguing with these people Kondoru, it's a waste of time. It's almost impossible to change the minds of the paranoid. I understand, you understand, they don't want to understand. They instead live for fringe beliefs and probably think The X Files were based on true stories.
Aye.
 
I'm in an online argument on Facebook with a woman who maintains that you have to send any manuscripts you have written to yourself in order to have copyright, and that she needs to protect herself against theft of said manuscript if she sends it to any publishers. I've pointed out that copyright is automatic as soon as you've written the manuscript and that nobody is going to steal an amateur manuscript, or ideas from it. She will not have this and is deeply entrenched in 'what about....' and keeps saying that there are 'loads' of cases of people being prosecuted for stealing manuscripts. I think she's thinking about plagiarism of existing books, but she says no, it's copyright and everybody is doing it.

I've given up now.
 
I'm in an online argument on Facebook with a woman who maintains that you have to send any manuscripts you have written to yourself in order to have copyright, and that she needs to protect herself against theft of said manuscript if she sends it to any publishers. I've pointed out that copyright is automatic as soon as you've written the manuscript and that nobody is going to steal an amateur manuscript, or ideas from it. She will not have this and is deeply entrenched in 'what about....' and keeps saying that there are 'loads' of cases of people being prosecuted for stealing manuscripts. I think she's thinking about plagiarism of existing books, but she says no, it's copyright and everybody is doing it.

I've given up now.
All she needs to do is put the copyright symbol, the date and her name on the manuscript.
That's all.
 
nobody is going to steal an amateur manuscript, or ideas from it.
Ummm... judging by the number of lawsuits alleging exactly that in both Hollywood and the video game industry, this happens all the time, including with professionally prepared pitches that get rejected but wind up suspiciously similar to final "not influenced by anyone" output.
 
Sorry, I'm on her side. Mailing it to yourself so you can later show it existed before a certain date makes sense. Anyone can backdate a manuscript.
 
Sorry, I'm on her side. Mailing it to yourself so you can later show it existed before a certain date makes sense. Anyone can backdate a manuscript.
It's automatically copyrighted to you as soon as it's finished. You don't need to put any effort in at all. It's your product. As @Mythopoeika says above.
 
It's a bit difficult to top the Flat Earth one isn't it?

Sadly, I'm sure someone has, in fact, I'm sure many people have...
The artist formerly known as Hans Wormhat (his YouTube name is now a string of letters I'm assured have some religious significance) will accept any conspiracy theory and then some.

 
Sorry, I'm on her side. Mailing it to yourself so you can later show it existed before a certain date makes sense. Anyone can backdate a manuscript.
Having been involved in writing, copyright and trademark disputes, I have plenty of experience with this.
It's more of an archaic copyright protection.
Before the advent of easy self-publishing, home word-processing and internet, if you designed a game then you needed a publisher. You'd send your idea in, the publisher would be kind, give advice then say "Sorry - not for us!" A couple of months down the line, the publisher would bring out their own version of the game. This happened exactly to a friend of mine.
Unless you pay for a good solicitor and have rock-hard evidence that a) you came up with the idea before them, and b) they have changed little from the first concept, then you lose. The ol' 'Post it to yourself, recorded delivery, leave unsealed' thing was a cheap example of a). Sadly, b) relies on court decision.
All this was before the available dissemination by internet.
Now, thanks to metadata, the creation date/creator thing is practically a done deal. The problem comes with the decision of how much does a creation need to be changed in order for it not to be a copy?
Advice is always keep records and copies. Write the dated copyright* declaration at the start and end of any text.
It is quite true that as soon as you create something, be it a game, picture or writing, it is yours. But you always have to state this. It is always about legal claim, not actual claim.

