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The mystery of icon-preserving bees
For a decade, a beekeeper named Sidoros Ţiminis, living in the region of Kapandriti, near Athens, has kept a tradition: every spring, he slips icons of Christ, the Holy Virgin and different saints in his beehives, in order to bless his bees and his yearly honey production.
And every year, the very same mysterious phenomenon occurs: bees make their honeycomb cells around the pious images, meticulously avoiding covering them.

There are two things that may explain the avoidance of comb-building over the icon figures.

The first is the hypothesis that bees may avoid building comb over a richly colored background that may suggest flowers. I don't know whether anyone's tested this hypothesis by checking whether bees will similarly avoid obscuring colored non-holy imagery.

The more substantive - and more likely - explanation concerns the surface of the icon images. In commercial beehives there are rectangular frames within which the bees build their wax combs. A frame may be "foundationless" (just an open frame) or contain a foundation (a planar sheet of material - usually textured with (e.g.) dimples or recesses - onto which the comb is attached).

This Greek beekeeper inserts the icons into his frames (or frame equivalents) as foundations (or at least partial foundations). It appears to me that the icon images used are either glossy photos or prints under glass. Neither of these - particularly glass - provides a surface onto which the beeswax can reliably and securely adhere. Bees will leave voids over foundations or sub-areas of foundations that don't afford sufficient anchoring for the comb.

According to this 2018 research report:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6008556/

... bees may re-orient their comb structure circa 90 degrees and continue building orthogonally to the plane in which the void is left - precisely what can be seen in the upper-left photo with the blue icon figure.
 
There are two things that may explain the avoidance of comb-building over the icon figures.

The first is the hypothesis that bees may avoid building comb over a richly colored background that may suggest flowers. I don't know whether anyone's tested this hypothesis by checking whether bees will similarly avoid obscuring colored non-holy imagery.

The more substantive - and more likely - explanation concerns the surface of the icon images. In commercial beehives there are rectangular frames within which the bees build their wax combs. A frame may be "foundationless" (just an open frame) or contain a foundation (a planar sheet of material - usually textured with (e.g.) dimples or recesses - onto which the comb is attached).

This Greek beekeeper inserts the icons into his frames (or frame equivalents) as foundations (or at least partial foundations). It appears to me that the icon images used are either glossy photos or prints under glass. Neither of these - particularly glass - provides a surface onto which the beeswax can reliably and securely adhere. Bees will leave voids over foundations or sub-areas of foundations that don't afford sufficient anchoring for the comb.

According to this 2018 research report:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6008556/

... bees may re-orient their comb structure circa 90 degrees and continue building orthogonally to the plane in which the void is left - precisely what can be seen in the upper-left photo with the blue icon figure.
It could also be that the bees are avoiding toxic pigments.
 
Just found this by accident:
https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/what-is-it-like-to-be-a-bee

Fun facts about bees, stunning photos, and a discussion of how scientists are able to measure parts of the brain that are involved in consciousness and what their findings may indicate about what it's like to be a bee:
"If behavior can’t enough tell us about the inner life of a bee, perhaps the structure of their sesame seed–sized brains can. In a human brain, key studies suggest consciousness lies in the midbrain, an evolutionarily much older section. In a study published last year, [Adrew B.] Barron and [Colin] Klein investigated the structure of the bee brain, which seems to be made up of similar bits to our own, with a region responsible for similar tasks. 'It’s smaller, it’s organized differently, it’s different-shaped, but if you look at the kind of computations it does, it’s doing the same sort of things as the midbrain,' Klein says. 'So if you think in humans the midbrain is responsible for being conscious, and you think this is doing the same kind of thing, then you ought to think insects are conscious as well.' "
 
Newly reported research seems to explain why bees can't fly far over a reflective mirror-like lake or other surface. It seems they need to see terrain below themselves moving to assess their speed and maintain their altitude. Without the essential cues they descend and crash in short order.
There's a Really Weird Effect When Honeybees Fly Over a Mirror

In 1963, an Austrian entomologist named Herbert Heran and the German behavioral scientist, Martin Lindauer, noticed something peculiar in the way honeybees zoom through the air.

When a selection of bees was trained to fly over a lake, they could only make it to the other side if there were waves and ripples on the surface of the water.

If the lake was mirror-smooth, on the other hand, the insects would suddenly lose altitude until they crashed headlong into the liquid-looking glass.

