People Who Feel Wrong

Ghost In The Machine

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It troubles me that social media ends up being the go-to solution for getting this information to those who need it. Social media is so easily abused by anyone with a grudge. Having a more responsive social care system would protect the vulnerable people depending on care takers and the care takers as well. It would also be less likely that your information could be dismissed as just rumor mongering.

Are there licensing requirements for people who work in such facilities? Is there a way your neighbor could be prevented from qualifying for such jobs, or is this job just a low status, low paying position for those who can't get work elsewhere?
We live opposite a care home where she worked for a couple of days. The other neighbour happens to work there and said they sacked her quickly and quietly for being abusive/offensive... This is a care home that permanently has a huge sign outside, saying they need carers... They are desperate and they employ anyone.

I know from other sources she has a criminal conviction on her DBS (paperwork you have to get in the UK if you work with children or vulnerable adults). But they're so desperate for workers, they overlooked it - as did the second care home, where she now works.

Social Care dept who investigate child cruelty etc also are responsible, I think, in the licensing/running of facilities for the elderly. It's the same dept. She is already on their radar and they have a heap of clear recordings - not allegations, not hearsay. They are sending out social workers regularly to the house, to check on the kids. Local coppers tell us they are well and truly on the radar (as the only people actually committing crimes in this village - copper told me they only have ever been called here for this pair).

I was sat next to the RSPCA inspector when she called the policewoman who goes out with her to lift animals in cruelty cases. She said to the police officer, she had to lift a dog in our village. Without missing a beat, in seconds, the copper said "Oh you'll mean (named my street)" . This is how notorious this woman and her husband are. The police woman had done one of the welfare checks recently when neighbours were beating their kids.

The only in depth response I have had since November from Social Care was when I threatened to go to the media (I write a very good press release - used to do them for a national charity). They pretty well shat themselves by email. So yes - I'm going to draw attention to their failure to act if this stuff doesn't come to court.

We're still waiting to hear.

We have found the police and RSPCA to be brilliant. The housing dept and social workers - bloody useless.
 

escargot

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I know from other sources she has a criminal conviction on her DBS (paperwork you have to get in the UK if you work with children or vulnerable adults). But they're so desperate for workers, they overlooked it - as did the second care home, where she now works.
Care homes HAVE to see the correct paperwork, it's a legal requirement. If the owner is caught employing workers without it who have criminal records there'll be BIG trouble.

The lack of paperwork will be uncovered in the next inspection so it's not like having a faulty cooker or tatty carpet that can be hastily replaced.
 

Ghost In The Machine

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Group settings are easier to keep good than individual ones. When I worked in Care any worker who was seen by the other staff to be "off" or worse with the residents was frozen out, and pressured to leave - but by peers. We didn't bother telling the management because they would do nothing unless, say, marks of violence were visible.

I also reported them to the Care Comission as a whistleblower but never heard back or saw results.
Yes, my other neighbour has worked in the care home opposite for a couple of decades and she is everything you could hope the person looking after an elderly parent, would be. This sounds like what happened there - the weird neighbour only worked there 2 or 3 days and by the last day every one refused to work with her, point blank so she was given her marching orders... I don't know if she was sweary and abusive to her colleagues or the residents. Apparently, only then did they 'discover' the crime on her DBS (you and I both know that's not the case as they'll have seen it before letting her start... the conviction is for criminal damage). I have had to have the old CRBs and then DBS enhanced to do my jobs in the past - so am aware the police have some discretion as what to leave off (I was told) and those reading the DBS have some leeway to overlook a minor crime, or something irrelevant, or something from years back... But the fact the nice neighbour told me they queried her DBS (after a couple of days) makes me fairly sure the conviction was listed. It gave them the leverage to sack her, I guess, but then again - why did they overlook it in the first place? She's not very cogent. I can't imagine her convincing them to give her a chance.

What got me was, the RSPCA inspector was more horrified than the council or the care workers I have spoken to on the phone/ who emailed me... My husband always said the dog would be got out of there long before the children, and so it appears.