* Trademarks are a whole different game. You cannot just claim a trademark - you must register it. To do this, you apply to the relevant body (in the UK it's the IPO), they make sure no one has similar in a similar field of interest (known as a 'class') and, after announcing your claim for a short period, they tell you when you own it. Unless, you have registered your trademark, you cannot put the TM subscript in any publication. Oddly, you don't have to show it if you have got the registered Trade Mark.
Trade marks are a nightmare if it goes to court, so the IPO really double-check if it is contested. This happened to us recently. We registered a trademark (back in 2010) for a dog treat called the Cherry Barkwell. Recently, a treat company that has been very successful in stocking a pet shop chain and was 'snapping up' and trade marking every name it could think of. The IPO paused their claim for the Barkwell - technically, we are asked to give permission and cede our rights to them. We didn't. We were asked to present evidence of our use (to the IPO) in the form of publications, leaflets, even photos of the name at markets and events. The rival company could produce no evidence to counter. We won. Thing is, they knew that if they went to the expense of a court they'd lose. It would've been cheaper to buy the title from us - we were open to the deal but it would be worth thousands to us. However, essentially they didn't want to pay anything.
 
The artist formerly known as Hans Wormhat (his YouTube name is now a string of letters I'm assured have some religious significance) will accept any conspiracy theory and then some.


Obviously penguins aren't real - no birds are. I don't even believe in the chocolate bars.

While we're on the topic, your username and avatar are highly suspicious...
 
Having been involved in writing, copyright and trademark disputes, I have plenty of experience with this.
It's more of an archaic copyright protection.
Before the advent of easy self-publishing, home word-processing and internet, if you designed a game then you needed a publisher. You'd send your idea in, the publisher would be kind, give advice then say "Sorry - not for us!" A couple of months down the line, the publisher would bring out their own version of the game. This happened exactly to a friend of mine.
Unless you pay for a good solicitor and have rock-hard evidence that a) you came up with the idea before them, and b) they have changed little from the first concept, then you lose. The ol' 'Post it to yourself, recorded delivery, leave unsealed' thing was a cheap example of a). Sadly, b) relies on court decision.
All this was before the available dissemination by internet.
Now, thanks to metadata, the creation date/creator thing is practically a done deal. The problem comes with the decision of how much does a creation need to be changed in order for it not to be a copy?
Advice is always keep records and copies. Write the dated copyright* declaration at the start and end of any text.
It is quite true that as soon as you create something, be it a game, picture or writing, it is yours. But you always have to state this. It is always about legal claim, not actual claim.

* Trademarks are a whole different game. You cannot just claim a trademark - you must register it. To do this, you apply to the relevant body (in the UK it's the IPO), they make sure no one has similar in a similar field of interest (known as a 'class') and, after announcing your claim for a short period, they tell you when you own it. Unless, you have registered your trademark, you cannot put the TM subscript in any publication. Oddly, you don't have to show it if you have got the registered Trade Mark.
Trade marks are a nightmare if it goes to court, so the IPO really double-check if it is contested. This happened to us recently. We registered a trademark (back in 2010) for a dog treat called the Cherry Barkwell. Recently, a treat company that has been very successful in stocking a pet shop chain and was 'snapping up' and trade marking every name it could think of. The IPO paused their claim for the Barkwell - technically, we are asked to give permission and cede our rights to them. We didn't. We were asked to present evidence of our use (to the IPO) in the form of publications, leaflets, even photos of the name at markets and events. The rival company could produce no evidence to counter. We won. Thing is, they knew that if they went to the expense of a court they'd lose. It would've been cheaper to buy the title from us - we were open to the deal but it would be worth thousands to us. However, essentially they didn't want to pay anything.
I think a lot of the 'copyright theft' that people are thinking of actually comes down to plagiarism, which is a different thing.
 
I think a lot of the 'copyright theft' that people are thinking of actually comes down to plagiarism, which is a different thing.
Now I've started my degree course, the whole subject of plagiarism and using AI has come into sharp focus.
The university (in this case, the Open University), goes to great pains - with several tutorials and advice sources - to explain what plagiarism is, how it is wrong, and how much it will affect your assessment should it come into question. At all times, students are required to give full credit and reference sources.
 