At the time, the findings supported the idea that honeybees use visual cues to navigate during flight, and a follow-up study has now added a fascinating insight into the flying strategies of these talented little aeronauts.

Replicating the 1963 experiment, albeit in a more ethical way, researchers have shown that honeybees watch the ground speeding below them to regulate their altitude in flight. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.sciencealert.com/honeybees-go-crashing-into-the-ground-if-they-fly-over-a-mirror
 
Bee careful when you're pruning trees.

A Texas landscaper died after being attacked by a giant swarm of bees as he hung suspended from a tree.

Franco Galvan Martinez, 53, disturbed the hive as he worked at a home in Austin, and accidentally kicked away the ladder beneath him, his family say.

“I guess in a panic trying to swat away the bees from himself, he kicked away the ladder,” Joe Maldonado, a family friend and pastor, told KXAN.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/texas-swarm-of-bees-attack-death-b2084428.html
 
Flying fish? Stingrays?

According to a state court judge in California, bees can be legally classified as fish.

This ruling reverses a lower court’s finding that bees cannot legally be classified as fish.

While seemingly farcical, this decision allows the state to list bee species as threatened or endangered under the California Endangered Species Act — under the category of “fish,” as defined in that legislation.

“It is a great day for California’s bumble bees,” said Pamela Flick from Defenders of Wildlife, one of the case’s intervenor defendants, via a press release.

“Today’s decision confirms that California Endangered Species Act protections apply to all of our state’s imperiled native species and is critical to protecting our state’s renown biodiversity.”

This is a breaking story, more to follow

https://news.yahoo.com/judge-rules-bees-legally-fish-175223336.html
 
Has anyone seen any stories of new "killer" bee swarms? My brother in law and sister own a farm and they hire people to help them. Usually in the spring there will be at least one swarm of bees and they scoop them up and put them in a bee box. Honey is a good money maker in that area so there are a lot of bee keepers. This year as usual there was a swarm and the guys got out the box and got the swarm in it. They left it and came back the next day to check on it and the bees came out angressive and angry, the men ran and as they went past the dog pen the dogs started barking (like dogs do) and the bees veered off and swarmed over the two bulldogs, the other dogs got away with a few stings but the bulldogs are dead. My brother in law had to kill the whole swarm as it seems they were not honey bees. They call these aggressive bees "africanized" bees, but how would they get to southern New Mexico?
 
Has anyone seen any stories of new "killer" bee swarms? My brother in law and sister own a farm and they hire people to help them. Usually in the spring there will be at least one swarm of bees and they scoop them up and put them in a bee box. Honey is a good money maker in that area so there are a lot of bee keepers. This year as usual there was a swarm and the guys got out the box and got the swarm in it. They left it and came back the next day to check on it and the bees came out angressive and angry, the men ran and as they went past the dog pen the dogs started barking (like dogs do) and the bees veered off and swarmed over the two bulldogs, the other dogs got away with a few stings but the bulldogs are dead. My brother in law had to kill the whole swarm as it seems they were not honey bees. They call these aggressive bees "africanized" bees, but how would they get to southern New Mexico?
They seem to have been introduced to Brazil originally and they are currently spreading into the USA.
Either this was an accident, or someone* is deliberately trying to damage America's agricultural ecosystem.

* A hostile foreign power, perhaps.
 
Flying fish? Stingrays?

According to a state court judge in California, bees can be legally classified as fish.

This ruling reverses a lower court’s finding that bees cannot legally be classified as fish.

While seemingly farcical, this decision allows the state to list bee species as threatened or endangered under the California Endangered Species Act — under the category of “fish,” as defined in that legislation.

“It is a great day for California’s bumble bees,” said Pamela Flick from Defenders of Wildlife, one of the case’s intervenor defendants, via a press release.

“Today’s decision confirms that California Endangered Species Act protections apply to all of our state’s imperiled native species and is critical to protecting our state’s renown biodiversity.”

This is a breaking story, more to follow

https://news.yahoo.com/judge-rules-bees-legally-fish-175223336.html
Scientific and legal conclusions are entirely different processes. The problem was with the original law that protected “birds, mammals, fish, amphibia or reptiles". Often, it's easier to get creative than to get a law changed.
 
I am a beekeeper and have seen some of these hybrid honeybees with African traits. They are very aggressive and persistent. They will produce massive amounts of honey compared with their tamer Italian cousins so they are tolerated up to a point. Once too far we euthanize the hive. If not too bad we re-Queen the hive to mellow them out.
 
