Newly Discovered: Previously Disputed Or Merely Alleged Species

A

Anonymous

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#1
purple necked

has any one got a link to a site which may have a piccy of this on?

cheers
cas


ananova.com/news/story/sm_425480.html
Link is dead. The MIA article is archived at the Wayback Machine:

https://web.archive.org/web/2004020...ml?menu=news.scienceanddiscovery.naturalworld

Here's the full text of the MIA article:
Purple-necked Wallaby exists say Aussie experts

Scientists in Australia say a mysterious purple kangaroo, thought to be a legend, does actually exist.

A biologist named Le Souf claimed to have discovered the species in 1924, but experts ignored his claims.

Researchers from Macquarie University in Sydney now say the wallaby does exist and has purple around its neck and on its face.

They have called it the purple-necked rock wallaby.

It is not yet known how and why the purple pigment is produced, but it has been found to wash off in rain before reappearing.

Department of Biological Sciences researcher Dr Mark Eldridge said further research was needed to determine how widespread the species is and to discover the secrets of its colouration.

He said: "No one believed [Le Souf], everyone just said, 'No, they can't have purple necks, they must be rubbing themselves on some rock and getting this funny colouration'."

"Because it is secreted through the skin, once the animal is dead the pigment rapidly fades, so by the time Le Souf got the specimens back to Brisbane or Sydney from North Queensland, the colour had gone.

"It just looked like a very plain, normal-looking rock wallaby."

Using genetic technology, the Macquarie University team found the animal was an entirely new species.

They know it comes from a gland, but biological studies have yet to determine whether the gland is unique in this animal and, if it is common, why in this particular animal it is purple, reports Australia's Daily Telegraph.
 
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ruffready

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#2
Carcass of unknown animal found


The skeletal remains of an animal found on the coast here has caused a stir among villagers at Kampung Pengkalan Sungai Udang in Telok Gong. Fishermen looking for worms for bait near Pulau Carey spotted the rotting carcass embedded in mud over a week ago, but parts of the remains were only taken to the village two days ago.

Arbain Salleh, who recovered the remains, said it was not an animal he had ever seen before.

"I’ve been fishing in these waters for more than 20 years but I never came across an animal like this," he said.

picture here .. http://www.nst.com.my/Current_News/nst/ ... index_html


also, I checked for previous strange finds in area and found this (which was eventually identified)
looks like the same as above , though above latest picture is cut off at the head (piss poor picture!!)

http://www.parascope.com/en/cryptozoo/aquarium10.htm
 
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#3
Giant killer lizard fossil shines new light on early Australians

As if life wasn’t hard enough during the last Ice Age, research led by the University of Queensland has found Australia’s first human inhabitants had to contend with giant killer lizards.

UQ vertebrate palaeoecologist Dr Gilbert Price said researchers working in Central Queensland were amazed when they unearthed the first evidence that Australia’s early human inhabitants and giant apex predator lizards had overlapped.


“Our jaws dropped when we found a tiny fossil from a giant lizard during a two metre deep excavation in one of the Capricorn Caves, near Rockhampton,” Dr Price said.

“The one-centimetre bone, an osteoderm, came from under the lizard’s skin and is the youngest record of a giant lizard on the entire continent.”

Osteoderm (skin bone) of the giant monitor lizard from Colosseum Chamber at the Capricorn Caves. Credit: Gilbert Price

Dr Price and his colleagues used radiocarbon and uranium thorium techniques to date the bone as about 50,000 years old, coinciding with the arrival of Australia’s Aboriginal inhabitants.

“We can’t tell if the bone is from a Komodo dragon — which once roamed Australia — or an even bigger species like the extinct Megalania monitor lizard, which weighed about 500kg and grew up to six metres long,” Dr Price said.


Read more at http://www.deepstuff.org/giant-kill...ght-on-early-australians/#8w4wmfK56oqwZ8R9.99
 
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lordmongrove

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Its known only from fragmentary remains such as vertebra and skull fragments but when compared with the largest Komodo dragons they yield estimated lengths of 23-30 feet for adults. Ralph Moliner's Dragons in rthe Dust is an excellent overview.
Many of these creatures (like Gigantopithicus) are known only from fragments however in some cases more is discovered years later as with Deinocherius , once known only from its 8 foot arms and wrongly imagined as a macro-preditor.
 

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#8
Read more at http://www.deepstuff.org/giant-kill...ght-on-early-australians/#8w4wmfK56oqwZ8R9.99[/QUOTE]
Merged. It was already posted here.

