History Rewritten

rynner2

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Rolling Stones plaque 'disgusts' Bill Wyman
25 June 2015

A plaque marking the meeting between Mick Jagger and Keith Richards is to be replaced after The Rolling Stones' former bassist Bill Wyman objected.
The blue plaque, unveiled at Dartford station in February, says the pair "went on to form The Rolling Stones".
But Wyman complained, saying guitarist Brian Jones created The Rolling Stones and enlisted the other members.
"I've never upset a Rolling Stone before but we are going to put it right," said councillor Jeremy Kite.

Jagger and Richards both went to Wentworth Primary School but met up again on platform two of Dartford station in Kent on 17 October 1961.
They bonded over a love of the blues and formed a musical friendship that still endures.

Wyman, who left the band in 1993, told BBC Radio 5 live the plaque was disgusting.
"Mick Jagger and Keith Richards didn't create the Rolling Stones - they were part of The Rolling Stones like all of us," he said.
"Brian Jones wanted to form a blues band and he enlisted each member one by one.
"He gave the name The Rolling Stones, he chose the music and he was the leader
."
Guitarist Jones drowned in the swimming pool of his home at Cotchford Farm in Hartfield, East Sussex in 1969 after taking a cocktail of drink and drugs.

Dartford council leader Mr Kite said the plaque was intended to commemorate the meeting of the two Dartford sons, not the formation of The Rolling Stones.
But he said it would be taken down and replaced by another with new wording.
"Accuracy in history is really, really important and we want it to be right," he said.
"We will create a new plaque which makes it clear that this is where Mick met Keith and went on to be part of The Rolling Stones."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-kent-33277997
 

Naughty_Felid

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Nazi sympathiser and former King, the Duke of Windsor, 'wanted England bombed', archives reveal
King Edward VIII, who later became the Duke of Windsor and is widely regarded as a Nazi sympathiser, once argued that bombing England could bring peace by ending WWII, it has emerged.

Correspondence kept in the Royal Archives between the British royal family and their German relatives in the run up to WWII remains confidential.

However, information pieced together from open archives across 30 countries, including Germany, Spain and Russia, has revealed the close relationship some members of the European aristocracy had with the Nazis.

Dr Karina Urbach, senior research fellow at the Institute of Historical Research at the School of Advance Study at the University of London, has uncovered how the Duke of Windsor told Don Javier Bermejillo, his old friend and Spanish diplomat, that the British royal blamed “the Jews, the Reds and the Foreign Office for the war”.

Writing for The Conversation, Dr Urbach explained how Windsor told Bermejillo on 25 June 1940 that “if one bombed England effectively this could bring peace.

“Bermejillo concluded that the Duke of Windsor seemed very much to hope that this would occur: 'He wants peace at any price.',” wrote Dr Urbach.

She added: “This report went to Franco and was then passed on to the Germans. The bombing of Britain started on 10 July.” ...

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/n...-england-bombed-archives-reveal-31287014.html
This was the same guy who was awarded a Military Cross for visiting the front lines a few times in world war 1 and visited Hitler in 36 despite the British government advising against it.
 
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As the centenary of the 1916 Easter Rising approaches, the history wars in Ireland still rage
Will poking around in the embers of Irish history rekindle old flames?


The creeping barrage of First World War centenaries moves inexorably on. Gallipoli 2015 is now behind us. In 2016 the French will turn their sights on Verdun while the British target the Somme. In both cases the commemorations will tell us as much about the present as the past, exposing divergent national attitudes on either side of the Channel towards European reconciliation and integration. But the most present-centred anniversaries in 2016 will take place in Ireland. Here, history remains particularly raw.

The Easter Rising of 1916 has become the foundational myth of the modern Irish state. The revolt itself was a quixotic act, involving no more than 1,500 people, and the whole thing was crushed within a week at the cost of 450 lives, more than half of them civilians. But the crass brutality of the British military afterwards, including several thousand arrests and 16 executions, helped turn the “rainbow chasers” into national martyrs. The ruined General Post Office on Sackville Street in Dublin, the rebels’ short-lived headquarters, became the iconic symbol of the rising. ...

