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The Pyramids Of Giza

It seems coincidental that the present day line of vegetation in an otherwise pretty barren landscape, ends right where the old branch would have run.

Could there still be some water flowing underground along the old route?

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When I was in Egypt last year, our local guide said that the yearly flooding of the Nile used to bring the river up to the pyramids at Giza. Maybe when the flood resided it left a waterway for a while until it dired up each year. There does seem to be a corolation between the vegetation and the edges of the flood.

He said that the workforce were not slaves but seasonal workers who could not farm when the plains flooded. So they worked on the pyramids to get paid partly in food. It was better than starving. At certain sites we saw the visible water marks and residues of the water and mud high up on the sides of temples.

Re: Christopher Dunn. His Power plant theory sounds both amazing and crazy in equal measure.

His theory (Please correct me if I'm wrong): Starting at the bottom: The whole pyramid vibrated at a certain frequency which matched the Earths natural frequency thanks to some sort of Tesla-esque subterranean machine.

A mixture of chemicals were poured via two shafts into the Queens chamber. These released hydrogen due to the vibration. The hydrogen then makes it's way into the Kings chamber via an assending passage and the Grand gallery.

Cosmic microwaves were funnelled down one shaft into the Kings chamber (This shaft is built at just the right dimensions to increase the amplitude of a certain wavelength which activates the hydrogen). High energy microwaves are then output from the Kings chamber via another shaft.

My questions would be (amongst others): What happens to the waste products in the Queens chamber? Why is the structure so massive? What was powering the Tesla machine? How did they harness the Output?
 
When I was in Egypt last year, our local guide said that the yearly flooding of the Nile used to bring the river up to the pyramids at Giza. Maybe when the flood resided it left a waterway for a while until it dired up each year. There does seem to be a corolation between the vegetation and the edges of the flood.

He said that the workforce were not slaves but seasonal workers who could not farm when the plains flooded. So they worked on the pyramids to get paid partly in food. It was better than starving. At certain sites we saw the visible water marks and residues of the water and mud high up on the sides of temples.

Re: Christopher Dunn. His Power plant theory sounds both amazing and crazy in equal measure.

His theory (Please correct me if I'm wrong): Starting at the bottom: The whole pyramid vibrated at a certain frequency which matched the Earths natural frequency thanks to some sort of Tesla-esque subterranean machine.

A mixture of chemicals were poured via two shafts into the Queens chamber. These released hydrogen due to the vibration. The hydrogen then makes it's way into the Kings chamber via an assending passage and the Grand gallery.

Cosmic microwaves were funnelled down one shaft into the Kings chamber (This shaft is built at just the right dimensions to increase the amplitude of a certain wavelength which activates the hydrogen). High energy microwaves are then output from the Kings chamber via another shaft.

My questions would be (amongst others): What happens to the waste products in the Queens chamber? Why is the structure so massive? What was powering the Tesla machine? How did they harness the Output?
The workers weren't just paid in food, they were paid in beef and medical care. For that time that's great pay. Keep in mind at the time you were mostly limited to what you could hunt or grow.
The Egyptian state stockpiled grain and meat and used it to support the population through lean times and to fund their massive construction projects.
This richness in grain was part of what made Egypt so valued by later civilizations like the Romans.

As for Dunn, he claims a bunch of things. Like that the Egyptians or whoever actually built the pyramids, had high tech power tools they used to rapidly cut the stone.
There's a bunch of issues with these ideas, but part of the issue I have with his claims is that he only looks at Ancient Egyptian sites.
The Romans cut loads of granite, and took over the quarries in Egypt when it was their turn. Shipping raw blocks back to Rome to be worked there by the artisans. If his claims about the stone work were valid, a good way to prove this would be by comparing the much better attested stone work by the Romans, who had superior tools and techniques to the Ancient Egyptians, though the basic technology used was the same.
 
It seems coincidental that the present day line of vegetation in an otherwise pretty barren landscape, ends right where the old branch would have run.

Could there still be some water flowing underground along the old route?

View attachment 77063
If there were water flowing underground along the old route making for the modern border of vegetation, wouldn't we expect some vegetation on both sides of the old route?
 
Something I came across today. Only three relics were ever discovered within the Great Pyramid:

Treasures of the Museum: The Mysterious Dixon Relics​

Back in the fall of 2020, it was excitedly reported a 5,000 year old artifact, one of only three relics ever discovered in the Great Pyramid, was ‘re-located’. The 2020 rediscovery of small fragments of cedar wood, found inside a cigar box, that was misplaced back in 1946, brought new attention to the Dixon Relics. The Dixon Relics are a trio of mysterious objects found in the Great Pyramid back in 1872.

Right from their initial discovery, this valuable trio was separated. The objects were found by Waynman Dixon, and his friend James Grant, while investigating the Great Pyramid in 1872. Dixon had kept two of the objects, which are now housed and displayed at the British Museum, but the pieces of wood were kept by Grant. These cedar fragments were later given to the University of Aberdeen by Grant’s family in 1946. However, at that time they were not catalogued correctly and went missing for over 70 years. Fortunately, they have now been found in the University’s museum collections, and can be reunited.

The Dixon Relics were found inside the air shafts leading from the Queen’s Chamber inside the Great Pyramid. The three objects are described as a small stone ball, a copper hook, and cedar wood fragments.
https://mysteriouswritings.com/treasures-of-the-museum-the-mysterious-dixon-relics/
 
If there were water flowing underground along the old route making for the modern border of vegetation, wouldn't we expect some vegetation on both sides of the old route?
It depends on the exact route I suppose.
There could be some on either side- or maybe it's not been allowed to grow there, for some reason.
 
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