If you have more material about Aborigines living alongside extinct predators it would be worth splitting the posts off into a new thread.
Its known only from fragmentary remains such as vertebra and skull fragments but when compared with the largest Komodo dragons they yield estimated lengths of 23-30 feet for adults. Ralph Moliner's Dragons in rthe Dust is an excellent overview.
Many of these creatures (like Gigantopithicus) are known only from fragments however in some cases more is discovered years later as with Deinocherius , once known only from its 8 foot arms and wrongly imagined as a macro-preditor.
The bones of Megalania, the ~23’ long Australian apex predator were found that were likely only 300 years old. Previous est. say the animal went extinct before the end of the last ice age.
Some claim it’s a cryptid that still may be alive although you’d think, however it would be hard to miss at ~ 8 times the volume of the Komodo Dragon, but?

http://www.epicadamwildlife.com/2014/07/16/giant-ripper-lizard/

 
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#9


The bones of Megalania, the ~23’ long Australian apex predator were found that were likely only 300 years old. Previous est. say the animal went extinct before the end of the last ice age.
Some claim it’s a cryptid that still may be alive although you’d think, however it would be hard to miss at ~ 8 times the volume of the Komodo Dragon, but?

http://www.epicadamwildlife.com/2014/07/16/giant-ripper-lizard/

[/QUOTE]
If it's that big you'd be able to see it with a satellite. My small saloon car is visible on google earth, parked on my drive and that's grey.
 

PeteByrdie

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#10
The bones of Megalania, the ~23’ long Australian apex predator were found that were likely only 300 years old. Previous est. say the animal went extinct before the end of the last ice age.
Some claim it’s a cryptid that still may be alive although you’d think, however it would be hard to miss at ~ 8 times the volume of the Komodo Dragon, but?

http://www.epicadamwildlife.com/2014/07/16/giant-ripper-lizard/

If it's that big you'd be able to see it with a satellite. My small saloon car is visible on google earth, parked on my drive and that's grey.[/QUOTE]
Isn't it a myth that Google use satellites for those images? I thought they just flew planes over.
 
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#11
If it's that big you'd be able to see it with a satellite. My small saloon car is visible on google earth, parked on my drive and that's grey.
Isn't it a myth that Google use satellites for those images? I thought they just flew planes over.[/QUOTE]
...Possibly. But my point is the same. You could fly a plane about and spot them - although I suspect there are satellites that can read the newspaper over your shoulder on a good day.
 

Monstrosa

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#12
If it's that big you'd be able to see it with a satellite. My small saloon car is visible on google earth, parked on my drive and that's grey.
Isn't it a myth that Google use satellites for those images? I thought they just flew planes over.
Purchase and read Journal of Cryptozoology vol 3. There is an article on using fine-resolution satellite imagery as a tool in cryptozoology. You'll get an answer there.
 

PeteByrdie

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Isn't it a myth that Google use satellites for those images? I thought they just flew planes over.
...Possibly. But my point is the same. You could fly a plane about and spot them - although I suspect there are satellites that can read the newspaper over your shoulder on a good day.[/QUOTE]
I did think, when I first heard about the possibility of megalania's survival, that many people travel the outback by plane, and something so large might struggle to remain hidden. But Mungoman and other forteans of Oz would have a better idea about such things than I.

Also, a syntax error earlier in the thread is screwing up our quotes.:p
 

Quake42

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#14
The bones of Megalania, the ~23’ long Australian apex predator were found that were likely only 300 years old. Previous est. say the animal went extinct before the end of the last ice age.
Some claim it’s a cryptid that still may be alive although you’d think, however it would be hard to miss at ~ 8 times the volume of the Komodo Dragon, but?
FOAF alert - but bear with me. There was a programme on last night about the Komodo dragon. My Antipodean flatmate casually mentioned that, on a long outback drive (possibly the Nullarbor) an Aussie friend of hers had seen a "lace monitor" that spanned the width of the road. She apparently stopped the car and the lizard eventually shuffled off, slowly.

She knew nothing of Megalania, but I thought it was worth repeating here. I think she may have mentioned the story before in passing, but it had slipped my mind.
 

GNC

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#15
Sounds like that Nessie sighting that slithered across the road back in the 1930s(?). Is this a new crypto anecdote archetype? Sort of the giant beastie equivalent of the vanishing hitchhiker?
 

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#16
No the Megalania rumor has been around for hundreds of years and considering the vastness of the outback and the fact that bones only dating back 300 years not before the end of the last ice age make it a valid cryptic. Unlike Nessie which doesn't have the food supply for such a large aquatic beast in Lock Ness. Giant monitors are also rumored to exist in new Guinea and the Congo basin. Numerous treads exist on both the New Guinea dragon and Australian crpytid.
 

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#17
These tiny beetles have evolved to ride ants like horses
Newly discovered beetle species lives secretly among the army ants of Costa Rica.

Researchers Christoph von Beeren and Alexey K. Tishechkin just identified a tiny beetle they've named Nymphister kronaueri that keeps up with the army ants' endless march in an unusual way. N. kronaueri clamps onto an army ant's back with its mandibles, as if it were a soldier going into battle on the back of the most magnificent steed in the world. Von Beeren and Tishechkin describe the strange life of N. kronaueri in a paper for BMC Zoology, and they explain how these animals evolved to live among creatures who would normally gorge themselves upon their beetle guts.