Clinging tight to Easter 1916 – told as a heroic saga of national resurrection, of good v evil – has therefore been a convenient, even necessary, narrative in Ireland. But this will be much harder to sustain a century on, as is clear from two recent books by Maurice Walsh and Diarmaid Ferriter, and from others in the pre-centenary literary build-up. For one thing, rich new sources have become available in the past decade or so. In 2003 the Irish government finally opened the records of the Bureau of Military History (BMH), including over 1,700 statements taken in the 1940s and 1950s from veterans of the rising and the war of independence. And in 2014 it started to make available online the Military Service Pensions Collection (MSPC), nearly 300,000 files from veterans of 1916-23 who set down detailed accounts of their service to the state in order to secure pensions or compensation. ...
http://www.newstatesman.com/politic...easter-rising-history-wars-ireland-still-rage
 

rynner2

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I caught a bit of Yes Minister this afternoon. For a show that went out in the early 80s it still seems fairly modern in many ways. In this episode Sir Humphrey and Bernard have a bet on something the minister would say when next they meet. What would people in their position bet? £10, £20, £50...? No, the bet was for £1!

And when it was settled, a pound note was handed over! (The pound coin was introduced in 1983.)


I also learned, from Wiki,

There is apparent convergence of opinion regarding the origin of the term "pound sterling", toward its derivation from the name of a small Norman silver coin,[11] and away from its association with Easterlings (Germanic traders) or other etymologies.[12][13] Hence, the Oxford English Dictionary (and sources derived therefrom)[14][15] state that the "most plausible" etymology is derivation from the Old English steorra for "star" with the added diminutive suffix "-ling", to mean "little star" and to refer to a silver penny of the English Normans.[11] As another established source notes,[16] the compound expression was then derived:
silver coins known as "sterlings" were issued in the Saxon kingdoms, 240 of them being minted from a pound of silver... Hence, large payments came to be reckoned in "pounds of sterlings," a phrase later shortened...
Encyclopædia Britannica, entry "pound sterling"


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UK_currency#Names
 
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Brain surgery saved Russian general who helped defeat Napoleon: Scientists 'rewrite' history books
Date:
July 29, 2015
Source:
St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center
Summary:
After more than two-years of international investigation, scientists have concluded that Napoleon likely would have conquered Russia in 1812 if not for the life-saving brain surgery performed on Russian general Mikhail Kutuzov by the French surgeon Jean Massot, who operated on Kutuzov after bullets twice passed through his head.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/07/150729102101.htm
 

GerdaWordyer

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I caught a bit of Yes Minister this afternoon. For a show that went out in the early 80s it still seems fairly modern in many ways. In this episode Sir Humphrey and Bernard have a bet on something the minister would say when next they meet. What would people in their position bet? £10, £20, £50...? No, the bet was for £1!

And when it was settled, a pound note was handed over! (The pound coin was introduced in 1983.)


I also learned, from Wiki,

There is apparent convergence of opinion regarding the origin of the term "pound sterling", toward its derivation from the name of a small Norman silver coin,[11] and away from its association with Easterlings (Germanic traders) or other etymologies.[12][13] Hence, the Oxford English Dictionary (and sources derived therefrom)[14][15] state that the "most plausible" etymology is derivation from the Old English steorra for "star" with the added diminutive suffix "-ling", to mean "little star" and to refer to a silver penny of the English Normans.[11] As another established source notes,[16] the compound expression was then derived:
silver coins known as "sterlings" were issued in the Saxon kingdoms, 240 of them being minted from a pound of silver... Hence, large payments came to be reckoned in "pounds of sterlings," a phrase later shortened...
Encyclopædia Britannica, entry "pound sterling"


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UK_currency#Names
For real 80's and 90's period oddness, and convergence with modernity, watch Yes Minister at the same time your public station is running both Yes. . . and House of Cards. But I'm afraid I can't possibly comment . . .
 

rynner2

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Ex-President Warren Harding's love child confirmed
By Ashley Gold BBC News, Washington
13 August 2015

It turns out the rumours were always true - America's 29th president had a love child.
New genetic tests reveal Warren Harding fathered a child with Nan Britton during his presidency.
The tests show that Harding, who was married, was indeed the father of Elizabeth Ann Blaesing, the late Britton's daughter.

Harding's immediate family and the public had rejected the claims and shamed Britton, calling her a liar.
Dr Peter Harding, one of the former president's grand-nephews who spearheaded getting the DNA tests done, told the BBC he is "totally jubilant" to finally know the truth about Blaesing's father.

