Thylacines (Post-1936 Sightings)

oldrover

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Genetically incompatible to that degree?
Definitely. The Thylacinadae are a stand alone group, used to be thought to be closely related to the Dasyurids, devils, quolls etc, but turns out to be a sister group to them. Closest living relative is actually the numbat.

All these photos from the mainland are foxes or dogs, they look nothing remotely like tigers, which became extinct there for about 3kya. You don't tend to see them from Tasmania (extinct there in the early 1930s) as there are no foxes there.
 

Mungoman

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Interesting. I mean it does look plausible as a Tasmanian Tiger as positioned in the image. Though with its head facing us like that it's impossible to say whether it has the facial profile we'd be looking for.

One thought though. Is it implausible at this point that Thylacines may have cross-bred with another marsupial - either at some point in the distant past (before being declared extinct) or through a small number of survivors in generations after that point.

What I mean is, when we see modern sightings like this, is what we are seeing truly a 'Tasmanian Tiger' or another cross-bred creature, which has inherited markings or body shape from having a thylacine as an ancestor?
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Mungoman

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Genetically incompatible to that degree?
We have a gentleman here who's surname is Waters who believes that mainland Thylacines are extant. and have altered genetically in 4,000 years in response to their environment.

I doubt it. To paraphrase Monty Python - The mainland Thylacine is not pining for the Fjords...it is bereft of life, it rests in peace, It's metabolic processes are now history! It's kicked the bucket, It's shuffled off its mortal coil...it is deceased.
 

oldrover

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We have a gentleman here who's surname is Waters who believes that mainland Thylacines are extant. and have altered genetically in 4,000 years in response to their environment.

I doubt it. To paraphrase Monty Python - The mainland Thylacine is not pining for the Fjords...it is bereft of life, it rests in peace, It's metabolic processes are now history! It's kicked the bucket, It's shuffled off its mortal coil...it is deceased.
I could tell some stories about that one, but I won't.
 

CuriousIdent

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We have a gentleman here who's surname is Waters who believes that mainland Thylacines are extant. and have altered genetically in 4,000 years in response to their environment.

I doubt it. To paraphrase Monty Python - The mainland Thylacine is not pining for the Fjords...it is bereft of life, it rests in peace, It's metabolic processes are now history! It's kicked the bucket, It's shuffled off its mortal coil...it is deceased.

I don't disagree that here and now, 2019, they are almost certainly long since gone. My question was purely if there were other creatures out there which had perhaps bred with Thylacines in past generations, resulting in a small number of crossbreeds. Bearing some of the markings or shape of the extinct Tasmanian Tiger in a current generation.

If that is truly implausible then probably not.
 

oldrover

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Southern Tasmania is currently suffering bush fires, one of the strutures destroyed is what's become known as Churchill's Hut. It isn't Churchill's hut, that was a different structure elsewhere, but it has become associated with the capture of the last thylacine in 1933. Of course, this too is just a story which seems to date to the late 50s to mid 60s, and there's absolutely no evidence Elias Churchill captured the last tiger, and contracictory primary evidence to whoever it was capturing him in 1933.
 
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