I wonder where Social Care stand if the cruelty case goes to court? The children are on the recordings, in the room, and in two incidents at least, the parents are trying to get them to hurt the dog. You can hear a child scream during the final incident when the parents hurt the dog (dog yelps, the scream is overlaid). Social Care have these recordings. Still no action. Yet the dog is already airlifted to safety.
 

Ghost In The Machine

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Care homes HAVE to see the correct paperwork, it's a legal requirement. If the owner is caught employing workers without it who have criminal records there'll be BIG trouble.

The lack of paperwork will be uncovered in the next inspection so it's not like having a faulty cooker or tatty carpet that can be hastily replaced.
I only recently thought to check out the online report for this care home. Apparently it's very close to going into the care home equivalent of special measures... Looks so fancy from the outside, too. I dread to think how many oldies have been conned out of their homes and made to sell up to pay the fees. The report I found made pretty scary reading.

Son's mate - a teenager - works part time at the care home where creepy neighbour currently works. When son told his mate about her dog being seized for cruelty - mate simply replied "That doesn't surprise me!" Makes me wonder what this kid has seen her do to residents, to assume she might harm a puppy.

Social Care know about this woman, have the recordings, are being kept upto speed by other agencies involved, so other agencies tell me - and yet they have done sod all.

I don't want to prejudice anypossible upcoming case so am being careful what I say, here. I know social services as they then were, when I was a teacher, were fecking useless. To the point of deliberately returning abused kids we taught to their abusers. So nothing surprises me.
 

PeteS

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Part of the problem I'm sure is the sometimes ridiculously long time it takes to get DBS paperwork from the CRB - employers are known to employ staff pending receipt of the paperwork. Stupidly dangerous imo. If the care home does go into Special Measures they've had it - likely to be shut down pronto.
 
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Ghost in the Machine, I hear you about the social workers. We had issues with our neighbours - thankfully not as bad as what you seemed to have gone through, but still unpleasant. She had two kids living with her, and the third lived away from her but visited and then at some point moved back in. This was after we had reported her and the boyfriend numerous times to the police and to the social workers. They were drug addicts and frequently had loud, often violet arguments (she would beat him up more often than not). He had a temper too - smashed the glass in the communal door on numerous occasions. He wasn't even meant to be living with her, but he frequently broke the locks on the communal door to get in and she always let him into the flat. They would come round every Thursday to borrow money for drugs - even when we ignored them they would hammer on our door for hours. They had already tried conning the old woman on the ground floor for money, until she sent her grandson round, and he threatened to kill them. On a Friday when they had failed to pay their debt, often the "debt collectors" would hover outside their flat = on two separate occasions throwing stones at the windows. When we asked them to stop as they were in danger of hitting our windows, they simply asked us for the money instead. This all happened with the children present in the flat.

One Thursday night was particularly bad - some "friends" came over and they had a massive argument in the hallway which got violent. I wasn't home, my OH was. He called 999 but by the time the police came, it had all stopped and they wouldn't answer the door to the police. When I got home, he came down to escort me upstairs in case anyone was around. The next day we were woken up by the kids screaming and crying and banging on something loudly. As we were leaving for work, we went back past their door - the front door was wide open, anyone could have walked in. The two kids were inside, but I think they must have been locked in the bedroom as we couldn't see or hear them running around. The two adults were passed out. I phoned social services who made all the right noises, but essentially did nothing. In fact it was after this incident that the third child came back to live with them. There were other incidents apart from this - the time the mum ran out of the house leaving the two kids alone whilst she did a drug deal in the car park. The time our neighbour watched the mum argue with her boyfriend in front of the middle child, who then started hitting his head against the lampost screaming don't make daddy go. In the end I stopped ringing the social services and spoke to the NSPCC - who said that we need to speak to social services.

The final incident was January last year, one of the coldest nights of the year so far and the mum had a massive argument with the boyfriend outside in the car park and her eldest child, who was completely naked, next to her - this went on for nearly an hour.