"This has been a family mystery since I became aware of it," Mr Harding said. "There was no way to really resolve it. Back in the 1920s, there was only whether someone looked like someone else."
He thinks advanced DNA testing was definitely conclusive. Mr Harding and his cousin Abigail Harding pursued the tests with James Blaesing, a grandson of Britton.

etc...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-33915102
 

rynner2

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First Great Western unveils rebranded Great Western Railway trains
21 September 2015

Rebranded Great Western Railway (GWR) trains have been unveiled by the firm formerly known as First Great Western.
By re-adopting the historical name, the company hopes to "rediscover the pioneering spirit" of the service that first ran on the line.
Three of its trains have been decked out in green and start running later.
Managing director Mark Hopwood said the rebrand was a "historic milestone", to recall what Isambard Kingdom Brunel first achieved in 1833.

The new-look company said it had no plans to increase its fares, but the changes have resulted in staff union disputes.
"It is the perfect opportunity to launch the Great Western Railway once again," said Mr Hopwood.
"It's a new dawn for our railway and we're excited to be at the helm."

Tim O'Toole, chief executive of FirstGroup, the operator of GWR, called it a "railway steeped in years of tradition".
"The franchise will see new or refurbished trains on every part of the network, resulting in more frequent and faster journeys and an increase in the number of seats, keeping people moving and communities prospering."

It is estimated it will take until 2018 to repaint all of the company's trains.
The rebrand is part of a £7.5bn programme, which involves the electrification of tracks, the modernisation of stations and the introduction of the trains.

Plans to make changes to staffing and on-board catering facilities on the trains have led to disputes with the Rail, Maritime and Transport union, which fears guards and buffet cars will be disposed of.
However, GWR has insisted it will increase the number of on-board staff across the company by 100.

The service operates around south west England, south Wales, London, and the Thames Valley.
The original Great Western Railway linked London to Bristol for the first time.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-34292550

A cunning move? God's Wonderful Railway is still remembered with great affection in the SW. First have a tough act to follow.
 

amyasleigh

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A cunning move? God's Wonderful Railway is still remembered with great affection in the SW. First have a tough act to follow.
In times past, there was counter-acronym-play on the part of proponents of the rival route between London and the West Country: the London & South Western Railway. For a very long while, the LSWR ran a relatively "beeline" route between London and Exeter, via Basingstoke and Salisbury. The Great Western took a very considerably longer route, London -- Swindon -- Bristol -- Taunton -- Exeter: causing it to be acronymically lampooned by those in the rival camp, as the "Great Way Round". At last in 1906, by dint of some final joining-up and cut-off-creating, the Great Western established its new direct main line between Reading and Taunton; which made more or less equal, the rival rail companies' distances re their routes to the south-west.
 
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I have suffered at the hands of First Great Western. For two and half long years.

B'stads!

They're a shit service with tiny trains delayed everyday and feeble excuses. Their drivers joined a Facepuke page and trolled it out of existence.

Rebrand all you want FGW...your service is utter shite.
 

Swifty

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This is more of a history still being written post ..

HEROINE MOTHER PROTECTS HER DAUGHTER 73 YEARS AFTER HER DEATH ..

I've posted about the WW2 French/English resistance fighter Violette Szabo before in this post, my parents became good friends with her daughter last year. Violette never got to know her daughter, in fact, she sadly died in the Auschwitz concentration camp a few days before it was liberated.

Her daughter was presented with her Mother's medals when she was five years old by King George ... she says that all she remembers was a very tall man giving them to her. Unfortunately, her cottage in Wales burned down not long ago and she wasn't insured although she did manage to rescue Violette's medals including her Mum's George Cross and some replicas ..

She's staying at my Mum and Dads this week because a road is being named in her Mum's honour in Limoges, she'll be wearing the replicas though because she's just sold the originals to Lord 'David Cameron piggygate' Ashcroft for £400,000 for his museum :) ... I'm not making this up, honestly !

She'll be using the money to get herself re housed, possibly back to the same area that her Mum kicked Nazi arse so hard all those years ago and hopefully near to my parents because I know they'll make a fuss of her (although she's pretty sprightly apparently!).

I think it's great that her hero Mum's medals are keeping her safe now :cool:

VZ ... as beautiful as she was dangerous

VZ.png
 
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Several space pioneers shared their experiences this month regarding the Cold War Air Force program: The Manned Orbiting Laboratory.