Now I've started my degree course, the whole subject of plagiarism and using AI has come into sharp focus.
The university (in this case, the Open University), goes to great pains - with several tutorials and advice sources - to explain what plagiarism is, how it is wrong, and how much it will affect your assessment should it come into question. At all times, students are required to give full credit and reference sources.
I don't envy them. When I did my degree we had to submit everything through 'Turn It In' which scanned for plagiarism, but these days with people using hired writers or AI to write scripts for them it must be incredibly hard for Universities to ensure that students aren't taking short cuts.
 
I don't envy them. When I did my degree we had to submit everything through 'Turn It In' which scanned for plagiarism, but these days with people using hired writers or AI to write scripts for them it must be incredibly hard for Universities to ensure that students aren't taking short cuts.
I know what you mean but back in the early 80's, we were using Casio watches to cheat in maths exams so this is nothing new.
 
I had a brush with conspiracy theories last night at work. My supervisor was on the headset asking if we knew about these 'test messages' that would be sent to our phones, and how she was going to disable her phone because 'once you answer it, THEY are in your phone and they can control your banking and all your other apps'.

I did briefly raise the question - why the hell would they bother, as, presumably 'they' could find much easier ways of getting into the banking system than relying on EVERYONE having a smart phone which they used for doing their banking, but it was a busy evening so I didn't get an answer.
It's late so forgive any spelling errors.

There is a very real spy program for mobile phones which activated by text. If you clicked on a link it downloaded the program onto your phone and then the owner of said program could have full access. It was developed by an Israeli security firm. It then went on to you just having to open a text message with GIF in it which was actually a program hidden in an image. The new generation (from around 2017) is a zero-click program. All they need is your phone number. It's called Pegasus as is very real and active today used by several Governments.

The good news is that you're not interesting enough for anyone to use it on you.

Here, click this link to read more... go on...https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pegasus_(spyware)
 
It's late so forgive any spelling errors.

There is a very real spy program for mobile phones which activated by text. If you clicked on a link it downloaded the program onto your phone and then the owner of said program could have full access. It was developed by an Israeli security firm. It then went on to you just having to open a text message with GIF in it which was actually a program hidden in an image. The new generation (from around 2017) is a zero-click program. All they need is your phone number. It's called Pegasus as is very real and active today used by several Governments.

The good news is that you're not interesting enough for anyone to use it on you.

Here, click this link to read more... go on...https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pegasus_(spyware)
I don't think this is what she was referring to. She genuinely thought that the alarm warning would mean that the government would have access to our bank accounts (although quite why they would be bothered I don't know, HMRC pretty well know who's got all the money in the country). She's a bit of a knee-jerk reactionary (if the Daily Mirror says it, it must be true).

Anyone can track me, anytime. My search history is going to give them kittens, but waiting for me to actually carry out some of the things I have Googled is going to bore a lot of people to death.
 
Drop everything!
Stop engineering!
72447e100df25634.jpeg
 
I'm in an online argument on Facebook with a woman who maintains that you have to send any manuscripts you have written to yourself in order to have copyright, and that she needs to protect herself against theft of said manuscript if she sends it to any publishers. I've pointed out that copyright is automatic as soon as you've written the manuscript and that nobody is going to steal an amateur manuscript, or ideas from it. She will not have this and is deeply entrenched in 'what about....' and keeps saying that there are 'loads' of cases of people being prosecuted for stealing manuscripts. I think she's thinking about plagiarism of existing books, but she says no, it's copyright and everybody is doing it.

I've given up now.
It isn't a bad idea if it helps her feel better while she is trying to get something published. It gives her a date to prove when she finished it. I did that when I had an invention I considered patenting, though I never followed through. It wasn't a good design and I am working on a better one. But I have the proof of my idea with a postmark in case I ever do submit a patent application. I don't think this qualifies as a conspiracy, since like someone else pointed out there are tons of copywrite lawsuits.
 
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