An Omaha couple planted bee-friendly flowers around their vintage home. The bees found the environs so friendly they moved into the house's walls.
6,000 bees removed from inside wall of Omaha couple’s home

About 6,000 bees were recently removed from inside the walls of an Omaha couple’s 100-year-old home.

Thomas and Marylu Gouttierre told the Omaha World-Herald they have been planting bee-friendly flowers outside their midtown home, but they never expected the bees to move in.

The bees likely infiltrated through a hole in the mortar of its brick exterior. The Gouttierres discovered them after noticing many bees flying outside their kitchen window and found about 30 in a second-floor bedroom.

“If you put your ears to the wall you could hear the buzzing” ...

The couple contacted two members of the Omaha Bee Club who charged $600 to safely relocate the bees. Larry Cottle of Countryside Acres Aviary cut a hole in the wall of the home before Ryan Gilligan of Gilly’s Gold vacuumed the bees into a box to move them. Three honeycombs about 2 inches (5 centimeters) thick and roughly 9 inches (23 centimeters) in diameter were inside the wall. ...
FULL STORY: https://apnews.com/article/omaha-nebraska-bees-85318615181c08f16db4dee7bbbad880
 

The Queen’s Bees Have Been Informed of Her Passing


On Friday, John Chapple, the 79-year-old official Palace beekeeper, performed a sad, traditional task. It fell upon him to inform tens of thousands of bees about the death of Queen Elizabeth II. Chapple travelled to Buckingham Palace and Clarence House to perform his opposite-of-sweet duty. He spoke “in hushed tones,” no doubt to try and take the sting out of it.

iu


Chapple placed black ribbons around the hives, and then told the busy workers inside the news. He also explained that King Charles III is now their new master, and that he will be good to them.

“The person who has died is the master or mistress of the hives, someone important in the family who dies and you don’t get any more important than the Queen, do you?” Chapple said to the British newspaper. Getting into the nitty-gritty of it, he explained, “You knock on each hive and say, ‘The mistress is dead, but don't you go. Your master will be a good master to you.’”

In the thick of summer, Chapple, who has held his position for 15 years, cares for over a million Royal bees.

https://www.vanityfair.com/style/2022/09/the-queens-bees-have-been-informed-of-her-passing

maximus otter
 

The Queen’s Bees Have Been Informed of Her Passing


On Friday, John Chapple, the 79-year-old official Palace beekeeper, performed a sad, traditional task. It fell upon him to inform tens of thousands of bees about the death of Queen Elizabeth II. Chapple travelled to Buckingham Palace and Clarence House to perform his opposite-of-sweet duty. He spoke “in hushed tones,” no doubt to try and take the sting out of it.

iu


Chapple placed black ribbons around the hives, and then told the busy workers inside the news. He also explained that King Charles III is now their new master, and that he will be good to them.

“The person who has died is the master or mistress of the hives, someone important in the family who dies and you don’t get any more important than the Queen, do you?” Chapple said to the British newspaper. Getting into the nitty-gritty of it, he explained, “You knock on each hive and say, ‘The mistress is dead, but don't you go. Your master will be a good master to you.’”

In the thick of summer, Chapple, who has held his position for 15 years, cares for over a million Royal bees.

https://www.vanityfair.com/style/2022/09/the-queens-bees-have-been-informed-of-her-passing

maximus otter
Folklorist Mark Norman has spent a lot of time recently being interviewed by various newspapers about this.

Here is a link to Mark's book on the subject

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Telling-Bees-Other-Customs-Folklore/dp/0750992158

51FxLevlKyL._SX325_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
 
A house at the end of our road has started selling honey,
must ask them if it tastes of lavender as the lavender in
our garden always as bees buzzing about it, though
this year we don't seem to be seeing as many bees :(
 

The Queen’s Bees Have Been Informed of Her Passing


On Friday, John Chapple, the 79-year-old official Palace beekeeper, performed a sad, traditional task. It fell upon him to inform tens of thousands of bees about the death of Queen Elizabeth II. Chapple travelled to Buckingham Palace and Clarence House to perform his opposite-of-sweet duty. He spoke “in hushed tones,” no doubt to try and take the sting out of it.

iu


Chapple placed black ribbons around the hives, and then told the busy workers inside the news. He also explained that King Charles III is now their new master, and that he will be good to them.