In the 1960s, the U.S. Air Force initiated a human spaceflight program to carry out experiments in space in a laboratory orbiting the Earth for an extended period of time. The Manned Orbiting Laboratory, or MOL, was to use USAF-modified NASA Gemini spacecraft to put two crewmen in a space station.

MOL provided a platform for a highly secret program to gain Cold War intelligence on the Soviet Union and other adversaries.

Four former MOL crew members — 17 astronauts were chosen for the program — were scheduled to take part in a presentation "The Dorian Files Revealed: The Manned Orbiting Laboratory Crew Members' Secret Mission in Space." A National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) Keyhole -10 camera was codenamed "Dorian."

The free event occurred on Thursday (Oct. 22) at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio.

http://www.space.com/30897-air-force-manned-orbiting-lab-astronauts.html?cmpid=514648
 
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They actually did the MOL programme?
Whatever happened to it? Do we know whether it burned up in re-entry?
Doesn't seem to have been unclassified yet.

Its also known that there were Military Shuttle missions. Don't know who the astronauts were* or what exactly the missions were about.

*Its likely though that experienced Shuttle pilots participated in these missions.
 

Tribble

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A veteran CIA agent claims to have proof Hitler faked his own death in his bunker at the end of the Second World War.

The team have used a collection of never-before-seen documents to develop the theory that Hitler did not actually kill himself and instead fled to the Canary Islands.

Veteran CIA agent Bob Baer said: "The narrative the government gives us is a lie. if you look at the FBI files it throws open the investigation.

"What we are doing is re-examining history, history that we thought was settled that Hitler died in the bunker but the deeper we get into it, it's clear to me we don't have any facts for it."

Mr Baer's team have access to 700 pages of newly declassified information.

The team claim Hitler 'easily' faked his own death through the use of a double, as the corpse found by Russians was said to be five inches shorter than Hitler and with a smaller skull.

In a series on The History Channel, Ex-United Nations war crimes investigator John Cencich interviews an alleged witness to Hitler's escape.

The Greek former construction worker tells Mr Cencich: "In 1945 I was building a secret construction inside the monastery in Samos."

"I had to build secret tunnels and compartments for Germans," he continued. "Yes, the Germans were Nazis and one of these guys was Adolf Hitler.

"He was right there, he wasn't wearing a moustache or anything. this was May 1945. I realised it was really Hitler because of the airplane.

"I went to work in another town. The first thing I saw in this town was a German airplane. It had landed in an old potato field. the farmer told me there were five people who landed, they were German."

Mr Cencich said: "The accepted truth that he committed suicide is ambiguous."

When the war came to an end many Nazis made an exodus to South America to begin a new life away from Europe.

It is claimed Hitler traveled by U-Boat to Argentina from the Canary Islands to be reunited with his comrades.


http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/weird-news/adolf-hitler-faked-death-fled-7138333
 
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...The team claim Hitler 'easily' faked his own death through the use of a double, as the corpse found by Russians was said to be five inches shorter than Hitler and with a smaller skull...
Hold on...five inches shorter. Is that not a bit like someone trying to cover up Margaret Thatcher's demise by using Wee Jimmie Krankie's corpse?

Why is it so many supposedly fiendishly clever world-cheating conspiracies seem to be perpetrated by people capable of such massive fails?

Oh, and if yer man was building secret German constructions on Samos in May 1945, then he was doing so something like eight months after it was liberated from German occupation by SAS trained Greek special forces. Must have been very secret.
 
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rynner2

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Following Columbus: The team trying to rewrite the explorer's route
By Gemma Handy Providenciales, Turks & Caicos

More than 500 years after Christopher Columbus made his first fateful landfall in the New World, modern day adventurers from Turks and Caicos are retracing his route on a quest to rewrite history.

The Italian explorer's momentous transatlantic voyage in 1492 saw the meeting of two hemispheres for the first time since the Vikings - a feat that would change the course of history forever.
But precisely where he initially set foot has been disputed for centuries, with as many as 10 islands across the Bahamas and Turks and Caicos (TCI) claiming the accolade.

Now a team of sailors and a historian have made it their mission through a series of maritime expeditions to prove that Columbus' arrival in the Americas was on Grand Turk, TCI's capital isle.
While their theory may not be popular among Bahamians who have long claimed San Salvador as the historic site, they say they want to "set the history books straight".
If successful, it could also be an enormous tourism boost to the tiny British territory.