So many people have these horror stories where social services are doing nothing, and it makes me so concerned for the children of these families and what the long term affects of living with such abuse can lead to.
 

escargot

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Part of the problem I'm sure is the sometimes ridiculously long time it takes to get DBS paperwork from the CRB - employers are known to employ staff pending receipt of the paperwork. Stupidly dangerous imo. If the care home does go into Special Measures they've had it - likely to be shut down pronto.
The way they get round this is not to let the workers operate alone with clients. So they'll be sent to do jobs where a hoist or other two-person process is used. In my experience this lasts about half a morning before the worker sent off to do things on their own.
 

escargot

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Saw my rep today. It's all out of my hands now. Even if I tried to go back on things I couldn't; not that I want to.

I've offered to give any further statements or go to necessary meetings but Rep says there's no need. My union will make sure the case is rock-solid and will then sort it out. Whatever happens I'm safe now and hopefully so is everyone else.

Wish I could be more specific! but there we are.
 

escargot

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Chatted with a colleague earlier and she reminded me of a little incident.

Another female colleague also complained verbally about Mr A and promised me she'd also make a written statement.
However, she never did and even though she is terrified of him she wouldn't do it.

I'm guessing she'd seen how hard I'd pushed and got nowhere except managing to get a name as a troublemaker, and decided not to call attention to herself.

So one night last year Techy met me out as usual and He was there, and the colleague who'd let me down arrived as we were leaving.
We warned her He was present and she asked us to go back in with her. Naaaah I said, We're going home. Off we went.
 

Cochise

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Wrt advertising, there's an old Bill Hicks short routine about it. It ends with him saying (something like) :

....I'll tell you what they would do if they could...camera's focusing in on a woman's face, she's beautiful, camera pulls back, she's topless, camera pulls back more, she's totally naked, with two fingers...right there...touching herself...and then it just says "Drink Coke". That's what they would do, if they could get away with it....

Just about spot on imo.
At that point the last thing I'd be thinking about is 'Drink coke'. Champagne or maybe Mars bars depending on the lady in question.

But then I've never seen Coke - the legal sort - as a sex aid, or likely to attract women except those who actually like rotten teeth.
 

Cochise

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Saw my rep today. It's all out of my hands now. Even if I tried to go back on things I couldn't; not that I want to.

I've offered to give any further statements or go to necessary meetings but Rep says there's no need. My union will make sure the case is rock-solid and will then sort it out. Whatever happens I'm safe now and hopefully so is everyone else.

Wish I could be more specific! but there we are.
It amazes me you've had so much difficulty sorting this out. If I'd been your boss (I was a manager once) I'd have gone totally Librarian-poo on your behalf. It wouldn't have needed the Union.

Mind you, this is probably why no-one wants me as a manger any more, despite having run large teams and having been responsible for budgets in the few millions.

And of course the fact that i tend to be more protective of women than men (the latter can go sort it out in the car park) is hardly a popular stance these days.
 

escargot

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It amazes me you've had so much difficulty sorting this out. If I'd been your boss (I was a manager once) I'd have gone totally Librarian-poo on your behalf. It wouldn't have needed the Union.

Mind you, this is probably why no-one wants me as a manger any more, despite having run large teams and having been responsible for budgets in the few millions.

And of course the fact that i tend to be more protective of women than men (the latter can go sort it out in the car park) is hardly a popular stance these days.
The reason it's taken so long is that I've followed procedure and gone through my manager, who has been repeatedly fobbed off by Mr Angry's company.
Only last week I found out they'd dumped him on our depot because he was trouble, so that'll be why they weren't co-operating!

A couple of months ago I finally realised I wasn't getting anywhere and wrote to my manager demanding to be given early shifts to avoid Mr A.
This was denied by my area manager but fulfilled informally by my excellent immediate manager.

So I've only made progress by getting stroppy. A valuable life lesson!
 

Ghost In The Machine

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The reason it's taken so long is that I've followed procedure and gone through my manager, who has been repeatedly fobbed off by Mr Angry's company.
Only last week I found out they'd dumped him on our depot because he was trouble, so that'll be why they weren't co-operating!