Insects and other creatures who live among ants are called myrmecophiles, which literally means ant lovers. Myrmecophiles stand to gain a lot from this strange relationship. Certainly they can feed off the colony's leftovers in the wake of a raid, but there's more to the relationship than that. Ants create a pleasant environment, much like a human city that attracts wild animals. The researchers write:

Life in and around ant colonies is expected to be beneficial for arthropod guests, especially those that have managed to get along well with ants. Among the latter are highly integrated species that inhabit ant nests, in which they are protected from their own predators, live in a stable microclimate, and have access to rich food sources.

Because ant colonies are such nice places to live, myrmecophiles evolved early. Some species have been following ants around for 50 million years.



Enlarge / Above, you can see N. kronaueri attached to the ant's back and using its mandibles to grip between the second and third segments of the ant's body. Below, a close-up of the beetle's mandibles clamped on.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/02/these-beetles-ride-like-cowboys-on-the-backs-of-army-ants/
 

oldrover

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#18
Contrary to what the site implied; the monkys were only interested in other monkeys. They did not mate with foreign animals. Unlike the creepy jerk in our town who bought a German Shephard dog for his purpose. Luckily a few locals ran the deviant out of the area.
Actually no, Iwon't ask.
 

Brig

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#20
Dr. Baltar did you bother to read the article? They implied one thing in the head but the story did not verify it. That there are sex deviants among simians is no surprise. Humans are discustingly also included. But said story was simply about "red" and "blue" monkeys. It said nothing about other animals.
 

Dr_Baltar

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Dr. Baltar did you bother to read the article? They implied one thing in the head but the story did not verify it. That there are sex deviants among simians is no surprise. Humans are discustingly also included. But said story was simply about "red" and "blue" monkeys. It said nothing about other animals.
Apart from the line in the article I quoted (after I'd read the article).
 

oldrover

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#24
Aha! Makes finding a Tas wolf all the more possible; doesn't it?
Nope. This has no connection with the thylacine at all, an animal whose extinction is very well documented. However if you Google Sailugem bear, all you get is various re-syndication if this article from the Siberian Times, the world's least plausibke newspaper. It's an advert for Kaichi Travel, the tour comoany who supposedly came up with the photo. There's nothing unusual about this bear's colour, nor is there any way of telling where this photo was taken.
 
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AlchoPwn

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#26
I'm glad you said this. I cringe at every reference to that site. Ridiculous stuff.
Agreed. The number of times you go "reference diving" and come up with Siberian Times. It makes me throw up in my mouth a little bit.
 

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#27
You mean the Siberian Times beats out America's" Star" for lunacy? It must be a real nutcase. I've never even seen a Siberian Times ... lucky me.
 
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#28
An interesting new salamander.

Need proof Florida is truly the weirdest state of the Union?

Just look at one of its latest discoveries: A giant salamander that is spotted like a leopard and has fronds resembling a Christmas tree on its head. The scientific journal PLOS One published a study about the supersized salamander on Wednesday. The salamander, officially called the “reticulated siren,” measures up to 2 feet in length when fully grown, and are completely aquatic, according to National Geographic.

David Steen, a wildlife ecologist at the Georgia Sea Turtle Center who discovered the creature said its existence has been rumored for decades.
“It was basically this mythical beast,” Steen told National Geographic. He first saw the creature in 2009, but his team wasn’t able to find other samples for another five years. An official study was finally completed in 2018 and just published in PLOS ONE.

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/reticulated-siren-salamander-weird-florida_us_5c0853b3e4b0bf813ef3d0a9?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=__TheMorningEmail__120618&utm_content=__TheMorningEmail__120618+CID_b2f8747eaa8e9dcdb121f48bf55b4274&utm_source=Email marketing software&utm_term=giant leopard-spotted salamander&ncid=newsltushpmgnews__TheMorningEmail__120618
 
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Bullseye

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#29
So with this one and the Hellbender (up to 70cm) found in some Eastern States of US, the Chinese Giant Salamander (historically up to 1.8m) and the Japanese Giant Salamander (historically up to 1.5m). Now if someone could have a good old look about for the giant salamander reported from the Pacific North West States (alleged up to 2m) that would be great !. Looked at geographically it makes sense.
 

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#30
So with this one and the Hellbender (up to 70cm) found in some Eastern States of US, the Chinese Giant Salamander (historically up to 1.8m) and the Japanese Giant Salamander (historically up to 1.5m). Now if someone could have a good old look about for the giant salamander reported from the Pacific North West States (alleged up to 2m) that would be great !. Looked at geographically it makes sense.
No such "known" salamander exist in North America. The eastern Hellbender is our largest and can approach 29" (0.98 m). We also have the mudpuppy up to 16" (0.49 m) which I've seen while fishing.
 
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