“The person who has died is the master or mistress of the hives, someone important in the family who dies and you don’t get any more important than the Queen, do you?” Chapple said to the British newspaper. Getting into the nitty-gritty of it, he explained, “You knock on each hive and say, ‘The mistress is dead, but don't you go. Your master will be a good master to you.’”

In the thick of summer, Chapple, who has held his position for 15 years, cares for over a million Royal bees.

https://www.vanityfair.com/style/2022/09/the-queens-bees-have-been-informed-of-her-passing

maximus otter
It's also in a Father Brown story! I found that a fascinating custom. Delighted to hear it's still practiced!
 
I could have sworn this remarkable 2021 video and story had already been posted, but I couldn't locate any trace of it. This video from Brazil captured two bees working together to remove the cap from a soda bottle.

'Unbelievable' Video Shows 2 Bees Working Together to Open a Soda Bottle

A 2021 video, originally posted on Twitter, showed a pair of bees apparently unscrewing the orange lid of a Fanta to reach the sugary liquid inside.

In today's age of digital trickery, we have to be mindful that this could just be clever CGI; or, perhaps the bees really did work together, and simply toppled an already loosely perched bottle cap.

Either way, it's fun to think about whether bees would have the brains to pull off such a soda heist. ...

The smooth skill with which these two bees appear to twist the lid off a soda bottle baffled many on the internet, with some wondering how such intelligence exists in what is obviously a very tiny brain. ...

Despite having a noggin the size of a grass seed, roughly 0.0002 percent the size of our own, bees have proved surprisingly intelligent in recent research.

Not only can these insects learn from each other and use tools, but they can also count to zero and perform basic mathematical equations.

The question is, how would a tiny seed-sized calculator turn its problem-solving skills to something as complex as removing a cap from a soda bottle? ...

Unscrewing the cap of a sugary drink is hardly a job bees evolved to tackle in nature ... It's possible the bees just got lucky this time, detecting a sweet reward that drove them to wander somewhat blindly against a slight resistance.

On the other hand, nature could yet surprise us. In the packed bee brain, for instance, a single nerve cell can sometimes contact up to 100,000 other cells. ...

In a 2017 study, bumblebees were trained to roll a ball into a goal for a reward. To score, the insects needed to copy each others' movements and learn from their mistakes, which they were able to do with startling ease. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.sciencealert.com/unbelievable-video-shows-2-bees-working-together-to-open-a-soda-bottle
 
They should have just asked PJ Travers! :) Very interesting info being uncovered, Dr. Doolittle would approve.
https://www.noemamag.com/how-to-speak-honeybee/

How To Speak Honeybee​


Advanced technologies like A.I. are enabling scientists to learn that the world is full of intelligent creatures with sophisticated languages, like honeybees. What might they tell us?

Honeybee researchers following in Frisch’s footsteps have probed the magic well even more deeply. Bees make many other types of signals through nuanced movements, communicating through sounds and vibrations largely either inaudible to or indecipherable by humans. Moreover, by using computer software that automates the decoding of bee vibrations and sounds — vibroacoustics, as the field is known — researchers are now using algorithms to analyze bee signals. Their discoveries are as incredible as Frisch’s first breakthroughs.

Although it has been known for centuries that queens have their own vocabulary (including tooting and quacking sounds), researchers have found new worker bee signals, such as a hush (or stop) signal that can be tuned to specific types of threats and a whooping danger signal that can be elicited by a gentle knocking of the hive. Worker bees also make piping, begging and shaking signals that direct collective and individual behavior.

Perhaps the most remarkable research is that of Cornell bee scientist Thomas Seeley, who has demonstrated that honeybee language extends beyond foraging behavior. For several decades, Seeley focused his research on bee swarming. Swarming is the way honeybee colonies naturally reproduce; a single colony splits into two or more distinct colonies, and one group flies off to find a new home. How, Seeley wondered, did the colony decide on their preferred site?

When Seeley first decided to focus on swarming, scientists knew very little about the phenomenon. The fastest bees in a swarm fly over 20 miles per hour, usually moving in a straight line toward their target regardless of the fields, water bodies, buildings, hills or forests in their way. There is no way a human can keep up with the swarm, much less keep track of several thousand individual bees to figure out which ones, if any, are guiding the rest. Seeley was interested in how the bees decided which home to select — a high-stakes decision, given that splitting the hive could cause the queen to be lost, and choosing an inappropriate site could lead to the death of the hive.

