Newly Discovered: Previously Disputed Or Merely Alleged Species

Cochise

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#93
How about a parasitic wasp that saws its way out of the host? ...



FULL STORY (With Photo): https://www.livescience.com/61600-slasher-wasp-with-body-saw.html

JOURNAL ARTICLE: https://bdj.pensoft.net/article/22676/
The reproductive cycles of the more parasitic insects require either a strong stomach or a limited imagination among the researchers. I remember being startled by a book on North American insects - I only wanted to know which ones would poison me, but I ended up reading on in horrified fascination.
 

Jim

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#94
Speaking about parasitic wasp, the "Tarantula Hawk". This wasp is has the most painful sting of the creepy crawly's. It strings the tarantula then lays an egg(s) inside the poor paralyzed creature.
 
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#95
Speaking about parasitic wasp, the "Tarantula Hawk". This wasp is has the most painful sting of the creepy crawly's. It strings the tarantula then lays an egg(s) inside the poor paralyzed creature.
Just thinking of a giant one of those in an SF/Horror Film really the business!
 

Brig

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#96
Contrary to what the site implied; the monkys were only interested in other monkeys. They did not mate with foreign animals. Unlike the creepy jerk in our town who bought a German Shephard dog for his purpose. Luckily a few locals ran the deviant out of the area.
 

oldrover

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#97
Contrary to what the site implied; the monkys were only interested in other monkeys. They did not mate with foreign animals. Unlike the creepy jerk in our town who bought a German Shephard dog for his purpose. Luckily a few locals ran the deviant out of the area.
Actually no, Iwon't ask.
 

Dr_Baltar

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Contrary to what the site implied; the monkys were only interested in other monkeys. They did not mate with foreign animals.
You must have missed this bit:

"There’s also the macaque, which has been spotted having sex with deer numerous times."
 

Yossarian

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There was an extraordinary paper written a while back on macaque/deer sexual habits, and whether they represented some kind of inter-species social function. Never got my head around it.

Up until a couple of years ago, I worked in a zoo, and the alpha male Orangutan - not a monkey, I know - had (before my time) once apparently had his way with a pigeon, which can't have been a pretty sight.
 

Brig

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Dr. Baltar did you bother to read the article? They implied one thing in the head but the story did not verify it. That there are sex deviants among simians is no surprise. Humans are discustingly also included. But said story was simply about "red" and "blue" monkeys. It said nothing about other animals.
 

Brig

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Dr. Baltar did you bother to read the article? They implied one thing in the head but the story did not verify it. That there are sex deviants among simians is no surprise. Humans are discustingly also included. But said story was simply about "red" and "blue" monkeys. It said nothing about other animals.
 

Dr_Baltar

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Dr. Baltar did you bother to read the article? They implied one thing in the head but the story did not verify it. That there are sex deviants among simians is no surprise. Humans are discustingly also included. But said story was simply about "red" and "blue" monkeys. It said nothing about other animals.
Apart from the line in the article I quoted (after I'd read the article).
 
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A little snake but venomous.

July 16 (UPI) -- Already home to some of the most venomous creatures in the world, northern Australia's wilderness just got a little bit more dangerous.

Scientists have discovered a new species of bandy-bandy snake, Vermicella parscauda, on a remote peninsula in Australia's Far North.

Biologists from the University of Queensland discovered the snake by chance while conducting a sea snake survey. The species is reactively small and narrow. It's scales are black with white stripes.

"Bandy-bandy is a burrowing snake, so Freek Vonk from the Naturalis Museum and I were surprised to find it on a concrete block by the sea," Bryan Fry, an associate professor at Queensland, said in a news release. "We later discovered that the snake had slithered over from a pile of bauxite rubble waiting to be loaded onto a ship."

https://www.upi.com/New-venomous-snake-species-found-in-Australia/6791531744709/
 

Mikefule

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"...Freek Vonk from the Naturalis Museum and I were surprised to find it on a concrete block by the sea," Bryan Fry, an associate professor at Queensland, said in a news release.
Yes, if I found a previously unknown venomous snake, I'd react with some degree of surprise too. I might even go so far as to say I was startled.
 

Xanatic*

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They should really have named the snake after Freek Vonk, that is an excellent name.
 
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Could even be a source of antibiotics.

Video: Newly discovered rare deepwater coral identified off Irish coast
A type of “black coral” identified may be an entirely new species, says Marine Institute
about 23 hours ago Updated: about 2 hours ago

Gardens of rare and newly discovered deepwater coral and an entire reef of sponges have been identified off the Irish west coast by a team of Irish and British scientists.

A type of “black coral” identified on the mission may be an entirely new species, according to Marine Institute lead expedition scientist David O’Sullivan and Prof Louise Allcock of NUI Galway.

Mr O’Sullivan notes too that the sponge reef is the first habitat of its type discovered in Irish waters, and matched only by a similar reef in Canadian waters.

Plymouth University scientist Dr Kerry Howell says she hasn’t seen a sponge reef like it in 20 years of studying the deep north-east Atlantic, and says that such features may provide a new source of antibiotics.


https://www.irishtimes.com/news/sci...er-coral-identified-off-irish-coast-1.3573795
 

oldrover

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Aha! Makes finding a Tas wolf all the more possible; doesn't it?
Nope. This has no connection with the thylacine at all, an animal whose extinction is very well documented. However if you Google Sailugem bear, all you get is various re-syndication if this article from the Siberian Times, the world's least plausibke newspaper. It's an advert for Kaichi Travel, the tour comoany who supposedly came up with the photo. There's nothing unusual about this bear's colour, nor is there any way of telling where this photo was taken.
 
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