Newly Discovered: Previously Disputed Or Merely Alleged Species

Brig

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#61
Dr. Baltar did you bother to read the article? They implied one thing in the head but the story did not verify it. That there are sex deviants among simians is no surprise. Humans are discustingly also included. But said story was simply about "red" and "blue" monkeys. It said nothing about other animals.
 

Brig

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#62
Dr. Baltar did you bother to read the article? They implied one thing in the head but the story did not verify it. That there are sex deviants among simians is no surprise. Humans are discustingly also included. But said story was simply about "red" and "blue" monkeys. It said nothing about other animals.
 

Dr_Baltar

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#63
Dr. Baltar did you bother to read the article? They implied one thing in the head but the story did not verify it. That there are sex deviants among simians is no surprise. Humans are discustingly also included. But said story was simply about "red" and "blue" monkeys. It said nothing about other animals.
Apart from the line in the article I quoted (after I'd read the article).
 
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#64
A little snake but venomous.

July 16 (UPI) -- Already home to some of the most venomous creatures in the world, northern Australia's wilderness just got a little bit more dangerous.

Scientists have discovered a new species of bandy-bandy snake, Vermicella parscauda, on a remote peninsula in Australia's Far North.

Biologists from the University of Queensland discovered the snake by chance while conducting a sea snake survey. The species is reactively small and narrow. It's scales are black with white stripes.

"Bandy-bandy is a burrowing snake, so Freek Vonk from the Naturalis Museum and I were surprised to find it on a concrete block by the sea," Bryan Fry, an associate professor at Queensland, said in a news release. "We later discovered that the snake had slithered over from a pile of bauxite rubble waiting to be loaded onto a ship."

https://www.upi.com/New-venomous-snake-species-found-in-Australia/6791531744709/
 

Mikefule

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#67
"...Freek Vonk from the Naturalis Museum and I were surprised to find it on a concrete block by the sea," Bryan Fry, an associate professor at Queensland, said in a news release.
Yes, if I found a previously unknown venomous snake, I'd react with some degree of surprise too. I might even go so far as to say I was startled.
 

Xanatic*

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#68
They should really have named the snake after Freek Vonk, that is an excellent name.
 
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#70
Could even be a source of antibiotics.

Video: Newly discovered rare deepwater coral identified off Irish coast
A type of “black coral” identified may be an entirely new species, says Marine Institute
about 23 hours ago Updated: about 2 hours ago

Gardens of rare and newly discovered deepwater coral and an entire reef of sponges have been identified off the Irish west coast by a team of Irish and British scientists.

A type of “black coral” identified on the mission may be an entirely new species, according to Marine Institute lead expedition scientist David O’Sullivan and Prof Louise Allcock of NUI Galway.

Mr O’Sullivan notes too that the sponge reef is the first habitat of its type discovered in Irish waters, and matched only by a similar reef in Canadian waters.

Plymouth University scientist Dr Kerry Howell says she hasn’t seen a sponge reef like it in 20 years of studying the deep north-east Atlantic, and says that such features may provide a new source of antibiotics.


https://www.irishtimes.com/news/sci...er-coral-identified-off-irish-coast-1.3573795
 

Brig

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#73
Which makes me wonder what else is being rejuvenated from the frozen far north. Mammoths...yes; bacteria NO. Or frozen south for that matter.
 

oldrover

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#79
Aha! Makes finding a Tas wolf all the more possible; doesn't it?
Nope. This has no connection with the thylacine at all, an animal whose extinction is very well documented. However if you Google Sailugem bear, all you get is various re-syndication if this article from the Siberian Times, the world's least plausibke newspaper. It's an advert for Kaichi Travel, the tour comoany who supposedly came up with the photo. There's nothing unusual about this bear's colour, nor is there any way of telling where this photo was taken.
 
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AlchoPwn

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#81
I'm glad you said this. I cringe at every reference to that site. Ridiculous stuff.
Agreed. The number of times you go "reference diving" and come up with Siberian Times. It makes me throw up in my mouth a little bit.
 

Brig

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#83
You mean the Siberian Times beats out America's" Star" for lunacy? It must be a real nutcase. I've never even seen a Siberian Times ... lucky me.
 

Mikefule

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#86
Wow, that raises some random thoughts.

The orange cave dwelling dwarf crocodile: what is its armour class? how many hit points? How much damage does it do? Does it sit coiled on a hoard of gold and gems?

More seriously* the way to tell the difference between a crocodile and an alligator (apart from whether you see it later or after a while) is the length of the snout. The apparent difference between the dwarf crocodile and the orange cave dwelling dwarf crocodile is the width of the band of gaffer tape keeping its jaws shut. (Well, that and the whole being orange and living in a cave thing.) I can see why they tape up the jaws for handling these beasts, but whose job is it to remove the tape? Scope here for bullying the unpopular intern, I think.

Genuinely seriously: interesting that scientists made an initial assumption that the orange cave dwelling ones were ordinary ones which somehow fell into a cave, couldn't get out, and were condemned to spend their lives interpreting the world above from the shadows thrown on the back wall. However, with modern methods, they were able to determine genetically that they were separate species. It's not that long ago that similar mistakes would have gone undetected.

*But not very seriously.
 
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#87
A new little octopus.

No matter how deep scientists venture, the ocean always seems to be full of surprises. In late February, researchers from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) took a deep-sea robot for a spin near Hawaii, and they stumbled across a single, small octopus unlike any they’d ever seen before.

For a few years, the NOAA has dispatched the ship Okeanos Explorer to oceans all over the world to explore with its deep-diving robot, the Deep Discoverer. For the first dive of the year, the researchers sent the robot to examine the ocean floor northeast of Hawaii’s Necker Island. As it trawled around about two-and-a-half miles below the surface, the Deep Discoverer came across a tiny, ghost-like octopus hanging out on a large, flat rock all by itself, Sarah Laskow reports for Atlas Obscura.

“This octopus is now confusing several of our shore-based scientists who have never seen anything like this,” one of the researchers can be heard saying on a video taken during the dive.

While the octopus resembles some common species of shallow-water octopi, it has some differences that set it apart, the first being its ghostly color. Most octopi have chromatophore pigments, which allow them to change color. But the mysterious little octopus appears to be missing them, which explains its ghostly, iridescent appearance. Researchers also note that it only had a single row of suckers along each tentacle instead of two, Maddie Stone reports for Gizmodo. ...

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smar...utm_source=twitter.com&utm_medium=socialmedia



Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smar...nknown-octopus-180958290/#t4IA3dKK5oyVEiKq.99
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Nemo

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#89
Millipede so rare 'it doesn't even have a name' discovered

A millipede so rare it is "new to science" and does not even have a common name, has been found in Neath Port Talbot.

Youngsters on a Halloween insect hunt found the bug at Craig Gwladus Country Park, near Cilfrew, on 30 October.

It has since been identified as the Turdulisoma cf turdulorum millipede, so rare it is only the third known site where it has been found.

The first was Aberkenfig, Bridgend, in 2017, by local expert Christian Owen.

It was subsequently confirmed as a new species by Dr Jörg Spelda at the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology in Germany.

All findings have been in south Wales, with the Craig Gwladus discovery uncovered among leaf litter and under old wood along the former Gelliau Colliery Tramroad at the park.
(c) BBC '18.
 
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