In the mid-2000s, Seeley convinced a computer engineer who was intrigued by the similarities between bee swarms and driverless cars to install a high-powered video camera at Seeley’s research site on Appledore Island, off the coast of Maine. Their goal was to create an algorithm that could automatically identify and track some 10,000 speeding bees at once.
After two painstaking years, the algorithm finally worked: Powered by high-speed digital cameras and novel techniques in computer vision, it could identify each individual bee from the video footage and analyze its unique frenzied flight pattern. The algorithm revealed patterns undetectable to the human eye; decoding the diversity, density and interactions in these patterns led Seeley to label the swarm as a “cognitive entity.”

Perhaps Seeley’s most startling finding was that, in choosing a new home, honeybees exhibit sophisticated forms of democratic decision-making, including collective fact-finding, vigorous debate, consensus building, quorum and a complex stop signal enabling cross-inhibition, which prevents an impasse being reached. A bee swarm, in other words, is a remarkably effective democratic decision-making body in motion, which bears resemblance to some processes in the human brain and human society. Seeley went so far as to claim that the collective interactions of individual bees were strikingly similar to the interactions between our individual neurons when collectively arriving at a decision.

Seeley’s findings bolstered the arguments of those who argued in favor of referring to honeybee communication as language. And by demonstrating that the “hive mind” was more than mere metaphor, Seeley also stimulated advances in swarm intelligence in robotics and engineering. Seeley’s research, predicated on digital technology (computer vision and machine learning) eventually came full circle: His findings inspired computer scientists at Georgia Tech to create the Honey Bee algorithm, which is now an integral part of cloud computing: In internet hosting centers (analogous to hives), it optimizes the allocation of servers (foraging bees) among jobs (nectar sources), thereby helping to deal with sudden spikes in demand and preventing long queues. In 2016, Seeley and his collaborators were awarded the Golden Goose Award, which recognizes apparently esoteric research that later proves to be extremely valuable.
 
Hmmm, I can see anti-vaxxer bees telling their keepers to buzz off.

Commercial beekeepers in the United States will soon have access to a vaccine that could save their hives from the most devastating disease honeybees face today.

The medicine was designed by the biotech company Dalan Animal Health to ward off American foulbrood (AFB), a contagious condition caused by a spore-forming bacterium Paenibacillus larvae.

Incorporated into the feed of a hive's worker bees, the oral vaccine is transferred into the 'royal jelly', which is fed to the queen.

The pathogen has only one known host: honeybee larvae. Once it infects a hive, it is notoriously difficult to eradicate. The only effective way to get rid of the bacteria for good is to send everything up in flames: the hive, the tools, and the bees themselves.

Any spores that don't burn can remain viable for 70 years or more, ready to infect the next colony that comes their way. Tragically, the bacteria can overcome an entire hive in as little as three weeks, leaving bee keepers little time to respond.

In 2022, Dalan sponsored a placebo-controlled trial on the safety and efficacy of the vaccine with great results. Not only did the medicine protect workers and the queen from dying of AFB disease in testing, it also bestowed immunity to the next generation by working in the royal's ovaries.

https://www.sciencealert.com/us-approves-first-vaccine-for-bees-amid-global-pollinator-crisis
 
Hmmm, I can see anti-vaxxer bees telling their keepers to buzz off.

Commercial beekeepers in the United States will soon have access to a vaccine that could save their hives from the most devastating disease honeybees face today.

The medicine was designed by the biotech company Dalan Animal Health to ward off American foulbrood (AFB), a contagious condition caused by a spore-forming bacterium Paenibacillus larvae.

Incorporated into the feed of a hive's worker bees, the oral vaccine is transferred into the 'royal jelly', which is fed to the queen.

The pathogen has only one known host: honeybee larvae. Once it infects a hive, it is notoriously difficult to eradicate. The only effective way to get rid of the bacteria for good is to send everything up in flames: the hive, the tools, and the bees themselves.

Any spores that don't burn can remain viable for 70 years or more, ready to infect the next colony that comes their way. Tragically, the bacteria can overcome an entire hive in as little as three weeks, leaving bee keepers little time to respond.

In 2022, Dalan sponsored a placebo-controlled trial on the safety and efficacy of the vaccine with great results. Not only did the medicine protect workers and the queen from dying of AFB disease in testing, it also bestowed immunity to the next generation by working in the royal's ovaries.

https://www.sciencealert.com/us-approves-first-vaccine-for-bees-amid-global-pollinator-crisis

Maybe the vaccine is causing the hyperventilation?

