Kids Today

huddsy

Junior Acolyte
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
34
Likes
24
Points
9
I was out for a meal recently an there was an occurrence which attracted my attention because it was so unusual. There was a family of five sitting at a nearby table. Mother, father and three daughters ranging in age from about 6 to 10. The youngest asked if they might go out to play before the meal came. The father said no. The three girls sat there all quietly playing on phones. (Yes, even with THIS family they were there). The meal arrived. The phones were put away. After the meal the eldest daughter got up, unprompted, and placed all the dirty plates into a neat pile for the waitress to remove. Then they all sat there behaving themselves waiting for the dessert to arrive. It must have been a sight worth commenting on because I'm doing just that now.
 

escargot

Beloved of Ra
Joined
Aug 24, 2001
Messages
23,461
Likes
15,491
Points
309
Well....I wasn't being entirely serious....

But I do think it's wrong to assume that young people using phones constantly is a bad thing. It's not a passive activity, it's far more interactive than spending hours watching TV. It can be negative, but there are positives too - they are potentially communicating with a much wider group of people; creating their own videos, blogs, photography, music; making new connections...

Like I say, all of these can have negative aspects...but I was a curious child, and if I'd had a pocket window to the entire breadth of recorded human knowledge and culture, I would have been glued to it too.
You're right, but there's a time and a place NOT to be doing this. Walking down the road or cycling are not ideal! :eek:
 

huddsy

Junior Acolyte
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
34
Likes
24
Points
9
Well....I wasn't being entirely serious....

But I do think it's wrong to assume that young people using phones constantly is a bad thing. It's not a passive activity, it's far more interactive than spending hours watching TV. It can be negative, but there are positives too - they are potentially communicating with a much wider group of people; creating their own videos, blogs, photography, music; making new connections...

Like I say, all of these can have negative aspects...but I was a curious child, and if I'd had a pocket window to the entire breadth of recorded human knowledge and culture, I would have been glued to it too.
Yes but deprive them of this phone and they can't do anything. We've already agreed that telling the time is beyond them. I expect adding up and map reading is as well. It's the dependency on the phone that is the problem.
 

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
3,298
Likes
5,417
Points
234
A few months ago someone brought his young daughter to the rifle range l attend. After her turn shooting she went to the seats at the back of the range, retrieved a book and sat reading intently, awaiting her next detail. I could have hugged her, except l didn’t want to end up on a Register for ten years...

maximus otter
 

huddsy

Junior Acolyte
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
34
Likes
24
Points
9
A few months ago someone brought his young daughter to the rifle range l attend. After her turn shooting she went to the seats at the back of the range, retrieved a book and sat reading intently, awaiting her next detail. I could have hugged her, except l didn’t want to end up on a Register for ten years...

maximus otter
:rollingw:
Stories like this fill me with hope. All is clearly not lost........
 
Joined
Dec 12, 2014
Messages
3,344
Likes
3,513
Points
154
Location
Larch Forest
Yes but deprive them of this phone and they can't do anything. We've already agreed that telling the time is beyond them. I expect adding up and map reading is as well. It's the dependency on the phone that is the problem.
Well...not all of them. After all, it's not that difficult. I can distinctly remember realising that I'd learned how to read a clock face and being quite excited at acquirring such a grown-up skill - an even bigger milestone than learning to tie my own shoelaces - once I'd understood that there were sixty minutes in an hour it wasn't much of a leap to see that the fast moving hand represented the minutes and the slow one the hours. Mind you, I couldn't believe at first that I'd stumbled upon the solution as it seemed too simple, and for a while I wondered if I'd got it wrong and there was actually more to time telling than my young mind was able to grasp. :)

My point is, even if using an analogue clock isn't a necessary skill it's not hard to work out almost by accident.

If I spot any children with analogue watches I'll make a note of it.

Afterthought: There is of course a huge choice of attractive analogue clock apps and widgets for smartphones and computers and these are very popular. I'd assume their use isn't restricted just to those of us who can remember Tiswas.
 
Last edited:

huddsy

Junior Acolyte
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
34
Likes
24
Points
9
Having the ability to do maths such as long division gave us a familiarity with working with numbers that they don't have today.
 

Shadowsot

Ephemeral Spectre
Joined
Apr 24, 2009
Messages
339
Likes
317
Points
69
Was listening to No Such thing as a Fish, and one of the facts mentioned in the show was that over time children's self control has increased.
Not by a lot, but averaging out to six seconds a generation.
Interesting, though seeing the way games like mine craft work I can believe it. A friend's ten year old showed me the complex machinery he'd put together in the game.
Kind of runs against the idea that kids are getting less focused.

As for books, it was a slow process, but these days I now read from my phone almost exclusively. I have a small library of books and audiobook, and just can't fit paperbacks in my jeans like I used to.
And since they stopped making pants with ridiculous picket sizes, hardcovers are a lost cause.
 

Spudrick68

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
2,346
Likes
1,451
Points
169
I used simple maths at work but what seems logical to me seems like magic to some youngsters. Some ask how I worked something out. An older person, for example, if asked to calculate 11 x 16 in their head would in all likelihood times the 16 by 10 and then take off 16. Perhaps new methods of teaching don't allow kids to do that.
 

GNC

King-Sized Canary
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Messages
25,680
Likes
9,422
Points
284
How I learned to multiply a double digit number by 11 is to add the two numerals and put them in the middle. So 11x16=176 because 1+6=7, and that 7 goes between the 1 and 6.
 
Top