Historian and long-time TCI resident Josiah Marvel has spent three decades scrutinising age-old texts detailing Columbus' voyage in libraries across the globe.
He has even created his own translations of Columbus' diary, accounting for mediaeval grammar and nautical phraseology.

Mr Marvel claims other modern translations have "too many flaws" to justify the long-held assertion that San Salvador, known as Watlings Island until 1926, was the landfall spot.
Among them is the failure to allow for magnetic variation - causing misreadings in Columbus' compasses - and the apparent impossibility of various moorings.

Additionally, Columbus' diary gives latitudes indicating the difference between the landfall island and Hispaniola to be 90 nautical miles.
"Almost the precise distance between Grand Turk and Hispaniola," Mr Marvel said.

To test the theory, he joined forces with two professional sea captains to sail an alternative route from Grand Turk to Ragged Island - Columbus' final stop in the Bahamas - via Mayaguana and the Inagua Islands.
[Map showing alternative routes]

The trio's first trip aboard catamaran Destiny II, which they say has speeds equivalent to Columbus' Santa Maria, set sail in November 2014.

Captaining the voyage was veteran Bahamian sailor Dave Calvert, who helped set a transatlantic crossing record in 2001.
"After becoming acquainted with Josiah's work, I do believe his theory is the most accurate," Mr Calvert told the BBC.

Expedition leader Tim Ainley said "clues" in Columbus' diary create a "fascinating puzzle which has enthralled historians and mariners for centuries".
"The text is vague because in those days they didn't have GPS, they didn't know how to calculate longitude and Columbus' fleet was completely lost - they thought they were heading for Japan," Mr Ainley explained.

Mr Ainley, who has 30 years' experience sailing the region's waters, continued: "Everybody agrees Columbus was a consummate mariner. His ships could not sail towards the wind so they would have been very careful about how they were going to sail back out of somewhere before they sailed in.
"Neither did they have anchor chains, so would have needed a clear sandy bottom to drop a rope-secured anchor in. This very much limits the anchorages.
"Also, magnetic variation meant Columbus thought he was heading west but in fact was heading further south than he realised. This ties in perfectly with Grand Turk which is the southernmost island of all the possible landfall places."

The last leg of the 2014 expedition was plagued by calm weather, prompting a follow-up trip last December.
After completing their route, the team is convinced it aligns precisely with the diary's clues.

This time the members were joined by US archaeologist Shaun Sullivan to search for evidence of a Lucayan settlement on Mayaguana, where the crew believe Columbus was when he reported being surrounded by Lucayans in canoes.
"It's absolutely clear that Columbus landed somewhere in the south-eastern Bahamas or Turks and Caicos - but exactly where remains an open question," Dr Sullivan said, adding that resolving the issue would require "a long, scholarly process" and the accumulation of additional physical evidence.

The men are now gearing up for a third voyage this autumn re-enacting Columbus' commonly accepted route from San Salvador to Ragged Island - with the explorer's logbook in hand - in an effort to prove the distances and directions do not fit the text as accurately as a departure from Grand Turk.

"I want to set the history books straight and prove once and for all that we know he landed in Grand Turk.
"To our knowledge, no other historian has ever sailed the various alternative routes through the southern Bahamas and TCI," Mr Ainley added.
"Personally, I find it fascinating. It gives me goose bumps to think I am literally sailing in the wake of Columbus' fleet from all those years ago."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-36884261

Fascinating stuff! Especially to me, as I called in briefly to the Turks and Caicos islands for fuel, in 1989.
 

Swifty

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I'm not sure if this counts as history rewritten, it's more of an anecdote but I hope it's true ..

I recently met a chap who served in the first gulf war, Steve was part of the first wave of UK ground attack troops on Kuwait. According to him, one of his lot phoned ahead to Hotel Baghdad with the classic "Hello .. is this Hotel Baghdad .. have you got 600 rooms available because we're on our way" .. :) .. Steve says the bloke got a MASSIVE bollocking for doing that.
 
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Ancient figurines were toys not mother goddess statues, say experts as 9,000-year-old artefacts are discovered
By David Derbyshire
Last updated at 9:08 AM on 10th September 2009

They were carved out of stone and squeezed out of clay 9,000 years ago, at the very dawn of civilisation.
Now archaeologists say these astonishing Stone Age statues could have been the world's first educational toys.