AUSTIN—Like most bees, bumble bees are having a tough time. Pesticides, habitat loss, light pollution, and parasites have caused steep declines in their populations, upward of 75% in the few places researchers have tracked the insects for long periods of time. Now, scientists have identified a new way global warming may be taking a toll on some of these key pollinators.

Rising temperatures are forcing some bees to take shallow, rapid breaths—essentially hyperventilating—which burns more energy and makes them less likely to survive, according to research presented here last week at the annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology.

The study “showed pretty nicely that different [bumble bee] species have different vulnerabilities to climate change,” says John Hranitz, an ecological geneticist who studies bees at Bloomsburg University but who was not involved with the work. ...

https://www.science.org/content/article/some-bumble-bees-may-be-hyperventilating-world-warms
 
Couple survive swarm attack of 10,000 bees - but left with stings all over their bodies

Pruan Punta, 73, and his wife Saisuda Kwai-aun, 53, were sitting under a mango tree in front of their home in northern Tak province, Thailand, when a swarm of about 10,000 angry bees descended upon them.

The insects started divebombing the terrified couple, stinging them all over their bodies.

Pruan jumped into the nearby Ping River to avoid the stings, but his unfortunate wife, who suffered partial paralysis, was unable to escape and had to endure the full force of the bees' attack.

With the crazed swarm still following him, Pruan emerged from the water and ran 500 meters to his neighbor's house, where he called for help.

Rescuers had to wear motorcycle helmets and protective PPE suits left over from the pandemic before bundling the couple into an ambulance. Bizarrely, the bees ignored the rescuers completely and continued assaulting the couple.

The couple was rushed to the nearby Ban Tak Hospital for treatment, where doctors had to remove dozens of stingers embedded painfully in their faces.

Speaking to local media on Thursday, Saisuda said: 'The bees stung me mostly in my face and limbs. It hurt but I couldn't do anything since I couldn't run away.

'The pain was intense. I just remember fainting and I couldn't move.’

It is believed the swarm had been driven towards the residential area after recent forest fires burned their natural habitat in northern Thailand.

The fire also destroyed all of the beehives in the area. The massive swarm of wild bees was likely frightened and escaped from the forest, making their way to the residential area, where they attacked the couple.

Fires caused by out-of-control agricultural burning have been raging this week in the Doi Soi Malai National Park on the Thanon Thong Chai mountain range, damaging trees and bushland.

Wildlife rescue worker Apirak Phunuan, who attended the scene, said he believes the change in the climate and the smoke has caused the bees to behave differently.

He said: 'The fires have forced the bees out of their hives in the woods. This kind of incident is very rare. It's not normal for the bees. They became aggressive because of the flames and smoke.'
1677285565330.png
 
Four stung to death by bees after horror 165ft bus crash

An eight-year-old girl was among four people stung to death by a huge swarm of bees after the bus they were travelling in fell 165ft into a ravine.

More than 40 people were on the bus when it crashed on Monday in the San Sebastian De Yali area of Nicaragua in Central America.

All 45 passengers reportedly survived the initial crash, local media reports claim but four people - including the little girl - were stung repeatedly by the angry bees in the ditch moments later.

The bus hit the beehives and ended up stricken in a coffee plantation.
 

This report says eight people died.

45 out of the 60 bus passengers, as well as the driver, were stung, and locals who tried to rescue trapped passengers had to stop because of the presence of the bees.

At least 14 passengers, including a four-year-old boy and a pregnant woman, were hospitalised.

African honey bees are considered an invasive species in South America.

They’re more defensive, react faster, and chase people further than other varieties of honey bees.

Their venom is the same strength as in European honey bees, but because they sting in far greater numbers African honey bees have far more deaths attributed to them.

However they are the dominant type of honey bee for beekeeping in Central and South America, due to their genetic dominance and ability to out-perform European bees.


1683805764170.png
 
Bad beehaviour in sting operation.

Police make arrest and are swarmed by bees​

Newly released bodycam footage showed officers in the Seattle Police Department being swarmed by bees while responding to a call about a potential carjacking.

Police had chased the man and pushed him into bushes, apparently disturbing a bee nest.

The suspect, who was stung along with the officers, received medical attention before he was booked into King County Jail.

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-us-canada-66885626
 
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