A couple of months ago I finally realised I wasn't getting anywhere and wrote to my manager demanding to be given early shifts to avoid Mr A.
This was denied by my area manager but fulfilled informally by my excellent immediate manager.

So I've only made progress by getting stroppy. A valuable life lesson!
I once had a part time office job to pay my way through uni abroad, in the Admissions office. Learned really quickly the people who are pains when you're in admin, are the ones who get dealt with quickly just to get them out of the office's hair. I always thought being a bit of a dick meant you got put the the bottom of the pile or dropped down the back of a filng cabinet but no, those people who complained - got what they wanted far faster than the silent majority.
 

Tin

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I once had a part time office job to pay my way through uni abroad, in the Admissions office. Learned really quickly the people who are pains when you're in admin, are the ones who get dealt with quickly just to get them out of the office's hair. I always thought being a bit of a dick meant you got put the the bottom of the pile or dropped down the back of a filng cabinet but no, those people who complained - got what they wanted far faster than the silent majority.
Yep, the squeakiest wheel gets oiled soonest.
 

escargot

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I once had a part time office job to pay my way through uni abroad, in the Admissions office. Learned really quickly the people who are pains when you're in admin, are the ones who get dealt with quickly just to get them out of the office's hair. I always thought being a bit of a dick meant you got put the the bottom of the pile or dropped down the back of a filng cabinet but no, those people who complained - got what they wanted far faster than the silent majority.
So true! I should have learned that lesson years ago, when I worked in hospitals and care homes. The patients and residents whose families came in often and were generally on the ball were frankly better looked after.

In fact when my own father was dying in hospital I took a month off work so I could cycle up to see him every day, sometimes twice or mote, and make sure he was receiving good care. I once went in to find Dad in a freezing cold sideroom, covered with just a sheet, with the window open and the call bell clipped up out of his reach.

After dragging every member of staff on duty in to show them how cold and uncomfortable he was I went off to the linen room myself for blankets and tucked him in properly. He was OK after that!

So yeah, how foolish of me to think I could rely on my managers to sort out Mr Angry.
 

Tin

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So true! I should have learned that lesson years ago, when I worked in hospitals and care homes. The patients and residents whose families came in often and were generally on the ball were frankly better looked after.

In fact when my own father was dying in hospital I took a month off work so I could cycle up to see him every day, sometimes twice or mote, and make sure he was receiving good care. I once went in to find Dad in a freezing cold sideroom, covered with just a sheet, with the window open and the call bell clipped up out of his reach.

After dragging every member of staff on duty in to show them how cold and uncomfortable he was I went off to the linen room myself for blankets and tucked him in properly. He was OK after that!

So yeah, how foolish of me to think I could rely on my managers to sort out Mr Angry.
Not foolish of you at all, you would expect them to do their job and look out for their staff.
 

Ghost In The Machine

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So true! I should have learned that lesson years ago, when I worked in hospitals and care homes. The patients and residents whose families came in often and were generally on the ball were frankly better looked after.

In fact when my own father was dying in hospital I took a month off work so I could cycle up to see him every day, sometimes twice or mote, and make sure he was receiving good care. I once went in to find Dad in a freezing cold sideroom, covered with just a sheet, with the window open and the call bell clipped up out of his reach.

After dragging every member of staff on duty in to show them how cold and uncomfortable he was I went off to the linen room myself for blankets and tucked him in properly. He was OK after that!

So yeah, how foolish of me to think I could rely on my managers to sort out Mr Angry.
No, not foolish. It's what they are paid to be doing.

Ah yes I hear you re. Dad. Mine was rushed into hospital when he was close to the end, with his cancer - and he was paralysed. They'd plonk his dinner down next to him and walk out and leave him to it. There was a gent with dementia who loved tipping the other elderly patients out of bed at night. I can only imagine how terrifying that was for dad. When we complained, they said he could hit the panic alarm button if someone came into his room at night. Er, Einstein, he's paralysed... His GP got him the hell out of there so he could die in peace, at home. He could barely speak but he begged me to stand between my stepmother or anyone else trying to send him back to hospital. I promised him I wouldn't let anyone take him back there then lived in terror his last few weeks, that someone would when I was home as we were 125 miles away and couldn't always be there by his side.