Nearly 2,000 figures have been unearthed at Catalhoyuk in Turkey - the world's oldest known town - over the last few decades. The most recent were found just last week.

Made by Neolithic farmers thousands of years before the creation of the pyramids or Stonehenge, they depict tiny cattle, crude sheep and flabby people.

In the 1960s, some researchers claimed the more rotund figures were of a mysterious large breasted and big bellied "mother goddess", prompting a feminist tourism industry that thrives today.

But modern day experts disagree.

They say the "mother goddess" figures - which were buried among the rubbish of the Stone Age town - are unlikely to be have been religious icons.

Many of the figures thought to have been women in the 1960s, are just as likely to be men.


Archaeologist Prof Lynn Meskell, of Stanford University, said: "The majority are cattle or sheep and goats. They could be representatives of animals they were dealing with - and they could have been teaching aides.

"All were found in the trash - and they were not in niches or platforms or placed in burials."

Out of the 2,000 figurines dug up at the site, less than five per cent are female, she told the British science Festival in Surrey University, Guildford.
"These are things that were made and used on a daily basis," she said. "People carried them around and discarded them."

Catalhoyuk is one of the most important archaeological sites in the world. Established around 7,000 BC, it was home to 5,000 people living in mud brick and plaster houses.

Their buildings were crammed so tightly together, the inhabitants clambered over the roofs and used ladders to get into their homes.

The town dwellers were early farmers who had domesticated a handful of plants and kept wild cattle for meat and milk. Cattle horns were incorporated into the walls of their homes.

The town contains the oldest murals - paintings on plastered walls. Unlike later towns, there is no obvious hierarchy - no homes for priests or leaders, no temples and no public spaces.

The dead were buried in spaces under homes, rather than in cemeteries.

Some researchers believe it was an equalitarian society.

The town survived for around 2,000 years. It is not known what happened to its inhabitants, but they may have been killed by invaders or driven away by the loss of nearby farmland.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... z0QhXg8BRO
Neolithic figurine, over 7,000 years old, unearthed at Turkey’s Çatalhöyük


Archaeologists at Turkey's neolithic site of Çatalhöyük in central Anatolia have unearthed a "unique" complete female figurine, The Ministry of Culture and Tourism said on Tuesday.

The statuette, measuring 17 centimeters (6.7 inches) long and weighing one kilogram (2.2 pounds), is considered unique due to its intact form and fine craftsmanship; it dates back to about 5500-8000 BC, a statement said.

The figurine, which is made of marmoreal stone and considered to be part of a ritual, was discovered by the international team of archaeologists working on site led by Professor Ian Hodder, anthropologist at Stanford University in the U.S. ...

http://www.dailysabah.com/history/2...000-years-old-unearthed-at-turkeys-catalhoyuk
 

Yithian

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Ancient Roman coins found buried under ruins of Japanese castle leave archaeologists baffled
The rare coins are thought to date back to around 400AD

Archaeologists were left baffled by the "strange" discovery of ancient Roman coins buried in the ruins of a castle in Japan.

The four copper coins were retrieved from soil beneath Katsuren Castle on Okinawa Island, and were originally thought to be a hoax before their true provenance was revealed.

The designs on the coins are difficult to decifer as they have been eroded over time, but x-ray analysis revealed several of the relics bore the image of Emperor Constantine I.

Since excavation on the site began in 2013, researchers have also found a further six coins which may be dated back to the Ottoman Empire in the late 17th century.

Continued with video at link:
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/s...okinawa-buried-ancient-currency-a7332901.html
 

Ermintruder

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(Neolithic Figurines) "Some researchers believe it was an equalitarian society"

This has been society which has surpassed mere egalitarian standards of equalness, far beyond, to a level of equality we can only guess at....all things being equal.
 

rynner2

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Is the Mosquito the greatest warplane of all?
The Spitfire is more famous but, discovers Jasper Copping, the de Havilland Mosquito can claim to be the plane that won the war
[video]
By Jasper Copping
7:00AM BST 21 Jul 2013

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/worl ... f-all.html

http://www.channel4.com/programmes/the- ... ritain/4od

I saw the documentary last night, and although I thought I was fairly familiar with the mozzie, the fact that it could be fitted with a sub-busting gun was new to me, as was the fact that it could land on aircraft carriers! 8)
http://www.channel4.com/programmes/the-plane-that-saved-britain/on-demand/57221-001

This documentary is still available - I'm watching it now!
 
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