There was no shortage of nurses on that ward but they were too busy sitting at their station, chatting about crap - they'd ignore you whilst they talked about 'Eastenders'. This was ten years back when they weren't as short staffed.

Us intervening had zero effect. They truly didn't give a toss. I'd imagine their managers were as competent as they were.
 

escargot

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No, not foolish. It's what they are paid to be doing.

Ah yes I hear you re. Dad. Mine was rushed into hospital when he was close to the end, with his cancer - and he was paralysed. They'd plonk his dinner down next to him and walk out and leave him to it. There was a gent with dementia who loved tipping the other elderly patients out of bed at night. I can only imagine how terrifying that was for dad. When we complained, they said he could hit the panic alarm button if someone came into his room at night. Er, Einstein, he's paralysed... His GP got him the hell out of there so he could die in peace, at home. He could barely speak but he begged me to stand between my stepmother or anyone else trying to send him back to hospital. I promised him I wouldn't let anyone take him back there then lived in terror his last few weeks, that someone would when I was home as we were 125 miles away and couldn't always be there by his side.

There was no shortage of nurses on that ward but they were too busy sitting at their station, chatting about crap - they'd ignore you whilst they talked about 'Eastenders'. This was ten years back when they weren't as short staffed.

Us intervening had zero effect. They truly didn't give a toss. I'd imagine their managers were as competent as they were.
That's awful. As I mentioned, I used to work in the same hospital and even the very ward where my Dad was so I knew all the dodges.
I wasn't being fobbed off.

When dementia patients were left alone with meals instead of being fed I'd tip off the relations and advise them to come in at least once a day to feed Gran themselves or they'd starve.
 

brownmane

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That's awful. As I mentioned, I used to work in the same hospital and even the very ward where my Dad was so I knew all the dodges.
I wasn't being fobbed off.

When dementia patients were left alone with meals instead of being fed I'd tip off the relations and advise them to come in at least once a day to feed Gran themselves or they'd starve.
And that's the sad part. That no one in the home would think there was anything wrong with leaving someone to do what they cannot do on their own, and that the relations would have to be told that that is what is happening.

I feel particularly bad for people who have no family to help or speak out for them.

I worked at a long term care home. A woman who was bedridden due to a broken hip was unable to come into the dining room for meals so the PSW's would assist her in her bedroom with meals. This woman was in a private room and so was alone most of the day. When I assisted her with her meal, I would try to spend some time (1/2 hour) chatting with her while she was eating.

I got s*** from the other staff saying that I was taking too long helping her as they needed help in the dining room with others who needed assistance. I felt bad for her and couldn't believe that other staff wouldn't understand. I would not complain that another staff was taking too long if I knew they were with that woman. Many others who needed help with their meals took 20-30 minutes to finish, but because they were in the dining room, it was not an issue.
 

escargot

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I worked at a long term care home. A woman who was bedridden due to a broken hip was unable to come into the dining room for meals so the PSW's would assist her in her bedroom with meals. This woman was in a private room and so was alone most of the day. When I assisted her with her meal, I would try to spend some time (1/2 hour) chatting with her while she was eating.
I too have a story about spending time with a patient.
 

Who me

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Morning all been reading some of the stuff on the thread.My god there are some truly horrible scrotes out there.
Had my fair share of people like that.My wifes ex-husband was a really evil piece of work. Liked to give her and the son a good slap just to keep them in line.And the mind games .Anyway first meeting with him went like this.
Him what you doing in my house with the s..g
Me punch punch smack what did you call my girlfriend
Him sorry sorry mate I’m sorry I’ll just take my son and go
Me thumping him no you won’t now f..k off
Him sorry mate yeah sorry
End of problem
 
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